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Re: Putting tight tyres back on...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 10:44am
I too had a lot of difficulty putting tyres back on sometimes - so now I keep one of these in each of my seatbags -

http://www.cyclebasket.com/m23b0s281p92 ... yre_Levers

It puts the tyre back on reasonably easily - but can be difficult to disengage from the tyre afterwards!

--Jatinder

Re: Increasing restrictions on conveying cycles on trains

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:29am
As a footnote to the earlier discussion, I've been in contact with GWR about the rules for folding bikes on long-distance trains from May. Their leaflet/website say a maximum wheel size of 18in, which rules out almost anything but a Brompton, and is contrary to pretty much any other train company. I've now had confirmation that this will be revised to 20in.

In practice I don't envisage there being a problem on non-rush hour trains even with larger-wheeled folders (such as Airnimals), especially if bagged. But it's good to know that most folders are officially ok.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 10:20am
TBH cycling is like people,many and varied,one extreme is worlds away from the other.
Cycle commuting in a city or urban area isn't at all like riding the Karakum highway.Smart suited individuals on roadsters aren't going to want to start taking wheels out and mending punctures by the roadside and so will guard against that by fitting M+ type tyres on a practically maintenance free fully enclosed chain IGH,hub braked,bike that may be heavy but bombproof.
Others who are riding out in the countryside for the shear fun of it,on a regular basis would do well to learn some basic get you home skills,especially if their rescue person is a good few miles away or has other things to do.
There can be no doubt that sometime somewhere when you least expect or want it you'll suffer either a mechanical breakdown or more likely a puncture.
Minimising that eventuality by regular maintenance is good practice IMO,learning how to at least repair a puncture is a bare minimum,unless you always have someone on hand to come and pick you and your bike up or ride with someone daft enough to do the job for you everytime it happens.
I can understand that some folk don't want to do regular maintenance but they must suffer the consequences of that,or expect others to pull them out of the mire.
Either can be extremely an disappointing situation to find one's self in.

Claiming not to be able to do the basics,unless it's because of physical disability,is an excuse frankly.

Re: Increasing restrictions on conveying cycles on trains

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:04am
Kernowboy wrote: I travelled by train from Cornwall to Passau last summer to ride the Danube trail, returning from Vienna via Munich, Amsterdam, Hook of Holland, Harwich, London to Truro. From this December the Amsterdam / Munich City Night Line is being withdrawn so this will not be possible in future .

Petition against the closure of City Night Line at viewtopic.php?f=16&t=105529

City Night Line closure: petition

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:01am
Deutsche Bahn are planning to close the whole City Night Line sleeper train network from December 2016. CNL trains connect cities in Holland, Germany, Switzerland and the Czech Republic and so are of considerable use to UK touring cyclists wanting to reach many parts of central Europe. The Paris - Munich and Paris - Berlin services have already been closed. Sleeper trains are of particular interest to cyclists as they usually have large cycle carrying spaces, and so are more convenient for cycle carriage than many of the high-speed trains that form the daytime services.

Concerned cyclists may wish to sign a petition against the closures, at: https://weact.campact.de/petitions/rett ... autozuge-1
There is text in English below the German text. For the signing box 'Vorname' is 'first name', 'Nachname' is 'surname' and 'postleitzahl' is 'postcode'.

Those motivated to do more might, like myself, contact your MEP about it.

Re: What camera?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:56am
mjr wrote:The MD80 I use was £6. The battery pack £3. The bungees £2. The class 10 memory card cost as much as the rest put together

What's the recorded footage like? I saw a youtube review where it was very jerky. Maybe a one off?

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:29am
Lance Dopestrong wrote:A 10 mile walk is no more physically onerous than a 10 mile bike ride.

Not all walks and bike rides are born equal.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:10am
Flinders wrote:ANTONISH wrote:I'm always bemused by this inability to fix a puncture. How would he get on if he punctured while on a ride?
I learned to fix punctures as a child soon after the second world war. Virtually everybody cycled - few had cars. It was an everyday skill.
Perhaps it should be taught in school

There is another aspect of this.
I now have high pressure tyres. My hands, though stronger than many, are really not strong enough to get the tyres back on the rims if I have to change a tube. In fact, I've stopped bothering carrying a spare tube etc as there isn't any point. I used to mend my own punctures when I had lower tyre pressures, but now I can't.
It's not all ignorance. It's a bit like cars- lots of maintenance we used to do you can no longer do on modern engines.

I know this is tempting fate, but in over 30 years of cycling I've never had a p*** that I couldn't cycle home on, even when commuting in London every day, except one which happened at the end of the street I live on. The only time I couldn't get home after an 'issue' was when my 20+ year old derailleur exploded into my back wheel, trashing the wheel and bending the frame. No amount of skill could have mended that one in situ. And according to the LBS, no amount of maintenance could have avoided it- a pivot invisible to inspection had just worn through.



This has been covered in an earlier thread.
I've got quite strong hands and can usually put a tyre back on without levers.
However I have been beaten on occasion. The first time being a cold wet day when I gave up and used the tyre levers.
Subsequently I've used tyre levers on a number of occasions. With the inner tube slightly inflated and taking care it isn't at all difficult to replace the tyre without damaging anything.
IMO the conception that tyres MUST be put on using only ones hands is erroneous.
My tyre levers are very thin Michelin yellow plastic. I don't know what they are made of but they seem almost indestructible - I've had them at least 15years (free with a magazine
There is also a gadget for exactly the task of replacing the tyre - not sure of the name.
If you have always been able to get home with a slow puncture you have been very lucky.
BTW I've found myself doing a roadside chain repair for a number of individuals over the years - even a temporary re-riveting of a 10sp chain when the individual wasn't carrying the
required "strong link?" - that is another relatively simple task I would encourage cyclists to learn.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 12:17am
Some 700 tyres go on very easily, the problem comes when the tyre and rim are at opposite ends of the tolerated specifications. I have been known to take a wheel into the LBS and try several tyres on it to find the easiest fitting one.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 11:33pm
cooper_coleraine wrote:For a number of years my son and I have done a tour of the Inner Hebrides and Kintyre. We crossed from Larne to Troon .....

Might be an alternative, but weather dependent.... http://www.kintyreexpress.com/ferry%20service.html

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 11:02pm
baghwallah wrote:I agree, to an extent, with ASTONISH and Flinders, and indeed most posters.

I am a hybrid sort of chap, but for complicated reasons am currently riding a road bike with high pressure tyres and deep rims. Getting the tyre off almost makes me want to weep sometimes, but luckily my cycling is now mainly for pleasure (rather than commuting) so when it takes half an hour, then so be it. I'm just amazed that I haven't broken any spokes yet. On the other hand, I'm sure Flinders approves of people knowing how to repair punctures (as he clearly does).



I'm female, actually We seem to be of the same mind, possibly because my reasons for riding a high-pressure-tyre type bike are also complicated (in my case, I'm too small for most bike frames, and this one was the only one small enough I could find). Even the big mechanic at my LBS had a struggle with my tyre last time, and his opinion was that with my smaller hands I'd have be unlikely to be able to deal with it myself (and he's no sexist, far from it, just a practical chap). I have fairly strong and dexterous claws for a female due to my job and hobbies, and frequently have to help out colleagues (and even strapping male students in ye olde days) with stubborn bits of kit like lids and bolts, but these modern tyres are beyond me.

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:38pm
I just need to know one thing... Was this filmed with a head/helmet mounted camera?

If it was, then he didn't look behind once. Okay, the policeman was a See-You-Next-Tuesday, but the cyclist was hardly a hero.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:25pm
You could try just the front panniers - do a test run. I liked them when I wanted to carry stuff with my not-really-built-for-luggage Vitus 979 bike in the 80s & early 90s.

Alternatively, how about a rack bag?

If Carradice don't do big enough there's a Topeak one that has drop down side panniers that takes its capacity to 22l. It is water resistant rather than waterproof but you can get a waterproof cover if you want more protection. I've been using a couple of Topeak bags for several years and am pleased with them.

You can combine a rack bag with panniers too - when I've done a fixed base weekend I've sometimes taken the stuff for the weekend in panniers plus the rack bag to use on the day rides.

Rick.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:24pm
I agree, to an extent, with ASTONISH and Flinders, and indeed most posters.

I am a hybrid sort of chap, but for complicated reasons am currently riding a road bike with high pressure tyres and deep rims. Getting the tyre off almost makes me want to weep sometimes, but luckily my cycling is now mainly for pleasure (rather than commuting) so when it takes half an hour, then so be it. I'm just amazed that I haven't broken any spokes yet. On the other hand, I'm sure Flinders approves of people knowing how to repair punctures (as he clearly does).

There are some elephants in the room in this thread.

There are some badly maintained bikes on the road, no doubt. Now, I am a 'leisure' cyclist who gets a bit frightened above 24mph — 'what if my carbon forks collapse?'... ''What if my quick release comes undone?' Yet, like the OP, I frequently come across other cyclists (in my case, far more serious cyclists) whose machines are creaking. I don't understand it. Last week I got a puncture in rural Northumberland and, for the first time in my life, exhausted my CO2, so I needed a pump, which I didn't have. I walked four miles to the nearest bike shop (Dixons in Whitley Bay — an excellent place) and asked 15 cyclists if they had a pump. Not one did. I didn't either, but that was a forgetful mistake. The people I asked were not just people on bikes, but people clad in lycra, some of them in overshoes and arm-warners. That I do not understand. How can one have the foresight to put on arm-warmers but fail to carry a means of pumping up one's tyres? (and yes, I know I can't talk.)

But we should be careful. The next stage, for a politician of such a mind, will be MOTs for bikes and compulsory insurance, like cars. An awful lot of cyclists are middle class people riding machines that cost over £1000. We must never lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons that the bicycle is one of the world's greatest inventions is that it is a low cost form of transport for the poor. With a bicycle,. someone can commute to a job five miles away for free which might cost almost £100 per month on the bus. The effects of bad cycle maintenance will fall upon the rider, rather than other road users.

On the other hand, ASTONISH has a point. Mending a puncture is a basic skill. So is riding a bike. When I ride, I still recall my Cycling Proficiency training from the early 1980s. (The only thing I don't do now is the flapping right arm to signal slowing to a stop.)

It would be nice to suggest that cyclists with a bit of time on their hands could offer their services to schools to teach kids how to ride bikes and look after them, but with child protection and risk assessment procedures, that is probably an impossible dream. The best bet would be for cycling clubs to lay on family days (so kids come with a parent) where such things can be taught.

Some LBS's do free 'MOTs' of children's bikes too, which is a sensible policy. If little Johnny (or little Jenny) brings his (or her) bike in for a service, Mum or Dad probably will too, and it establishes a habit.

Re: Any such thing as an easyish N Portugal cycle camping to

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:16pm
I'm riding a solo End to End in Portugal in September into Faro out of Porto.
I did this, Porto to Faro in October 2014.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:15pm
ortlieb front panniers. bombproof, waterproof, and enough space for warm clothing, or smart clothing for evenings, space for spare grub, bottles of wine for hosts, etc. just because they can carry lots doesn't mean you have to have lots with you, but it's very good to have the option. they are small enough to be neat, i used them for several fortnight-long tours, using hotels. anything non-waterproof is an utter pain. unless you're cycling in the sahara, obvs.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:55pm
Given the limited weight you'll be carrying for a weekend of B&Bing, I would have thought one pannier wouldn't feel unbalanced, but if you do feel the need for something else I'd recommend Ortlieb Sports Packers which are lovely little things, that are easy to clip off and carry into your overnight accommodation. I've actually done week long hostel tours with a pair and at 15 litres each, there's plenty of room.

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:47pm
Hi,
You would expect us lot to be a bit thick / hard headed as we get older
But the first response to use a better word to the cyclist "what do you want mate?" was "I am not you mate" that is a typical retort from some one who is confronted in the street when an offending driver does not get his way with bad driving.
They get out of there car and say "Whats your problem mate" and you reply I am not your mate, well I have anyway.

Not the sort of response you would expect from the copper being the first words he muttered.
You might expect it mid conversation.

I understand the copper got increasingly frustrated, even if you say the cyclist was a twonk............don't they see far worse daily in their job, how would they handle that.

Anyway we are all the down trodden when we run the gauntlet of mounting our bikes, surviving to old age is some feat for sure
No biggy just my opinion

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:45pm
Felt the need to offer some 'words' to someone on their bike today as they passed me while waiting in a traffic queue, zipped through the narrow gap between cars, ran the red light that we stopped at and on up the road. Shorlty after the light turned green and the rest of us more conscientious road users set off. I was quite surprised to then find myself catching up with Mr RLJumper who was now going quite slowly up the hill riding on a narrow pavement - bare in mind I am not any kind of Wiggo and I am riding a long john cargo bike. As I draw level I say 'Excuse me but riding like that give us all a bad name and make life harder for the rest of us' The dull uncomprehending look he gave told me two things. 1. I was wasting my breath, 2. If his hands weren't on the handlebars they would be dragging on the pavement.
I think today was a bit more rubbish than usual - at least two close passes and one deliberate punishment pass complete with revving engine and horn blowing, and two people driving straight at me on my side of the road to get past parked cars rather than stopping to let me by first.

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:31pm
Anyone do anything similar to the ground effect bodybag? In the EU, while we have it?
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