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Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 11:02pm
baghwallah wrote:I agree, to an extent, with ASTONISH and Flinders, and indeed most posters.

I am a hybrid sort of chap, but for complicated reasons am currently riding a road bike with high pressure tyres and deep rims. Getting the tyre off almost makes me want to weep sometimes, but luckily my cycling is now mainly for pleasure (rather than commuting) so when it takes half an hour, then so be it. I'm just amazed that I haven't broken any spokes yet. On the other hand, I'm sure Flinders approves of people knowing how to repair punctures (as he clearly does).



I'm female, actually We seem to be of the same mind, possibly because my reasons for riding a high-pressure-tyre type bike are also complicated (in my case, I'm too small for most bike frames, and this one was the only one small enough I could find). Even the big mechanic at my LBS had a struggle with my tyre last time, and his opinion was that with my smaller hands I'd have be unlikely to be able to deal with it myself (and he's no sexist, far from it, just a practical chap). I have fairly strong and dexterous claws for a female due to my job and hobbies, and frequently have to help out colleagues (and even strapping male students in ye olde days) with stubborn bits of kit like lids and bolts, but these modern tyres are beyond me.

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:38pm
I just need to know one thing... Was this filmed with a head/helmet mounted camera?

If it was, then he didn't look behind once. Okay, the policeman was a See-You-Next-Tuesday, but the cyclist was hardly a hero.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:25pm
You could try just the front panniers - do a test run. I liked them when I wanted to carry stuff with my not-really-built-for-luggage Vitus 979 bike in the 80s & early 90s.

Alternatively, how about a rack bag?

If Carradice don't do big enough there's a Topeak one that has drop down side panniers that takes its capacity to 22l. It is water resistant rather than waterproof but you can get a waterproof cover if you want more protection. I've been using a couple of Topeak bags for several years and am pleased with them.

You can combine a rack bag with panniers too - when I've done a fixed base weekend I've sometimes taken the stuff for the weekend in panniers plus the rack bag to use on the day rides.

Rick.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 10:24pm
I agree, to an extent, with ASTONISH and Flinders, and indeed most posters.

I am a hybrid sort of chap, but for complicated reasons am currently riding a road bike with high pressure tyres and deep rims. Getting the tyre off almost makes me want to weep sometimes, but luckily my cycling is now mainly for pleasure (rather than commuting) so when it takes half an hour, then so be it. I'm just amazed that I haven't broken any spokes yet. On the other hand, I'm sure Flinders approves of people knowing how to repair punctures (as he clearly does).

There are some elephants in the room in this thread.

There are some badly maintained bikes on the road, no doubt. Now, I am a 'leisure' cyclist who gets a bit frightened above 24mph — 'what if my carbon forks collapse?'... ''What if my quick release comes undone?' Yet, like the OP, I frequently come across other cyclists (in my case, far more serious cyclists) whose machines are creaking. I don't understand it. Last week I got a puncture in rural Northumberland and, for the first time in my life, exhausted my CO2, so I needed a pump, which I didn't have. I walked four miles to the nearest bike shop (Dixons in Whitley Bay — an excellent place) and asked 15 cyclists if they had a pump. Not one did. I didn't either, but that was a forgetful mistake. The people I asked were not just people on bikes, but people clad in lycra, some of them in overshoes and arm-warners. That I do not understand. How can one have the foresight to put on arm-warmers but fail to carry a means of pumping up one's tyres? (and yes, I know I can't talk.)

But we should be careful. The next stage, for a politician of such a mind, will be MOTs for bikes and compulsory insurance, like cars. An awful lot of cyclists are middle class people riding machines that cost over £1000. We must never lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons that the bicycle is one of the world's greatest inventions is that it is a low cost form of transport for the poor. With a bicycle,. someone can commute to a job five miles away for free which might cost almost £100 per month on the bus. The effects of bad cycle maintenance will fall upon the rider, rather than other road users.

On the other hand, ASTONISH has a point. Mending a puncture is a basic skill. So is riding a bike. When I ride, I still recall my Cycling Proficiency training from the early 1980s. (The only thing I don't do now is the flapping right arm to signal slowing to a stop.)

It would be nice to suggest that cyclists with a bit of time on their hands could offer their services to schools to teach kids how to ride bikes and look after them, but with child protection and risk assessment procedures, that is probably an impossible dream. The best bet would be for cycling clubs to lay on family days (so kids come with a parent) where such things can be taught.

Some LBS's do free 'MOTs' of children's bikes too, which is a sensible policy. If little Johnny (or little Jenny) brings his (or her) bike in for a service, Mum or Dad probably will too, and it establishes a habit.

Re: Any such thing as an easyish N Portugal cycle camping to

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:16pm
I'm riding a solo End to End in Portugal in September into Faro out of Porto.
I did this, Porto to Faro in October 2014.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 10:15pm
ortlieb front panniers. bombproof, waterproof, and enough space for warm clothing, or smart clothing for evenings, space for spare grub, bottles of wine for hosts, etc. just because they can carry lots doesn't mean you have to have lots with you, but it's very good to have the option. they are small enough to be neat, i used them for several fortnight-long tours, using hotels. anything non-waterproof is an utter pain. unless you're cycling in the sahara, obvs.

Re: Panniers for weekend tours

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:55pm
Given the limited weight you'll be carrying for a weekend of B&Bing, I would have thought one pannier wouldn't feel unbalanced, but if you do feel the need for something else I'd recommend Ortlieb Sports Packers which are lovely little things, that are easy to clip off and carry into your overnight accommodation. I've actually done week long hostel tours with a pair and at 15 litres each, there's plenty of room.

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:47pm
Hi,
You would expect us lot to be a bit thick / hard headed as we get older
But the first response to use a better word to the cyclist "what do you want mate?" was "I am not you mate" that is a typical retort from some one who is confronted in the street when an offending driver does not get his way with bad driving.
They get out of there car and say "Whats your problem mate" and you reply I am not your mate, well I have anyway.

Not the sort of response you would expect from the copper being the first words he muttered.
You might expect it mid conversation.

I understand the copper got increasingly frustrated, even if you say the cyclist was a twonk............don't they see far worse daily in their job, how would they handle that.

Anyway we are all the down trodden when we run the gauntlet of mounting our bikes, surviving to old age is some feat for sure
No biggy just my opinion

Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:45pm
Felt the need to offer some 'words' to someone on their bike today as they passed me while waiting in a traffic queue, zipped through the narrow gap between cars, ran the red light that we stopped at and on up the road. Shorlty after the light turned green and the rest of us more conscientious road users set off. I was quite surprised to then find myself catching up with Mr RLJumper who was now going quite slowly up the hill riding on a narrow pavement - bare in mind I am not any kind of Wiggo and I am riding a long john cargo bike. As I draw level I say 'Excuse me but riding like that give us all a bad name and make life harder for the rest of us' The dull uncomprehending look he gave told me two things. 1. I was wasting my breath, 2. If his hands weren't on the handlebars they would be dragging on the pavement.
I think today was a bit more rubbish than usual - at least two close passes and one deliberate punishment pass complete with revving engine and horn blowing, and two people driving straight at me on my side of the road to get past parked cars rather than stopping to let me by first.

Re: Groundeffect Bodybag. Any thoughts and where to buy

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:31pm
Anyone do anything similar to the ground effect bodybag? In the EU, while we have it?

Re: A positive thread

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 9:31pm
MikeF wrote:Rode 30 miles yesterday mainly on roads in central Sussex and all drivers, including a bus, van with very large trailer and high powered sports car, overtook me with comfortable clearance - except one - a driving instructor!

Interesting.

I recently moved to the North East (Newcastle Upon Tyne) from London. I found cycling in London pretty good (mostly a joy, in fact), but I have noticed here that drivers tend to be very considerate when it comes to cyclists. Perhaps this is because they haven't yet encountered the kind of bad behaviour that one often sees from cyclists in London? I've been here 6 months and have yet to see an aggressive jumping of lights, for example.

I assume that it was the driving instructor driving, rather than a learner? I often encounter learner drivers because the main cycle route out of Newcastle towards the coast has a couple of sections which are popular with learners because they are quiet stretches. I waited a full 5 minutes last week as a learner driver attempted a three point turn (okay, it was a fourteen point turn), but I thought, "This is bread on the water". Consideration on the road works in both directions.

I must day that I have found this thread strangely calming to read... Thanks to the OP

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 9:14pm
Paulatic wrote:I used to stop at a lovely wee cafe in Straiton. Is it still there?
Yes it's still there, nice wee cafe indeed.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:56pm
Thanks. The Ballantrae route will be my outward journey and the Kirkmichael , Glentrool, Newton Stewart , New Luce route will be my return route. I think the road out of Dalrymple, Gallows Hill ?,and the Straiton to Glentrool road via the Davy Bell memorial at Rowantrees are magnificent and as I think of them I know why I love cycle touring. Unfortunately the Minnigaff/Newton Stewart is no longer open to solo travellers....it is up for sale! Thanks again.

Re: Route Advice Bath to Warwick and Lincoln to Warwick

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:51pm
If you skirt the north of Leicester and up towards Lincoln you could go the way to Lincoln that I did. I was quite happy with my route from Leicester to Lincoln through places such as Harby, Bottesford, and and other villages. Easy to miss all the major urban areas such as Melton Mowbray, Newark on Trent, Grantham, etc. You don't need to go too far out of Leicester to avoid the overly urban bits which straightens out the route a bit.

However, I'm a slow rider. So, you may be looking for different types of roads than the country lanes I prefer.

EDIT: Reverse direction in the description above! You're going from Lincoln to Warwick, I went the other way.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 8:04pm
Cairnryan to Ballantrae first day. If you don't mind a few miles of landrover track, you can turn off the main road about 1 mile north of Cairnryan, just as the A77 starts to swing inland, and take back roads into Ballantrae (around 12 miles, the first half unsurfaced but decent, the 2nd half single track surfaced; and it gets you off the busy A77).

Overnight in Ballantrae, then head up to Pinwhirry>Pinmore>Barr and then join National Cycle Route 7, all the way to Ardrossan. It's a few miles longer than the main road, but take a in some nice scenery, and it's pretty much all on quiet roads.

Re: Route Advice Bath to Warwick and Lincoln to Warwick

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:40pm
Thanks everyone. Advice gratefully received.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:19pm
Good hostel in Newton Stewart.
Stayed there on my Scottish end to end, 2 years ago.
Popped down to Mull of Galloway from there.

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 7:10pm
661-Pete wrote:It may have changed its territory and be ranging further afield.Currently in Worcestershire
http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/news/144 ... t_attack_/

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 7:01pm
I used to stop at a lovely wee cafe in Straiton. Is it still there?

Re: Large mystery animal

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 25 April 2016 - 6:59pm
iviehoff wrote: ....... For example the lion caught in Scotland........
Which lion was this?
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