Sentencing

Caught eight times for using his mobile whilst driving, Christopher Gard convinced the Magistrates he wouldn't do it again, and that banning him would cause him hardship. Cyclist Lee Martin paid the price six weeks later when Gard drove into and killed him, whilst texting his mate about walking his dog. Nine chances for Gard before he took a life. Now he wants to appeal his sentence.

 
 
Why bother with facts when you can rely on prejudice and teach that behaviour to others? This week's lesson from a London Magistrate is that people don't like cyclists, your held in low esteem, and you really must do something to repair your reputation. Good to hear there's no bicycle bias on the Bench!

 
 
After two years where nothing has happened, with the Government’s long awaited motoring offences and penalties review stalled in first gear, we might at last have some answers about what it will look at, and a date for its publication.

 
 
Caught eight times for driving a mobile phone, but allowed by a court to carry on driving lest the loss of his licence might cause his family hardship. Six weeks later Christopher Gard was texting as he drove into and killed cyclist Lee Martin. Which did the Magistrates think was more important, Gard's need to drive or the safety of other road users?

 
 
Two years ago the then Justice Secretary Chris Grayling announced a full review of all driving offences and penalties. Replaced by Michael Gove last year, what do Grayling and Gove have in common apart from their views on Brexit? The answer is under their watch, waiting for the review is like Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett’s play where there is nothing to be done, and [SPOILERS] nothing happens

 
 
Two cyclists still recovering from life-threatening injuries caused by dangerous drivers. Two convicted motorists spared jail and given suspended sentences. Too many lenient sentences in serious injury cases. Too long to wait for the Government's Review of Sentencing for motoring offences.

 
 
Clamping down on driver mobile phone use: by catching fewer offenders, sending them for retraining, disqualifying fewer drivers and ignoring other distraction risks. Roll up to read the Government’s new Road Safety Statement!

 
 
CTC, the national cycling charity, expressed concern that the Government’s new Road Safety Statement issued yesterday (21 December) effectively lets unsafe drivers “off the hook”.

 
 
Driver Derek Edward Chenney has been sentenced to a curfew order and a two year driving disqualification after admitting to causing the death of head teacher Paul Miller by careless driving. Chenney drove into the illuminated cyclist, having failed to see him for seven seconds. But why was he charged with 'careless' rather than 'dangerous' driving?

 
 
CTC's Duncan Dollimore examines why a cyclist not wearing a helmet and other excuses are used to deflect blame in motoring offences, and why so many people, including judges, are unduly empathetic to road crime offenders.

 
 
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