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Re: Appropriate words of advice ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 12:15pm
Hi,
Yeh, no ones the hero but one is upholding the law and being paid too...........40 Grand plus.

The last Time I was threatened with arrest
I asked how this would happen (if I refused to answer questions, no charge and never was to be either).

Oh said PC I will go away and get some one to help me then I will come back

Do you think that I would still be there...............................

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:35am
reohn2 wrote:I've watched a certain female member of this forum repair a puncture on what appeared to be a tight fitting 23mm tyre without even chipping her nail varnish .
And brush off another member of the group in no uncertain terms which ended in, OFF*,who thought he would insist helping a lady in distress


*it wasn't me,I wouldn't have even dared

If I ever get a puncture in her presence, I think I may try fluttering my eyelids at her and saying "could anybody help me, there appears to be no air in my tyre and I have a small child to look after". As I really dont like getting my hands (or silk shirts) dirty while out on a ride.
Somehow I suspect that I will get the same polite refusal. Though if I just look at it for a few minutes she will crack as I am pretty sure that patience is the one (and only) aspect of life where I can beat her.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:28am
Lance Dopestrong wrote:A 10 mile walk is no more physically onerous than a 10 mile bike ride.
It really is. Most people who didn't cycle regularly but could actually ride would be able to manage 10 miles, albeit slowly, but if they weren't used to walking, 10 miles is a big ask. 10m on the bike for a novice would be what- an hour and a half at most? For a newbie walker, even on the flat 10 miles is going to be at least 2 1/2 hours according to Naismith, and much more tiring. I'd rather cycle 10 miles than walk 10 miles, and I'm a keen and very experienced walker.

Re: Putting tight tyres back on...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:21am
jatindersangha wrote:I too had a lot of difficulty putting tyres back on sometimes - so now I keep one of these in each of my seatbags -

http://www.cyclebasket.com/m23b0s281p92 ... yre_Levers

It puts the tyre back on reasonably easily - but can be difficult to disengage from the tyre afterwards!

--Jatinder
Thanks for that, I'll look into it. It's more helpful than saying people are lazy because they can't do something.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:21am
Hi,
david7591 wrote:Lance Dopestrong wrote:A 10 mile walk is no more physically onerous than a 10 mile bike ride.

Not all walks and bike rides are born equal.
Power walking, to me is unpathed moorland and add bad weather if you want. I track Ten Tors as I did it in my youth on the net and you will see fit 18 year olds and marines drop to 2mph when its bad weather.
I have run 15 miles in 1h25 but my training for such was 8.4 miles in 2.5hrs..............running through a forrest every sunday.
Cycling is a doddle compared to hill or moorland walking, running is a young mans sport and swimming is hard based on how hard it is to keep it up for hours, its all about weight bearing which cycling is very low.

Probably the same ones who think that a CF bike will make them go faster think preparation is what you do on an old or second hand bike.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:18am
reohn2 wrote:...............
I can understand that some folk don't want to do regular maintenance but they must suffer the consequences of that,or expect others to pull them out of the mire.
Either can be extremely an disappointing situation to find one's self in.

Claiming not to be able to do the basics,unless it's because of physical disability,is an excuse frankly.

No it is not an 'excuse'. I have no disability, and my hands are strong for my size and sex and a lot more than average when it comes to dexterity. I used to do my own punctures when I had different tyres/wheels. Which bit of 'I can't get those tyres back on however hard I try' is difficult to understand? When it comes to something anyone can do, like cleaning and lubrication, I do think it is a bit silly not to do it yourself, and even sillier not to at least ask someone to do it for you, but some things require more strength than I have.
Another example.
Modern car wheels are put on at the garage with set torques, and are pretty tight. With an ordinary lever, even if I jump on the lever with all my weight, I can't get the wheel nuts off. In that case, I bought an extension bar to give me more leverage, and so I can do it myself again (and I have). But with bike tyres/rims if tyre levers aren't enough, and for me they aren't, there is nothing more you can do. Oddly enough, I do several thousands of miles between puntures, and have never once yet had to get anyone out to get me home. I either rode home on them because they weren't too bad, or in the one case that wasn't posible, walked (as it was only a few hundred yards). I have no idea why some people get so many, or such bad ones.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 11:05am
ANTONISH wrote:This has been covered in an earlier thread.
I've got quite strong hands and can usually put a tyre back on without levers.
However I have been beaten on occasion. The first time being a cold wet day when I gave up and used the tyre levers.
Subsequently I've used tyre levers on a number of occasions. With the inner tube slightly inflated and taking care it isn't at all difficult to replace the tyre without damaging anything.
IMO the conception that tyres MUST be put on using only ones hands is erroneous.
My tyre levers are very thin Michelin yellow plastic. I don't know what they are made of but they seem almost indestructible - I've had them at least 15years (free with a magazine
There is also a gadget for exactly the task of replacing the tyre - not sure of the name.
If you have always been able to get home with a slow puncture you have been very lucky.
BTW I've found myself doing a roadside chain repair for a number of individuals over the years - even a temporary re-riveting of a 10sp chain when the individual wasn't carrying the
required "strong link?" - that is another relatively simple task I would encourage cyclists to learn.

Maybe 'not at all difficult' for you. Maybe your wheels-tyres are different to mine. But when the very strong mechanic at the LBS tells me he struggled to do them on this particular combination (and I'm sure he's heard of tyre levers) then I think that suggests it is not me being lazy or weedy. Like I said, I used to do them on my old bike, (and I did sometimes use levers) but I can't do them on this one.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 10:59am
I've watched a certain female member of this forum repair a puncture on what appeared to be a tight fitting 23mm tyre without even chipping her nail varnish .
And brush off another member of the group in no uncertain terms which ended in, OFF*,who thought he would insist helping a lady in distress


*it wasn't me,I wouldn't have even dared

Re: City Night Line closure: petition

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:53am
Done. Thanks for the heads up.

Hi all! Cycling to Greece this summer!

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:47am
Hello!

I've joined this forum to do as much research as I can on long distance cycling and hopefully bag myself a decent second hand tourer.

My brother, a friend and myself are cycling approximately 2200 miles to Athens this summer.

Our route will take us from Kent, across to Calais/Dunkirk, through Belgium and on to Germany on one of the Euro Velo routes. Past Cologne, Frankfurt and just outside Munich we'll join the Via Claudia Augusta.

This old roman path will take us up and over the alps, through Austria, and down to Venice. My brother will meet me and a friend here, before we continue around the north Adriatic coast.

Following another Euro Velo route, we'll pass through Croatia, Montenegro, Albania and on into Greece and finally end up in Athens.

Here we'll relax for up to a week before packing our bikes into boxes and flying home!

The whole trip should take around 6 weeks, leaving end of July and back in time for work starting on September 12th..

Cheers!

Re: Putting tight tyres back on...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 10:44am
I too had a lot of difficulty putting tyres back on sometimes - so now I keep one of these in each of my seatbags -

http://www.cyclebasket.com/m23b0s281p92 ... yre_Levers

It puts the tyre back on reasonably easily - but can be difficult to disengage from the tyre afterwards!

--Jatinder

Re: Increasing restrictions on conveying cycles on trains

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:29am
As a footnote to the earlier discussion, I've been in contact with GWR about the rules for folding bikes on long-distance trains from May. Their leaflet/website say a maximum wheel size of 18in, which rules out almost anything but a Brompton, and is contrary to pretty much any other train company. I've now had confirmation that this will be revised to 20in.

In practice I don't envisage there being a problem on non-rush hour trains even with larger-wheeled folders (such as Airnimals), especially if bagged. But it's good to know that most folders are officially ok.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 10:20am
TBH cycling is like people,many and varied,one extreme is worlds away from the other.
Cycle commuting in a city or urban area isn't at all like riding the Karakum highway.Smart suited individuals on roadsters aren't going to want to start taking wheels out and mending punctures by the roadside and so will guard against that by fitting M+ type tyres on a practically maintenance free fully enclosed chain IGH,hub braked,bike that may be heavy but bombproof.
Others who are riding out in the countryside for the shear fun of it,on a regular basis would do well to learn some basic get you home skills,especially if their rescue person is a good few miles away or has other things to do.
There can be no doubt that sometime somewhere when you least expect or want it you'll suffer either a mechanical breakdown or more likely a puncture.
Minimising that eventuality by regular maintenance is good practice IMO,learning how to at least repair a puncture is a bare minimum,unless you always have someone on hand to come and pick you and your bike up or ride with someone daft enough to do the job for you everytime it happens.
I can understand that some folk don't want to do regular maintenance but they must suffer the consequences of that,or expect others to pull them out of the mire.
Either can be extremely an disappointing situation to find one's self in.

Claiming not to be able to do the basics,unless it's because of physical disability,is an excuse frankly.

Re: Increasing restrictions on conveying cycles on trains

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:04am
Kernowboy wrote: I travelled by train from Cornwall to Passau last summer to ride the Danube trail, returning from Vienna via Munich, Amsterdam, Hook of Holland, Harwich, London to Truro. From this December the Amsterdam / Munich City Night Line is being withdrawn so this will not be possible in future .

Petition against the closure of City Night Line at viewtopic.php?f=16&t=105529

City Night Line closure: petition

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 April 2016 - 10:01am
Deutsche Bahn are planning to close the whole City Night Line sleeper train network from December 2016. CNL trains connect cities in Holland, Germany, Switzerland and the Czech Republic and so are of considerable use to UK touring cyclists wanting to reach many parts of central Europe. The Paris - Munich and Paris - Berlin services have already been closed. Sleeper trains are of particular interest to cyclists as they usually have large cycle carrying spaces, and so are more convenient for cycle carriage than many of the high-speed trains that form the daytime services.

Concerned cyclists may wish to sign a petition against the closures, at: https://weact.campact.de/petitions/rett ... autozuge-1
There is text in English below the German text. For the signing box 'Vorname' is 'first name', 'Nachname' is 'surname' and 'postleitzahl' is 'postcode'.

Those motivated to do more might, like myself, contact your MEP about it.

Re: What camera?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:56am
mjr wrote:The MD80 I use was £6. The battery pack £3. The bungees £2. The class 10 memory card cost as much as the rest put together

What's the recorded footage like? I saw a youtube review where it was very jerky. Maybe a one off?

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:29am
Lance Dopestrong wrote:A 10 mile walk is no more physically onerous than a 10 mile bike ride.

Not all walks and bike rides are born equal.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 9:10am
Flinders wrote:ANTONISH wrote:I'm always bemused by this inability to fix a puncture. How would he get on if he punctured while on a ride?
I learned to fix punctures as a child soon after the second world war. Virtually everybody cycled - few had cars. It was an everyday skill.
Perhaps it should be taught in school

There is another aspect of this.
I now have high pressure tyres. My hands, though stronger than many, are really not strong enough to get the tyres back on the rims if I have to change a tube. In fact, I've stopped bothering carrying a spare tube etc as there isn't any point. I used to mend my own punctures when I had lower tyre pressures, but now I can't.
It's not all ignorance. It's a bit like cars- lots of maintenance we used to do you can no longer do on modern engines.

I know this is tempting fate, but in over 30 years of cycling I've never had a p*** that I couldn't cycle home on, even when commuting in London every day, except one which happened at the end of the street I live on. The only time I couldn't get home after an 'issue' was when my 20+ year old derailleur exploded into my back wheel, trashing the wheel and bending the frame. No amount of skill could have mended that one in situ. And according to the LBS, no amount of maintenance could have avoided it- a pivot invisible to inspection had just worn through.



This has been covered in an earlier thread.
I've got quite strong hands and can usually put a tyre back on without levers.
However I have been beaten on occasion. The first time being a cold wet day when I gave up and used the tyre levers.
Subsequently I've used tyre levers on a number of occasions. With the inner tube slightly inflated and taking care it isn't at all difficult to replace the tyre without damaging anything.
IMO the conception that tyres MUST be put on using only ones hands is erroneous.
My tyre levers are very thin Michelin yellow plastic. I don't know what they are made of but they seem almost indestructible - I've had them at least 15years (free with a magazine
There is also a gadget for exactly the task of replacing the tyre - not sure of the name.
If you have always been able to get home with a slow puncture you have been very lucky.
BTW I've found myself doing a roadside chain repair for a number of individuals over the years - even a temporary re-riveting of a 10sp chain when the individual wasn't carrying the
required "strong link?" - that is another relatively simple task I would encourage cyclists to learn.

Re: Poor maintenance

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 26 April 2016 - 12:17am
Some 700 tyres go on very easily, the problem comes when the tyre and rim are at opposite ends of the tolerated specifications. I have been known to take a wheel into the LBS and try several tyres on it to find the easiest fitting one.

Re: Cairnryan to Ardrossan

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 25 April 2016 - 11:33pm
cooper_coleraine wrote:For a number of years my son and I have done a tour of the Inner Hebrides and Kintyre. We crossed from Larne to Troon .....

Might be an alternative, but weather dependent.... http://www.kintyreexpress.com/ferry%20service.html
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