Bike test: Islabikes eJoni

The Islabikes eJoni
A grey step-through e-cycle stands in the middle of a cycle trail between a wooded area
A grey step-through e-cycle stands in the middle of a cycle trail between a wooded area
Dan Joyce's picture

Bike test: Islabikes eJoni

The electric version of Islabikes’ sit-up-and-beg step-through is ideally suited to riders with less strength or stiffer joints. Dan Joyce test rode it and polled other riders’ opinions

Like the eJimi, the eJoni is the electric version of a bike built for older or less able riders. The step-through frame, upright riding position, low gears, and easy-tyre-change rims remain. A 250W Mahle hub motor adds power for easier pedalling.

This adds weight but not so much that it’s hard to manhandle. At 15.5kg (size M) the eJoni is no heavier than many unpowered city bikes, and light enough to be lifted up a few steps or onto a towbar mounted bike rack by most owners.

Mounting and dismounting is easy thanks to the low-step aluminium frame. If you needed it to be easier still, you could fit an externally-cabled dropper seatpost. The bottom bracket isn’t too high, however, so it’s not hard to get a foot down without a dropper. Pedalling is nicely ergonomic thanks to shorter cranks with a narrower pedal tread.


The digital display on an e-cycle mounted to its handlebars shows shows various data
The PulsarOne display shows assistance mode and charge remaining much more clearly than the iWoc controller

The 250Wh battery in the down tube isn’t meant to be removed until it needs replacing (after about 15,000 miles, at a cost of £599.99), so you must park the eJoni near a socket for recharging. It should do 30–40 miles per charge. As ever, range is hammered by very steep climbs (I took it up a 25% hill).

Standard fittings include mudguards, a rear rack, and high-quality Supernova lights wired to the main battery. You can’t fit bottle cages except to the carbon fork or a stem-top mount (£13). A propstand (£23) is another extra. Get one – and the optional, wireless PulsarOne display (£100) that the test bike came with.

Standard fittings include mudguards, a rear rack, and high-quality Supernova lights wired to the main battery. You can’t fit bottle cages except to the carbon fork or a stem-top mount (£13). A propstand (£23) is another extra. Get one – and the optional, wireless PulsarOne display (£100) that the test bike came with.

Verdict

Arguably the pinnacle of the whole, keep-youriding Islabikes Icons and e-Icons ranges. It’s super easy to mount and dismount, easy to ride, and easy to live with. Next time someone says e-bikes are “cheating”, show them this.

Other options

Ribble Urban AL E £1,999 at the time of writing


A press photo of a cream step-through e-cycle which has front and rear racks

Lightweight e-bike with a Mahle hub motor (X35), iWoc controller, 1× drivetrain (11-speed Apex), hydraulic discs, and lights.

Cube Compact Hybrid 500 £2,999


A small white and grey step-through e-cycle

Low-step urban e-bike with 20in wheels, a 5-speed hub gear, and a torquier (65Nm) Bosch mid-drive. Much heavier at 23.8kg. 

Sponsored Advert
Sponsored Advert
Sponsored Advert
Sponsored Advert
Sponsored Advert
Sponsored Advert