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Re: The worst training route ever?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:03am
Sounds like you are out on the south of the island. Why not try the north west/east? I think you can take bikes on to the buses there can't you?

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:43am
I wasn't aware of this (resized) bag OP - thanks.

Will watch this thread with interest.

I have used the Tardis and found it excellent though I wouldn't fancy the prospect of partly disassembling a larger tourer into it I hoped to ride away on sharpish.

Re: The worst training route ever?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:43am
Spend your winters in Mallorca where there are a mix of roads inc, long straight via de serveis alongside the motorways... good for some flat out efforts and no speed bumps,multiple junctions, no lights etc......
I can ride to work, horwich - preston at 05:40-07:15 at a high pace with a good av speed only to see that av speed disappear downwards as I hit the outskirts of Bamber bridge/ preston and have to slow / stop for various junctions, lights, etc........

Your route sounds horrendous and I find anywhere where i ride with multiple junctions, speed bumps etc around lancashire lanes only gives me an average speed of 13-15mph for a ride while on flat sections i can be topping 18-20mph, once the TT season starts i easily top 20mph average.

Re: Tavistock Torrington Place cycle route trial (Camden)

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:42am
Pete Owens wrote:That is already accounted for in the 3.5m (otherwise it would be 4m) - it is 2x1m for each of the cyclists + 0.5m between them + 2x0.5m either side. And while that is sufficient for 2 cyclists coming from opposite directions to pass each other you would really want to allow more space when overtaking.
Where are you getting 3.5m from? LTN 1/12 table 7.5 has 2m minimum for a one-way non-edge-constrained cycle track, which I think is a bit narrow as it should be at least 2.5m = 2x1m + 0.5m between. It shouldn't need the extra 0.5m on the edges because they shouldn't be high enough to strike a bike.

In practice, bikes get overtaken often in 2m effective width, easily in 2.5m and we even manage to pass head-to-head on 1.2m but that's not fun. I'd probably move onto the carriageway to overtake on Tavistock-Torrington, but that wasn't an easy option on the narrow veloduct and plenty of people overtook in it anyway.
Finally, one direction wasn't kerbed, which also increases the practical width slightly.
Not really as it has those plastic humps which you need to keep clear of. In any case it is not a slight amount of extra space needed but 1.3m.
Those humps should have been too low to strike a pedal so wouldn't require the space (delineator posts would) and they're not currently there anyway - which is where we came into this thread.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:31am
You know, I tend to agree with Vorpal.

For people, like me, who are interested in the mechanics of their bicycle, it is inconceivable to not know how to fix a puncture or quieten a noisy drivetrain.

But why should only people like that cycle?

Still, I can’t help but roll my eyes – figuratively speaking – at the sort of person who rides a three-grand carbon wonder and lubes the chain once a year whether it needs it or not. Caring and at once not caring about performance in this way is a contradiction in terms, so I’m left thinking they only care about the image they project.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:15am
This spring at late evenng,in the car, on a single track lane between high banks I came upon a brown bearlike animal. It was a reddish brown colour and I got within 2 meters of it although It never really showed me its face. Just the other end.
It was large for a badger but I believe it was just that; an erythristic (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythrism) badger!
It was remarkably bear like! And I really struggled to identify it despite being so close.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 8:57am
DaveP wrote:Vorpal wrote:IMO, it's no more necessary to know how fix a puncture on bike than a car. There are plenty of shops and independent mechanics that can fix a puncture for a minimal fee.
I find it a bit odd to read this, written by a woman. Sorry to disagree and all that, but you seem to have overlooked the risks associated with being stranded in a random location. At least in a car one can lock oneself inside and wait for rescue with some degree of comfort and security.

I've only ever had one puncture outside a bike shop, about thirty years ago...
I had just dismounted to gaze at a two wheeled fantasy in bright red in the window when there was a sudden detonation wrecking tyre, tube, and buckling the wheel Most expensive puncture I have ever had!
If it's about risk, call a taxi (or a friend), rather than changing a puncture by the road, which can take much longer for someone who is inexperienced. Also, there are rescue services for cyclists, like those for motorists. Lastly, not everyone can physically manage getting a tyre off and replacing or patching an inner tube. Maybe most people can handle slime and CO2 cartridges, but not everyone wants to. People who are likely to ride 10 miles from any sort of help are more likely to be self-reliant, or ride with friends.

I'm not sure that I understand why it's odd for a woman to have written it. I have never felt particularly at risk by the side of the road. While I understand why some people feel that way, I should think that it applies to anyone who feels vulnerable, and not just or necessarily women. In any case being able to fix a puncture at the side of the road won't be the best solution for all of those who feel vulnerable.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 8:45am
It certainly wasn't a badger, deer or muntjac. I've seen plenty of those, and they are easily recognisable.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 8:44am
I suspect the bike shop was in some kind of racket with the puncture fairy.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 8:35am
Vorpal wrote:IMO, it's no more necessary to know how fix a puncture on bike than a car. There are plenty of shops and independent mechanics that can fix a puncture for a minimal fee.
I find it a bit odd to read this, written by a woman. Sorry to disagree and all that, but you seem to have overlooked the risks associated with being stranded in a random location. At least in a car one can lock oneself inside and wait for rescue with some degree of comfort and security.

I've only ever had one puncture outside a bike shop, about thirty years ago...
I had just dismounted to gaze at a two wheeled fantasy in bright red in the window when there was a sudden detonation wrecking tyre, tube, and buckling the wheel Most expensive puncture I have ever had!

Re: GPS

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:23am
I have a 62s and it has been brilliant. I wanted rugged and accurate and was impressed by the claims for excellent reception. It has survived a day in heavy rain. Compared with my mates Edge it has consistently done a better job of showing our location on a map and has suffered lost signal under trees and near high buildings less often. This is when we have both been using the same gpx file. I have never seriously tried to use the on board routing, and have no plans to do so with the exception that in a city, if I was looking for a postal address and had a City Navigator map installed I would give it a try on the grounds that these maps seem to support this type of task well and "know" about one way systems etc. (also if it doesn't work the distances involved are relatively small!).
The biggest downsides in my eyes are the relatively small screen, which I accepted when I chose pushbuttons over touchscreen, and a finite limit on the number of route waypoints that can be stored. The Edges seem to have no such limit.

Ignoramus wrote:I've battled to make a Garmin 62S work properly for a couple of years now.... ... The problem has been that the route has only very rarely downloaded correctly onto the device - it doesn't stick to the roads and has just gone in a straight line from one via point to the next
It occurs to me that your device might be seeing your routes as corrupted files. If you spend time refining routes in Basecamp, which I do, as I like to produce the most accurate track that the map will allow, making changes, putting in an extra way point to pin it more closely to the road, making sure that you are on the track on the appropriate side of dual carriageways, going round roundabouts in the correct direction etc. etc. then the timestamps associated with the list of waypoints that constitute your .gpx file will almost certainly not be in sequence.
I was very lucky when I started to create my own routes because I used an online resource that automatically sorted this problem out without being asked. IIRC the one I used is now defunct. I didn't even suspect that waypoints had timestamps until someone casually mentioned it. Basecamp still doesn't, as far as I know, address the problem.
I was recommended to use GPX Track Editor which is a free download. Browse to your .gpx file, tell it which end is the start and it will produce a copy of your file with everything in order. I would strongly recommend making some change to the file name before exporting it! If you then load the copy into Basecamp it should now have directional arrows - and it should display on a Garmin device
Cost you nothing but a bit of time - give it a try! HTH

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:55am
Postboxer wrote:It be the Beast of Trowbridge I tells ya!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -prey.htmlThat description in the link, seems very much like what I saw up in our wood. The one I saw was brown and not black.

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:47am
Anyone had any problem having the Groundeffect bag accepted at check in?

I've had one occasion (at Kalamata airport) where the groundeffect bag was too big to go through the x-ray machine, which caused a bit of head-scratching (but in the end they just gave it a Stern Look and waved it through...); otherwise, no problems at all: I think because it looks like a 'proper' bag, check-in staff are much less likely to quibble. (The possible downside, I suppose, is because it looks less obviously like a bike, baggage handlers are more likely to chuck it around the place: I line the bag with scavenged cardboard boxes when I can, though -- touch wood -- my bikes haven't suffered any damage even when I haven't been able to do this).

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:42am
A 10 mile walk is no more physically onerous than a 10 mile bike ride.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:19am
Neilo wrote:But the overwhelming thing that I noticed yesterday was that a large amount of the people I saw, are either unable are can't be bothered to do even simple maintenance on their bikes.
So many people came past me, I'm not that fast, with rattles, creaks, strange noises and my pet hate, when it happens to me I have to sort it straight away, ticking derailleurs.

Some bits make a bit of noise, independent of whether they are well maintained. And frankly, if it doesn't bother the person riding it, and the bike is safe, I don't see that it should make any difference.

ANTONISH wrote:Perhaps it should be taught in schoolIs it taught in Bikeability??[/quote]

Dunno Mick F but I think it ought to be.[/quote]

There's hardly time in Bikeability to teach students the basics of safe cycling & using the road. Those who are interested in how to fix a puncture can learn elsewhere. IMO, it's no more necessary to know how fix a puncture on bike than a car. There are plenty of shops and independent mechanics that can fix a puncture for a minimal fee.

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:15am
Thanks for positive replies. Annoyingly I was in Oz a few weeks ago, could have got one then.

Martin, I'm aware of what can be done with poly bags, bubble wrap and sticky back plastic, but I want a proper bag. Firstly to avoid sourcing all that stuff each time and secondly because some airlines are getting very fussy over how your bike is wrapped, likewise Japanese railways. Finally a proper bag with shoulder strap, etc is much easier to manoeuvre than an amorphous mass of plastic. Nonetheless thanks for suggestion.

Anyone had any problem having the Groundeffect bag accepted at check in?

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:12am
Cars need constant maintenance if you count having to fill them up with fuel all the time.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:07am
Lord McAlpine has a Capybara that keeps escaping. It then sends in letters to the Henley Standard. Most amusing..

Al

Re: Channel Isles

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 6:47am
Many thanks for all the excellent tips!
Hope to get to Guernsey just before the English school holidays
Thanks again!!
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