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Re: A positive thread

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:31pm
MikeF wrote:Rode 30 miles yesterday mainly on roads in central Sussex and all drivers, including a bus, van with very large trailer and high powered sports car, overtook me with comfortable clearance - except one - a driving instructor!

Interesting.

I recently moved to the North East (Newcastle Upon Tyne) from London. I found cycling in London pretty good (mostly a joy, in fact), but I have noticed here that drivers tend to be very considerate when it comes to cyclists. Perhaps this is because they haven't yet encountered the kind of bad behaviour that one often sees from cyclists in London? I've been here 6 months and have yet to see an aggressive jumping of lights, for example.

I assume that it was the driving instructor driving, rather than a learner? I often encounter learner drivers because the main cycle route out of Newcastle towards the coast has a couple of sections which are popular with learners because they are quiet stretches. I waited a full 5 minutes last week as a learner driver attempted a three point turn (okay, it was a fourteen point turn), but I thought, "This is bread on the water". Consideration on the road works in both directions.

I must day that I have found this thread strangely calming to read... Thanks to the OP

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:14pm
Paulatic wrote:I used to stop at a lovely wee cafe in Straiton. Is it still there?
Yes it's still there, nice wee cafe indeed.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:56pm
Thanks. The Ballantrae route will be my outward journey and the Kirkmichael , Glentrool, Newton Stewart , New Luce route will be my return route. I think the road out of Dalrymple, Gallows Hill ?,and the Straiton to Glentrool road via the Davy Bell memorial at Rowantrees are magnificent and as I think of them I know why I love cycle touring. Unfortunately the Minnigaff/Newton Stewart is no longer open to solo travellers....it is up for sale! Thanks again.

Re: Route Advice Bath to Warwick and Lincoln to Warwick

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:51pm
If you skirt the north of Leicester and up towards Lincoln you could go the way to Lincoln that I did. I was quite happy with my route from Leicester to Lincoln through places such as Harby, Bottesford, and and other villages. Easy to miss all the major urban areas such as Melton Mowbray, Newark on Trent, Grantham, etc. You don't need to go too far out of Leicester to avoid the overly urban bits which straightens out the route a bit.

However, I'm a slow rider. So, you may be looking for different types of roads than the country lanes I prefer.

EDIT: Reverse direction in the description above! You're going from Lincoln to Warwick, I went the other way.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:04pm
Cairnryan to Ballantrae first day. If you don't mind a few miles of landrover track, you can turn off the main road about 1 mile north of Cairnryan, just as the A77 starts to swing inland, and take back roads into Ballantrae (around 12 miles, the first half unsurfaced but decent, the 2nd half single track surfaced; and it gets you off the busy A77).

Overnight in Ballantrae, then head up to Pinwhirry>Pinmore>Barr and then join National Cycle Route 7, all the way to Ardrossan. It's a few miles longer than the main road, but take a in some nice scenery, and it's pretty much all on quiet roads.

Re: Route Advice Bath to Warwick and Lincoln to Warwick

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:40pm
Thanks everyone. Advice gratefully received.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:19pm
Good hostel in Newton Stewart.
Stayed there on my Scottish end to end, 2 years ago.
Popped down to Mull of Galloway from there.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:10pm
661-Pete wrote:It may have changed its territory and be ranging further afield.Currently in Worcestershire
http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/news/144 ... t_attack_/

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:01pm
I used to stop at a lovely wee cafe in Straiton. Is it still there?

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:59pm
iviehoff wrote: ....... For example the lion caught in Scotland........
Which lion was this?

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 6:44pm
Cairnryan, minor roads via New Luce to Newton Stewart, Glentrool, Straiton, Kirkmichael, Ayr, Troon, then your normal route to Ardrossan.
Accommodation options in Newton Stewart.

Re: The worst training route ever?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:27pm
Hi quilkin,
It looks like you were even worse off for a decent route than I was. At least I had fairly good access to El Teide through Guia de Isora and Chio. I went up the volcano after the snow,(in the car,) and it looked magnificent. It's a pity that where the best views were, you couldn't park.
Regards...

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:15pm
ANTONISH wrote:I'm always bemused by this inability to fix a puncture. How would he get on if he punctured while on a ride?
I learned to fix punctures as a child soon after the second world war. Virtually everybody cycled - few had cars. It was an everyday skill.
Perhaps it should be taught in school

There is another aspect of this.
I now have high pressure tyres. My hands, though stronger than many, are really not strong enough to get the tyres back on the rims if I have to change a tube. In fact, I've stopped bothering carrying a spare tube etc as there isn't any point. I used to mend my own punctures when I had lower tyre pressures, but now I can't.
It's not all ignorance. It's a bit like cars- lots of maintenance we used to do you can no longer do on modern engines.

I know this is tempting fate, but in over 30 years of cycling I've never had a p*** that I couldn't cycle home on, even when commuting in London every day, except one which happened at the end of the street I live on. The only time I couldn't get home after an 'issue' was when my 20+ year old derailleur exploded into my back wheel, trashing the wheel and bending the frame. No amount of skill could have mended that one in situ. And according to the LBS, no amount of maintenance could have avoided it- a pivot invisible to inspection had just worn through.

(I have to say in my defence that I like all machinery to be silent and smooth, so I clean and lubricate the bike regularly and get a gold star for my routine maintenance when I take it in for its yearly service. I can't understand people who don't notice nasty noises from their car or bike. One friend asked me to check her bike as it wasn't going well- she'd had it six months or so and said it was getting more and more difficult to ride. It was a hub gear, and I'd never had one of those, but I said I'd look at it, and before getting my hands mucky asked how long it had been since she oiled it. The answer 'oiled?' told me all I needed to know. A bit of 3 in 1 on the chain (this was donkeys' years ago) and it went like a bird again.)

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:07pm
Vorpal wrote:I'm not sure that I understand why it's odd for a woman to have written it. I have never felt particularly at risk by the side of the road. While I understand why some people feel that way, I should think that it applies to anyone who feels vulnerable, and not just or necessarily women. In any case being able to fix a puncture at the side of the road won't be the best solution for all of those who feel vulnerable.
It comes down to personal history I suppose - I used to know a fair number of women whose main concern about any sort of transport failure would have been the question of increased vulnerability.
I do appreciate that not every one can repair a bike by, the roadside or elsewhere. I also understand that getting the toolkit out then and there isn't always an appropriate solution. But its good to have the option, where possible. Someone waiting by, or pushing a broken bike is always going to look vulnerable to some extent and there are people about who will readily pick up on it. Someone getting on with repair work may well be as vulnerable but the signals sent out are more like "here is a person who copes..."
In general I think that "you too can learn to ride a bike and cope with the common problems" is a better message than just "you too can learn to ride a bike". I don't think that offering to show folk how to cope with common problems disadvantages anyone - as long as you don't imply that it might.

Re: The worst training route ever?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:06pm
whoof wrote:Best place to do the interval sessions is as mentioned above is a turbo-trainer. Also some way of measuring output is useful, power is best if not HR though this lags behind effort especially one 1 minute intervals.
I know it's boring, it's also a bit miserable but if you want to go faster.

I used to do intervals on a set of wooden rollers back in the 1950s except mine were go all out for 1 minute and recover for 4, then repeat for one hour. Wattage output measurement would be great but I really can't justify spending hundreds of pounds on a turbo when my sporting life is coming to an end.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 5:52pm
I remember fixing punctures in my back garden 25 years ago and I am "only" 40 now
I got my first proper bike age 8 during WW2. Dad was in the army and if I got a puncture I had to wait till he came home on leave to mend it. After several such occurrences I decided I could do it myself, but somehow it didn't work. When Dad came home he found multiple holes due to me using a spoon handle to replace the tyre. Mum wasn't too happy as the handle was bent

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 5:47pm
BrianFox wrote:Ever since having a crank literally snap in two directly outside a bike shop, I've been firmly of the opinion that somewhere in orbit is a satellite controlled by LBS union headquarters beneath a volcano in the Pacific. It is programmed to zap unsuspecting riders just as they pass a subscribing repairer.
I know exactly where you are coming from.
And a good conspiracy theory can get you through the week with a smile on your face

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 5:26pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
In the past I have had a police man shake his fist at me.
Not in a million years would this happen today and get away with it.

I am with Mick F on this they work for us like MP's should also not for them selves, I have several police in the family so I know they are very normal and do what the rest of us do BUT they should not act this way when on duty in full view for sure.

TBH I didn't find a lot wrong with the police officer in the video OK he was a bit forthright in his admonishment,but the cyclist was a twonk both in his riding and attitude IMHO.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 5:05pm
I got a pair of small Carradice Carradry. They were carracrap.
The pannier rack catches all lost their rivets in no time at all which was a PITA on a tour.
They are waterproof up to a point but not 100% which means in heavy weather it gets in and stays in. A much better option is water resistant - with stuff packed in poly bags if you anticipate any bad weather. Or Ortleib with the rollover tops.

Front panniers are best avoided except if very light loaded. If too heavy you can get an adverse pendulum effect which can make going up a hill more difficult

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 4:46pm
mjr wrote:MrsHJ wrote:I don't think I would categorise myself as experienced in such illustrious company but I've spent far too much time trying to extract bits of shredded bungee from various parts of the rear derallieur etc I find for regular trips my kids bags that are mounted with clips and then have an elastic retainer bit at the bottom can have the elastic bit shorn off to avoid the inevitable "mummy, my rear wheel won't turn".
More experienced than me! In thirty-mumble years cycling, I've only ever done day trips or the very occasional overnight, where I feel I can get away with fewer clothes and tools than a long weekend.

I may be being dim, but I'm interpreting the above as advice to go for the double panniers because they're less trouble on the bike. Even if I use my bungees with the smaller singles, there's little chance of getting them stuck in anything because their ends are connected to the axle http://brilliantbikes.co.uk/accessories ... avert.html and no chance that they'll foul my rear derailleur because I don't have one on that bike.

I would say that all in all we are happy with the small pair of panniers (they are from SJS and are currently on sale at £9.99-30 litres a pair) and fit the kids/adults bikes and carry a modest amount but enough to be useful. They are not weighty at all unlike my bomb proof Ortliebs.

However they have 2 drawbacks- one is no rain cover included and second is the aforementioned elastic clips at the bottom are not designed for the smaller frame on a child's bike which can lead to problems. I have now cut them off. Ps I really like those bungees you have!
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