Help break the Cycle of social isolation

Help 'break the cycle' of social isolation, reduce anxiety and depression and introduce the benefits of cycling to our communities. We need your support and donations to continue our vital work and to support people and make a better world by bike.

The past year has been hard for everyone, especially for those who have had to face the dark months alone. This is why we need your donations to continue our vital work and continue to support people through cycling. Your generosity can make such a difference to people's mental and physical well-being. 

With Bike Week, delivered by Cycling UK, here to highlight all the wonderful difference cycling can make now is the perfect time to get involved. We begin our week of cycling celebrations with the World's Biggest Bike Ride, where you can join thousands of others who will be taking part. Any kind of cycle ride counts no matter how far you go or what your motivation is. As long as you get out and ride on 30 May, alone or with friends, if you log your journey it will count as being part of the World's Biggest Bike Ride. Plus this year we have an extra special event. England's cathedrals have teamed up with Cycling UK to help encourage cycling between cathedrals to promote greener travel and mental and physical wellbeing.  

Launching the first ever Cathedrals Cycle Route 'Relay challenge' - each cathedral will be trial blazing the route during a 42 day relay event covering almost 2000 miles and raising money. That's 42 Cathedrals, 42 Days, 42 Teams. 

Naheed's story
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Bike Week

Delivered each year by Cycling UK, in partnership in Scotland with Cycling Scotland, Bike Week encourages quarter of a million people to join in events, rethink their everyday journeys, and switch to cycling as the most convenient way to get around. Join thousands of people all across the UK and enjoy the simple pleasure of riding a bike. Let's make the world better by bike.

Bike Week is running from 30 May to 5 June 2021

World’s Biggest Bike Ride

Thousands of people of all abilities, experience and age took part in Cycling UK’s first World’s Biggest Bike Ride event on 12 September last year. 

From roadies to mountain bikers, seasoned tourers to family groups, the fit to the not so fit, cyclists from across the country logged rides to celebrate the bike and the joy of riding. 

It's not about distance or duration, it’s about giving it a go. Any kind of cycle ride counts no matter how far you go or what your motivation is.

Together we will create the World's Biggest Bike Ride on one day!

When you join us this year why not donate, help start Bike Week with a bang and make the world better by bike! 

Cathedrals Cycle Route 'Relay challenge'

Launching this Bike Week is the first ever Cathedrals Cycle Route 'Relay challenge' - each cathedral will be trial blazing the route during a 42 day relay event covering almost 2000 miles and raising money. That's 42 Cathedrals, 42 Days, 42 Teams.  Whichever English cathedral you visit this year, you will be able to arrive by bike thanks to a unique partnership between Cycling UK, the British Pilgrimage Trust, Sustrans and the Association of English Cathedrals that will link every Church of England cathedral in a new initiative to promote greener travel and mental and physical wellbeing. It is hoped that the route will be extended to other nations of the UK in the future.

Community Cycle Clubs
Supporting people through cycling

Cycling UK’s community interventions are helping people to provide a little bit of normality in this tumultuous time.

1) In Edinburgh and the Lothians, Vie Velo is a club bringing together visually impaired and sighted cyclists to enjoy the thrill and camaraderie of tandem cycling. Established by Cycling UK, the group has continued riding where coronavirus guidance has allowed, providing a real boost to members both physically and socially. Online meet-ups have also kept people connected when riding wasn’t possible.

2) In South Yorkshire we work with the Recovery College which supports people with serious mental health issues when they’re discharged from hospital to integrate back into the community. We know that participants’ mental health has deteriorated further in lockdown, especially as so many participants are from a BAME background. We want to support them to stay on their bikes.

3) In Gosport, we support the community cycling club at the FirstLight Trust, where veterans of the armed forces and emergency services, some of whom suffer from PTSD, can socialise, talk and regain confidence.

It doesn’t stop there, these are just a few examples and with your help we would love to expand our activities and support to many more communities across the whole of the UK.

Narinder’s story

Narinder Kaur, from Walsall in the West Midlands, has been on the frontline as an Intensive Care Nurse since the pandemic struck. No stranger to grief, she lost her father two years ago but in part got over her loss thanks to the support of Cycling UK’s community work, where she learned how to cycle.

“If it wasn’t for Cycling UK helping me to learn how to ride a bike, I’m not sure how I would’ve coped after losing my dad,” says Narinder. “It came at the right time because I couldn’t stop thinking about my dad. But when I was learning to ride, I was having to focus on learning a new skill. It helped me move forward.”

Living alone and working in the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU) has taken its toll on her at times, often leaving her with no outlet or break. “Physically I’ve been well,” she says. “As a nurse in ITU, it has been incredibly overwhelming and stressful. At times it was so hard, I was quite traumatised. When my colleagues and I were putting on PPE preparing to go on shift, we were just praying we would be okay, and we worried for our loved ones.”

However, one thing which has helped get her through all this has been the community she has found in her cycling group. “As a nurse, I’ve still been going out and seeing people during the lockdowns. But you want to leave work behind and talk about simple things. You need that connection where you can talk to others.”

Narinder’s story

Narinder Kaur, from Walsall in the West Midlands, has been on the frontline as an Intensive Care Nurse since the pandemic struck. No stranger to grief, she lost her father two years ago but in part got over her loss thanks to the support of Cycling UK’s community work, where she learned how to cycle.

“If it wasn’t for Cycling UK helping me to learn how to ride a bike, I’m not sure how I would’ve coped after losing my dad,” says Narinder. “It came at the right time because I couldn’t stop thinking about my dad. But when I was learning to ride, I was having to focus on learning a new skill. It helped me move forward.”

Living alone and working in the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU) has taken its toll on her at times, often leaving her with no outlet or break. “Physically I’ve been well,” she says. “As a nurse in ITU, it has been incredibly overwhelming and stressful. At times it was so hard, I was quite traumatised. When my colleagues and I were putting on PPE preparing to go on shift, we were just praying we would be okay, and we worried for our loved ones.”

However, one thing which has helped get her through all this has been the community she has found in her cycling group. “As a nurse, I’ve still been going out and seeing people during the lockdowns. But you want to leave work behind and talk about simple things. You need that connection where you can talk to others.”

Sometimes you become vulnerable, because there’s no one else to talk to. When the cycling group gets together, it’s been absolutely amazing. The community cycling club is like family.
Narinder Kaur