Feed aggregator

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 2:25pm
Jogging is about 4 times harder (in terms of energy expended) than cycling (flat ground).

So a 5 mile jog is like a 20 mile bike ride, it is to me anyway.

5 mile jog... I wouldn't do that if you paid me, but 30 mile bike rides are no problem.

Perhaps jogging is even harder than 4x harder than cycling then, I have no idea really, just guessing from my own knackeredness after doing both.

The only time I ran 5 miles in one go was drunk at 2:30AM after missing my taxi and wanting to get home quicker. Running in formal shoes lol. Its the sort of thing I would need to be drunk to do and I was. Ankles were sore for 5 days lol. That lactic acid.

Re: What camera?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 2:15pm
Are there any recommendations for a sub £50 cam from you chaps and chapettes?
I ask because I witnessed the worst driving I've ever seen today and didn't have cam footage to give the police so it's gone unreported.
Basically an audiot overtaking me by driving in excess of 30mph on the footpath just to beat me to the lights. I was taking the lane to prevent close passes on a short stretch of road where one lane was closed due to canal works....reinforcing the canal banking.
A very heated argument developed between the driver and I when I caught up with him.
Fuming isn't the word.

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 2:09pm
brynpoeth wrote:How would you respond to being talked to in this way? Would you complain to the Chief Constable that the cop was disrespectful?I would've responded like you did. Accept I'd been caught and think myself lucky.

However, complain the the CC?
Possibly, yes, but I'd give a week or too and only complain in general terms and not specifically.

We pay their wages. They are not gods or put on this earth to rule us with rods of iron. They get grumpy like the rest of us, but you wouldn't accept that behaviour from a private company personnel. If they spoke to the public like that, the firm would be out of business PDQ.

Re: Bike friendly hotel Tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 2:03pm
Formule 1 hotels: You can check in 24 hrs a day and put your bike in your room. Cheap, basic with a good value buffet breakfast.

ZAC de la Vrillonnerie, 3 Rue Philippe Maupas, 37170 Chambray-lès-Tours, France

http://www.accorhotels.com/gb/booking/r ... d=36627861

Re: The worst training route ever?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 1:55pm
It sounds like you are riding too far and too fast and also not far enough and too slow at the same time.

If you really want to go faster try the following for six weeks, but see your doctor first.

Session 1: 15 minute warm up then 1 & 1/2 to 2 & 1/2 hours at a pace you can maintain throughout (without going fast up the hills) but certainly isn't easy.

two speed session of intervals:
1) 15 minute warm up the 4 minutes just about as fast as you can maintain the same pace for four minutes then 1 minute steady to recover. Then repeat until the you find yourself not being able to hold the same pace as the first interval, but certainly no more than 6 times in total. 15 minutes cool down.

2) 15 minute warm up the 1 minutes just about as fast as you can maintain the same pace for 1 minute then 1 minute steady to recover. Then repeat until the you find yourself not being able to hold the same pace as the first interval, but certainly no more than 6 times in total. 15 minutes cool down.

You can do other leisure ridings and getting about but make sure you are rested for the training rides.

After 6 weeks have an easy week and instead of the longer ride do a short easy one.

Next week do your time-trial. Not suggesting you just do one every six weeks but target one, club champs?

Best place to do the interval sessions is as mentioned above is a turbo-trainer. Also some way of measuring output is useful, power is best if not HR though this lags behind effort especially one 1 minute intervals.
I know it's boring, it's also a bit miserable but if you want to go faster.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 1:21pm
Samuel D wrote:But why should only people like that cycle?



I don't think anyone is suggesting that. It isn't unusual to find cyclists on a club run who struggle to deal with a puncture.
It's just that I can't imagine going out cycling without the means or ability to perform a simple task like mending a puncture (or at least being able to change a tube).

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 12:58pm
I'm not sure when the Surrey Puma was last reported (I used to live in Surrey, but I never saw it...). It may have changed its territory and be ranging further afield.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 12:56pm
MrsHJ wrote:I don't think I would categorise myself as experienced in such illustrious company but I've spent far too much time trying to extract bits of shredded bungee from various parts of the rear derallieur etc I find for regular trips my kids bags that are mounted with clips and then have an elastic retainer bit at the bottom can have the elastic bit shorn off to avoid the inevitable "mummy, my rear wheel won't turn".
that sounds familiar!

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 12:51pm
iviehoff wrote: ............ and since they can subsist fine on rabbits (my ordinary moggy routinely catches and eats rabbits) they can become feral.Not too sure about that as a plain fact.

Rabbits are routinely brought in by Nellie our cat. She left her original home one spring, never to return. We know her original owner BTW.
Nellie subsisted on rabbits all that spring/summer and into autumn, but by the time she appeared at our front door, she was in a pitiful state. We knew who she was because we knew where she was supposed to live, but she wanted to live with us instead so we took her in and fed her up. Her owner was happy that Nellie was happy.

That was three years ago. She's still catching rabbits - one or two a day sometimes - and often brings them in through the catflap and eats them under our bed during the night.

Trouble is, by mid autumn, the rabbits are beginning to go below ground and rarely venture out and Nellie's food supply dries up.
Therefore domestic cats can't subsist on rabbits or any small mammals for a whole year, they need "A Levels in Cat Flap Studies" or find alternative sources of food.

Big "cats" can catch bigger prey and can indeed subsist though the winter. There's enough roe deer for instance running through the woods and gardens round here to keep them quite well fed.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 12:41pm
mjr wrote:I'm currently having a similar dither. Do I use my cheap no-name small single panniers on a weekend tour so I can carry them more easily, use the axle-mounted bungees to attach bags to the rack top and risk them getting up to their old tricks (bent/broken hooks, trying to sag their corners into the wheel or bounce off, and so on), or do I take the bigger and sturdier Basil Mara double panniers and just deal with needing extra luggage straps to attach anything to the rack top and the relative awkwardness of carrying a double off the bike? What would more experienced tourists do?


I don't think I would categorise myself as experienced in such illustrious company but I've spent far too much time trying to extract bits of shredded bungee from various parts of the rear derallieur etc I find for regular trips my kids bags that are mounted with clips and then have an elastic retainer bit at the bottom can have the elastic bit shorn off to avoid the inevitable "mummy, my rear wheel won't turn".

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 12:26pm
For a weekend, I have sometimes taken only one pannier.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 12:00pm
Most suspected ABCs turn out to be:

1) Ordinary moggies, but seen in a situation which confuses the brain as to the perspective and gives a false impression that they are much larger than they really are. Most actual photos that turn up are just this. There are also some quite large varieties of domestic cat, 7 kg is typical for a male Bengal type, and since they can subsist fine on rabbits (my ordinary moggy routinely catches and eats rabbits) they can become feral.
2) Large dogs or foxes (black foxes exist), again seen in confusing lighting/perspective situations.

Sometimes there is a real large cat there, but in nearly all such cases it can be clearly shown to be a recent escape from captivity - in practice this must be where they all come from. There are a surprising number of people trying to keep one as a pet. Due to the period in captivity, such animals are typically not able to hunt sufficiently to keep themselves alive, despite the surfeit of deer and rabbits in many parts of England, and are generally seen to be in poor health when a body is found or a capture made. For example the lion caught in Scotland and the lynx caught in London, and one or two road-kill carcases found indicate poor health. So I don't think they generally survive very long. Occasionally you get a spate of sightings then the dry up - probably an escape died in a ditch somewhere. It is implausible that they ever breed.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 11:24am
I remember fixing punctures in my back garden 25 years ago and I am "only" 40 now.

I still remmeber the bike I learned to ride a bike on.

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 11:15am
A question about VAT, etc. Are you saying that in addition to the 20% charged by HMRC the Post Office charge an additional £8 for collecting it?

I'm afraid so! (Info here: https://personal.help.royalmail.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/143/~/when-you-have-a-fee-to-pay-grey-card.)

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 11:08am
Thanks for replies, happy to have any more feedback.

A question about VAT, etc. Are you saying that in addition to the 20% charged by HMRC the Post Office charge an additional £8 for collecting it?

It might be worth getting it posted to friends in Oz and sent to me as a present (which they owe me, so not a tax dodge).

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:49am
I'm currently having a similar dither. Do I use my cheap no-name small single panniers on a weekend tour so I can carry them more easily, use the axle-mounted bungees to attach bags to the rack top and risk them getting up to their old tricks (bent/broken hooks, trying to sag their corners into the wheel or bounce off, and so on), or do I take the bigger and sturdier Basil Mara double panniers and just deal with needing extra luggage straps to attach anything to the rack top and the relative awkwardness of carrying a double off the bike? What would more experienced tourists do?

Re: What camera?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:28am
Graham wrote:Five years after the start of this topic. I would expect products to have advanced significantly.
I've moved on from my original bulletcam/dogcam (internal battery has died - still not got around to trying to replace it - it's a puny 200mAh anyway IIRC) to one of the MD80 clones, from ebay seller itzone-uk. It seems to be a #25 internally, rather than the #3 reported on the MD80 page. Buying them is a bit like playing a tombola, though - it's fairly cheap to enter and fairly good chance of winning but not risk-free.

The big advantage over my old camera and the reason I put up with its foibles is that this one will run from USB power (simply switch the camera on after connecting power, then use as normal), which means I'm not subject to the internal battery being small or getting old - I run it from a 2100mAh USB power pack. After about seven hours, my 16Gb micro SD card is full anyway, long before the power pack has run down.

The power pack and camera both get fixed to the handlebars with rubbery 8s like http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cycling-Bike- ... 1938155833 which is one of the foibles I mentioned. There are handlebar mounts available for the MD80, including waterproof ones, but you can't often connect USB power while it's in them.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:22am
I've only ever had one puncture outside a bike shop, about thirty years ago...
I had just dismounted to gaze at a two wheeled fantasy in bright red in the window when there was a sudden detonation wrecking tyre, tube, and buckling the wheel Most expensive puncture I have ever had!

Ever since having a crank literally snap in two directly outside a bike shop, I've been firmly of the opinion that somewhere in orbit is a satellite controlled by LBS union headquarters beneath a volcano in the Pacific. It is programmed to zap unsuspecting riders just as they pass a subscribing repairer.

Re: Is this Justice for killing some one?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:13am
LollyKat wrote:But we don't know that she filtered up the inside after he had stopped - she may have been at the light first. He wasn't indicating, and not looking properly (admits to tidying his cab), so not exactly paying attention. There have been several cases where lorry drivers have run over cyclists that have been in front of them. Not just lorry drivers, either.

I think that you are right to distinguish between the two scenarios of the lorry overtaking the cyclist, and the cyclist trying to pass the lorry on the inside. We don't know which of these is correct, so we can't assume that the sentencing was wrong.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:04am
Neilo wrote:So many people came past me, I'm not that fast, with rattles, creaks, strange noises and my pet hate, when it happens to me I have to sort it straight away, ticking derailleurs.
I'm with you and I'm forever trying to figure out what any noise is, as soon as it happens, before it does worse damage (sadly, some I've left too long and I've chipped paint to show for it ) but I've realised some things from riding with many newcomers over the last few years: Some riders have much worse hearing than others and simply don't hear it. Some just have no mechanical sympathy. Some riders have been told by bad shops that the noise is nothing to worry about and only ride with more experienced people at sportives.

ANTONISH wrote:I'm always bemused by this inability to fix a puncture. How would he get on if he punctured while on a ride?
Many of them walk, pushing the bike. I've asked a few such people if they're OK as I ride pass, but most of them are doing short distances so they prefer to walk the bike home or to work and ask a relative or friend to help fix it.

Vantage wrote:You'll care if one crashes his/her bike into you because they couldn't adjust the brakes.
All the squeaks and rattles mean you can hear them coming and get out of the way of most of them well in advance... also, they either crash into stuff long before they get near anyone else or they've learned to cope with it - coasting to a stop aided by the - err - higher friction of a broken bike, or (ab)using their shoe soles.

freeflow wrote:It's a weird phenomenon but my car gets by as best it can with an mot and service whenever. My bike is fettled and tender washed and polished at least once a week. Can't abide noisy bikes.
Cars were always fiddlier than bikes but modern cars are even more difficult now so they need to be very low-maintenance, even more so than sensible hub-geared hub-braked commuter bikes.
Syndicate content
 
  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: SC042541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.

Copyright © CTC 2016

Terms and Conditions