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Re: iPhone GPS Navigation in Holland

I'm assuming you want offline maps.

Try Pocket Earth or Outdoor GPS. From what I vould see from having a look at them, PE is simpler to use as you can email the file to yourself and then open in PE while with Outdoor GPS you have to upload the file to their site. But Outdoor GPS lets you download the free Open Street Map mapping while with PE you need to buy the maps. I've only had a quick look so that could be wrong.

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 17 May 2016 - 3:14pm
Marginal gains!

Osmium weighs twice as much as lead, 22.6kg/litre, so if your frame and bottle cages could take it, a couple of bottles of it would add a huge weight to an elite racer on a superlight bike. Assuming you could actually get them on the bike nonchalantly. It might be too much extra weight that it would seriously affect handling, but it would certainly help downhill.

Re: Cycling from Lourdes to Perpignan

Thanks so much - have just tracked down the V81 which looks helpful!

iPhone GPS Navigation in Holland

I need some help as I will be riding around Holland and Belgium for 4 days over the forth-coming bank holiday weekend.

The planned route is from Rotterdam to Antwerp - Antwerp to Eindhoven - Eindhoven to Utrecht - Utrecht to Rotterdam. I have managed to plan the routes online using the Fietserbond route planner and it gives me the option to download as GPX file - this is where I start to struggle.

What I need to know is how do I download the GPX and then export it into a mapping app that I can use on the bike for navigation when cycling in Holland and Belgium?

Hopefully someone can help me get these routes onto my iPhone and advise a mapping app so I can use it in much the same way as a Garmin?

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 17 May 2016 - 10:39am
Computer-driven cars will not (do not! cannot!) defy the laws of physics. They still need time to come to a stop. What they will usually be able to do is detect the presence and movement of people, animals and objects even when they are not visible (because they will use multiple senses -- not just vision) and predict and prepare for their actions. So playing chicken won't be such fun because actually the robocar will be altering its course and speed before you step out.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 17 May 2016 - 10:25am
Postboxer wrote:I'm talking about people stepping out so the driverless car does an emergency stop, the occupants might spill their cornflakes, or hot drinks, then be rear ended by the driver behind. Kids might play chicken more. A google car got confused by a cyclist doing a trackstand and wouldn't move.
Excellent: The google car did exactly what I do if a cyclist to does a trackstand in front of me: I have no idea if (s)he is going to fall over or accelerate in an unpredictable direction and will wait whilst (s)he sorts himself out. I have also been known to do an emergency stop when kids decided to jump out in front of me. So a google car does the same = good news, better than the 'cars rule the road' attitude of many human drivers.

Re: Downslink works: Bramber to Shoreham-by-Sea

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 17 May 2016 - 8:34am
squeaker wrote:Despite what it says on the engineering drawings, limestone 'dust' has been used as the top surface, so much like the recent Downslink alternative route under the A283 by the river. For drainage, the designer seems to be relying on camber plus permeability of the sub base. Having ridden it yesterday, my main concern is the edges in some parts, which are not to spec. and are going to crumble quickly, as well as presenting a bit of a hazard.
30cmEdgeDrop.jpg
Yes I see what you mean. I've ridden this route a few times since it reopened and hadn't noticed the raised edge.
It will be interesting to see ( or not ), if over time that edge starts to crumble away.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 17 May 2016 - 8:04am
I'm talking about people stepping out so the driverless car does an emergency stop, the occupants might spill their cornflakes, or hot drinks, then be rear ended by the driver behind. Kids might play chicken more. A google car got confused by a cyclist doing a trackstand and wouldn't move.

Re: Rhine route (EV15) - is it worth it?

Myself and three other riders will be touring the Euro Velo 15, Rhine Route from Andermatt to Rotterdam for three weeks starting in late July. If you have done this route and can recommend some of your not to be missed experiences, it would be appreciated. The hidden gems of your trip, items not in the guide books is what we are looking for. Sightseeing spots, restaurants, best campsites or any not to miss experiences you found and really enjoyed would be nice to hear about.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 17 May 2016 - 12:40am
Why on earth would you consider it to be a problem that pedestrians could cross the road without fearing being mown down?

Re: Tram lines...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 16 May 2016 - 10:40pm
http://www.croydonadvertiser.co.uk/Coro ... story.html

What are the chances of Croydon Corporation following the coroners recommendation - one in how many thousand ?

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 May 2016 - 10:23pm
Quilt is polite one and packs to the size of a can of coke but only 690g. The 1kg sleeping bag packs down into less than 10 litres probably a lot less than that. Oh and they're extra long too because I'm 6'5" tall. The sleeping bag is a bit heavy but it packs down ok. It's also a fusion bag from marmot. That is it's down inner layer and primaloft outer layer. This might sound strange but I got it for a song when short of cash and it's actually great for bivvy use or single skin tent use which was what I used when I got it.

Pack volume more than weight I think is the issue. Both these bags pack small enough to fit in probably 12-15 litres. Small enough to fit into a dry bag stashed to the bars I think.

I get the bit about the trailer. It's just a real drag in the way I think panniers aren't. Whenever I use it I'm stuck in the small chainring and lowest gears. I'd run out of low gears I think on steeper hills. I suspect use of trailers would mean I'd need to change the gearing drastically. A change to long drop rear derailleur, change in cassette to include granny gear and possibly change the chainset too. 50-34T chainrings and 11-25 cassette. Great commuter but with a trailer It's sometimes hard work.

Mind you the trailer is great with toys and a huge cuddly toy that he can fall asleep against. Great when it's very wet and windy.

Re: Tram lines...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 16 May 2016 - 10:16pm
What can trams do that buses can't do? The zero emissions (at point of use) plus is negated when they are sharing the streets with other traffic, especially buses. Otherwise buses built to offer the same seating space as trams would have the advantages of being able to operate both on exclusive routes where appropriate and shared streets where appropriate. They wouldn't have needed the 3/4 of a £ billion spent on the Edinburgh system much of which was for digging up ancient streets to move utilities - not needed for bus systems.

Any minimal speed advantages for trams are due to dedicated routes. You don't need a bus running on rails to have separate routes when appropriate. Another tram speed advantage is the limited stops. Conventional city buses make the mistake of having stops so close together the bus can be stopping every couple of hundred yards. That is easily changed.

And buses don't need tramlines to cause cyclist injuries and deaths.

http://www.croydonadvertiser.co.uk/Coro ... story.html

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 16 May 2016 - 10:07pm
It would be easy to bully driverless cars though, just step out in front of them to cross the road, safe in the knowledge that they'll stop for you. This may also cause problems when some cars have a computer in control, some have a human, some drivers may take advantage, assuming the driverless cars will be easily identifiable.

Re: Sri Lanka

Envy here- I've been twice and have in laws there but haven't been north or east yet (it was the civil war last time I visited). I'd love to visit Jafna and Trincomalee.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 16 May 2016 - 8:07pm
And - the reason it was noteworthy is that this was the very first example of a collision in which a driverless car was deemed at fault. After millions of miles of testing ALL the other crashes they have been involved in have been caused by human drivers.

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 16 May 2016 - 7:43pm
They are allowed pretty prepares bike swaps, a number of pros do it on Paris Roubaix for the longer cobbled sections towards the end.

I'd definitely more interested to see what the rules are on taking on 2 "water bottles" full of lead were and whether you could take on enough weight to give a significant advantage...

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 16 May 2016 - 7:43pm
Interesting article Postboxer. I like how they weigh the advantage of the different bike against the time taken to changeover and figure that 15sec net makes it worthwhile!

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 16 May 2016 - 7:39pm
Yes I believe loading up with bottles is a way of adding to momentum.
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