Feed aggregator

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 4:26pm
Thanks for that. A day isn't complete until you learn something!

Strange that some economical cars produce more CO2.

Our Clio is rated at 170g per Km. So that must be directly proportional to the tested fuel consumption.
Our 500 is rated at 99g per Km.

Therefore, there must be a table or an equation to work this out?
Why have CO2 per Km as a figure when they could just use MPG?

I reckon (or at least I did reckon) that MPG and CO2 weren't directly related. But as they are, there must be a conversion figure.

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 4:19pm
Mick F wrote:Samuel D wrote:CO2 is directly proportional to the weight of fuel burned ........... There's much more to it than that perhaps?

Surely, CO2 is a by-product of burning fuel in a particular engine, not directly proportional per litre burned. Differently designed engines will produce less CO2 than others. Yes?
No. It is a matter of very basic chemistry as taught at GSCE. Each atom of carbon in the fuel is converted to CO2 when the engine combusts it. What else do you propose happens to it? Clearly a little bit of uncombusted or partially combusted fuel can sometimes be seen coming out the exhaust pipe, for example as soot, but that is tiny unless the engine is very faulty. And there is a tiny amount of carbon monoxide, 'cos people can poison themselves with exhaust fumes in an enclosed space, but it only takes very tiny amounts to poison you. So it doesn't quite all convert to CO2, but I would say that something like 99.9% is a reasonable estimate of the conversion rate even in a Model T Ford. So basically the CO2 is precisely related to the quantity of fuel consumed.

The kind of fuel makes a difference. CO2 per litre is 5-10% higher for diesel than petrol, depending upon the precise composition of the fuels, but that's because diesel has more energy per litre ("higher energy density") than petrol. In general, diesel vehicles put out less CO2 per km, because diesel engines are inherently more efficient, even after correcting for the higher energy density of the fuel. That's why we British diesel users are content to pay more per litre for the stuff. The increased NOx output of diesel engines is only a problem in areas of high pollution, it's really irrelevant everywhere else. What we really need in our cars is something like that Volkswagen software, but which changes the engine tune according to our location, prioritising pollution when in dense conurbations and the like, and prioritising efficiency everywhere else.

Re: Commuting - best lock for awkward fixing points?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 4:19pm
If all advise on a lock isn't working then your last bet if a bike is really needed is a sacrificial one. Something so pig ugly and cheap but roadworthy that any thief wouldn't want it anyway. A bso if need be. Even they can be made roadworthy with a bit of work.

Light, strong and secure locks just don't exist and probably never will.

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 January 2016 - 4:06pm
irc wrote:JaccoW wrote:How about a Specialized Awol expert frame?

Have you priced them? £700!!! Getting into custom build territory.

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... t-ec128708

Another vote for the Disc Trucker here. Cheap for a frameset. And the Truckers are great do it all bikes.
Sorry, didn't know they were much more expensive in the UK. You can buy them in mainland Europe for €599... which is £455. That is very similar in price or even cheaper than the Surly Disc Trucker.
And you can put pretty much any gearing on it. Derailleur, Rohloff and even belt drive.

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 3:57pm
The main problem with fuel efficiency is aerodynamics. If you have a nice slippery car with a low drag coefficient, and an economical engine, you're quids in.

Drag coefficient of a Fiat 500 isn't good. 0.33cd I think.
This is because of its cutesy looks. Look is everything to the markets.

I bought the 500 for it's looks and the very interesting 2cyl engine - and the fact that it's zero VED - not for its outright economy.
Mind you, it's classed as a "city car" and in that environment, it's very good indeed.

Re: Commuting - best lock for awkward fixing points?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 3:33pm
There's a lot recommending beefy lock for leaving at work then lesser lock elsewhere. That doesn't work for me since work is not the highest risk area I tend to get leave my bike. This means the lock to be carried should be the better one. If that's the case there's very little benefit to leaving a second lock at work IMHO. I'd prefer to save money and get a compromise lock. I'm guessing silver rated might be good enough for medium/low risk areas.

I need to sort a new lock out soon since my cable lock has a twisted key that may fail soon. The D lock has only one key now. I don't trust a lock with one key. You never know when you'll lose it or it fails. I like backups.

At work I feel like I'm paranoid for wanting to use a good lock. Everyone else uses a thin cable lock. Some don't lock their bike up. Some just take it into the warehouse which is always left open and often has nobody in there. After the bikes got nicked last year rather brazenly in front of observers I have no faith in the idea of putting a bike out of sight. The likely toerags around work have no problem with just walking into fenced properties and even into open buildings. If caught they'll likely give a lot of chat back then just leave. Trouble is lots at work will know the bike thieves personally. They're not involved with them but come from the same area. If it was their bike they'd get it back with a few phone calls and a visit to someone. Communities sometimes know how to sort their own out if you follow me.

BTW I'm paranoid about getting a bike nicked again but the locking option needs to be easy and quick to use. I'm often getting to work just in time to start work on time. Anything taking time to get the bike just right to squeeze it into the tight D lock won't work.

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 3:31pm
beardy wrote:
Probably a reflection on driving styles. How you feel about using the brakes and throttle, how long your journeys are and the type of terrain you drive on. If I was to take the lanes instead of the A and B roads my mpg would plummet, a big heavy diesel likes to cruise on straightish, flat roads with no interruptions.

No motorways or dual carriageways around here, plenty of hills and narrow lanes although not as hilly as Devon and Cornwall. The Mitsu will do 45 mpg all the time as long as you stay under 75, if you floor it and average higher than 75 it returns about 38mpg. It has quite an advanced engine with variable valve timing and very low emissions. In four years I have only done 18000 miles so I will be keeping it for a while. I am surprised tbe Fiat mpg varies so much, plenty of very short journeys up and down steep hills on the choke to the pub I guess?

Fitted a new battery to my wifes car this morning, what a struggle! Modern motor mechanics need to be contortionists with mega toolkits.

Al

Re: Commuting - best lock for awkward fixing points?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 3:22pm
Whatever you buy, you will find it is always half-an-inch too narrow to go around a street sign, or half-an-inch too short to get your wheel, frame, and solid object included! After ten minutes grunting and cursing your hands will be covered in oil and knuckles skinned.

What's worked for me (over twenty years since having a bike pinched *touches wood*) is an Abus Gold U-lock; I always make sure I fill it fully with wheel, frame and solid object being locked to because, although angle-grinders will go through anything, the most common attack on U-locks is £19.99 motorists' hydraulic bottle-jack (carried in a small bag) inserted into the lock and pumped up.

If locking for any short time, even to pick up a pint of milk, I will secure wheel, frame and fixed object. If leaving for any length of time, like a meeting, I'll do that plus put a cable around the other wheel (despite security pins). Or I'll use an Abus flexi lock on the other wheel. It's good to use two different types. The U-lock can be attacked with a bottle jack but a flexi lock can't be. The flexi can be snipped with a bold-croppers but the U-lock can't be - not easily anyway, you need a 42" croppers.

It's a long time since I've left a bike all day outside the office; I don't know if I would now, but the last time I did so, I left a mother of a chain permanently locked outside my employer's office.

If they come after your bike with a petrol driven angle-grinder, it is gone. No question. Nothing will hold up against that. I'm working on a building site at the moment and they use them to cut through reinforced concrete steelwork like going through butter.

The big problem in central London now is there simply aren't enough Sheffield Stands to go around. There are no longer any parking meters, and all buildings have "bicycles will be removed" signs (and they will, I've tested this). To combat this problem I now use my Brompton for most central London utility rides. It comes with me, into the shops, into the meetings. When it is in my hand, I know it isn't being robbed.

Re: Calais

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 January 2016 - 3:17pm
It sounds like Calais isn't too bad then. I guess there's a free campsite nearby

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 3:03pm
Yes. Very very true indeed.

Try driving round here.
If I reset the trip meter (engine warm!) at home and drive up the road to the next village a couple of miles away, I'll have done 15mpg.
Reset, then turn round and come back, and the mpg figure is off the scale at 99.9mpg but the brakes are on most of the way.

Try cycling round here!
Either in bottom gear struggling, puffing and panting up the hills ............ or 40mph flying back down.

It all takes its toll. Fuel, brakes, tyres. Get on a motorway and take your time, and there's hardly any effort.

70mph in the 500 will get 60mpg if you don't keep slowing and flooring it getting through busy motorway traffic. The car is good for 100mph+.
The Clio OTOH, will do about 40mpg at 70mph, but if I slow to 65mph or slightly less, I can get 50mpg out of it. Take it over the limit, and the fuel consumption plummets. By all accounts, it'll do 120mph.

Re: Snow bikes race through the Alps

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 2:34pm
snow_bike2.jpgWho needs fat tyres? This is a common sight in Zermatt, which is car-free (kind-of).

Re: Downside to cheaper petrol.

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 29 January 2016 - 2:33pm
al_yrpal wrote:Mick F wrote:Yes, the Fiat500 is a Twinair 2cyl 85bhp and goes like a rocket. The CO2 is 99gms per Km, and that puts it into the zero VED category. We can get 60mpg out of it on a run on the motorway, but locally it returns just less than 40mpg.

The 1.6 16v Clio OTOH has 170gms per Km. It can give 55mpg on a motorway, but locally it's more like 35mpg ........... ie not a lot different economy to the Fiat500. It's the CO2 that's the difference.

Blimey! I had noticed that those Fiats streak along but those figures make it less economical than my Mitsu ASX Cat 5 diesel 1.8 4wd. I have never got 60 mpg. More like 45 mpg whatever.

Al

Probably a reflection on driving styles. How you feel about using the brakes and throttle, how long your journeys are and the type of terrain you drive on. If I was to take the lanes instead of the A and B roads my mpg would plummet, a big heavy diesel likes to cruise on straightish, flat roads with no interruptions.

Re: America: the bizarre

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 January 2016 - 12:39pm
Vorpal wrote:This is a whole nother thread, but yes, sign posting in the UK is really poor. And it's not because they get nicked.
I think there are 2 separate issues. One is poor signposting and the other signs (whether poor or otherwise) that are no longer there. Off the top of my head I can think of half a dozen places within 2 or 3 miles of home at significant junctions where there are now empty poles where there used to be signs.

I don't know if they were stolen in this instance but I can't think of any other reason why they would simply be removed and not replaced. A search on the BBC news website for "stolen road signs" throws up a number of reported instances in different parts of the country over recent years, involving thousands of pounds worth of signs in each instance. Along with theft electricity, railway signalling & telecommunication cables it seems to be an ongoing problem, even if it has been reduced somewhat in the last year by more strict regulation of scrap metal dealers.

Rick.
Syndicate content
 
  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: sco42541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.

Copyright © CTC 2016

Terms and Conditions