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Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 10:01am
I ran into the back of parked car on my moped. I was 17 and posing outside the local girls school, far too busy studying the attractions as they left to notice.
Rode it back home too - although the front wheel was nearly touching the engine and the handling was not the best...

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:48am
bikes4two wrote:... my next step is to strap my multi-meter to the handlebars and make further observations.
Why don't you do something like that !!, from 0 to 100 km/h in a while !!!

Re: Backup drivetrain bits

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:41am
Des49 wrote:You touch on a good point here, it's not the parts but often the tools that take up the weight and space. How many people tour with a chain whip, cassette lock ring tool and large spanner on fit on that tool? Or that bottom bracket fixed cup removal tool? I guess not many.

For cassette removal these is a wee gadget called a Hypercracker or NBT2 which Spa cycles stock. It locks into the frame and does the job of a chain whip and removal tool. It fits into a matchbox.
http://www.ctc.org.uk/cycle/hypercrackers

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:38am
bikes4two wrote:... had you fiddle with the calibration/setting somehow?
... fiddling with the calibration/setting??? ...absolutely NO !!! I just connected the dynamo to a small recycled transformer connected the opposite way (i.e. as step-up), all that in the attempt to prepare a sort of "high voltage-keep clear-ready to use" stick to be used, just in case, against bothering individuals such as stray dogs or potential robbers !!! It seems to work !!!



Re: Belguim WW1 and further

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:29am
I've toured a few of the WW1 areas, very moving. Ypres, Somme, Verdun, etc.

What I would recommend is that you read up on the area you are going to. Try to get some decent books from the library. You will read of intense battles that lasted weeks or longer over say a wood, or hill. When you get there you find the wood is no bigger than a football pitch and the high ground barely discernible as a rise.

Don't miss the last post at Ypres.

Enjoy.

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 9:11am
661-Pete wrote:May I take this opportunity to confess that I have run into the back of a parked car.

I think it was when I was in my teens. I wasn't looking where I was going.

In nearly 60 years of cycling, that's not too bad a record!
I think that I have confessed similar before on this forum. I'm not sure how old I was. Maybe 11? I was big enough to be on my first 10 speed with drop handlebars. I was riding along and chatting with a friend, and my only warning was a sort of squeak my friend made just before the moment of impact.

Re: Belguim WW1 and further

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:09am
It's a great trip - we rode Calais - Ypres - Calais in 2012 taking in the Peace Route cycle path around Ypres, 6 nights. So good that we're doing it again this summer ... Calais - Roubaix - Ypres - Ghent - Bruges - Dunkirk - Calais 10 nights.

If you want to PM with an email addy I can send you the story of our 2012 ride and list of various resources.

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 8:38am
There was a famous, but possibly-apocryphal, story of a rider on one of the old courses on the A1. He arrived late, parked in the slip road nipped round the corner to the start further down the side road, raced away from the time-keeper, took the corner head down and went straight up the back of his own bumper

So many things wrong with that.

Re: Get your bike back on the road advice...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 8:07am
Pump up tyres with Halfords branded air?

Re: Get your bike back on the road advice...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 6:53am
Ensure brakes work
Ensure gears work....

Re: Anyone know what this Italian sign means

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 1:43am
nirakaro wrote:Looks like a nice route - is that the col du Mont Cenis?
If it was me, I might take a more westerly (maybe flatter?) line, through Lyon and Grenoble, steady climb to sleep at Le Bourg d’Oisans at 700m, then over the col du Lautaret (~2000m), and down into Briancon (~1300m). Next day the col de l’Echelle is only a 500m climb, nice quiet road, and then it's downhill practically to Turin.
Or you could go into Switzerland, long gentle climb up the Rhone to Brig (700m), then it’s a 1300m climb over the Simplon. And there’s a train through the tunnel if you chicken out
First time I did it, I was 58, reasonably fit but no athlete, and actually hadn’t sat on a bike for four years. As long as you take your time (and you’ve got low enough gears), by the time you’ve ridden across France, the Alps are just not a problem. Really.

Thanks a bunch. I'll check out your route.

Re: Anyone know what this Italian sign means

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 12:49am
Looks like a nice route - is that the col du Mont Cenis?
If it was me, I might take a more westerly (maybe flatter?) line, through Lyon and Grenoble, steady climb to sleep at Le Bourg d’Oisans at 700m, then over the col du Lautaret (~2000m), and down into Briancon (~1300m). Next day the col de l’Echelle is only a 500m climb, nice quiet road, and then it's downhill practically to Turin.
Or you could go into Switzerland, long gentle climb up the Rhone to Brig (700m), then it’s a 1300m climb over the Simplon. And there’s a train through the tunnel if you chicken out
First time I did it, I was 58, reasonably fit but no athlete, and actually hadn’t sat on a bike for four years. As long as you take your time (and you’ve got low enough gears), by the time you’ve ridden across France, the Alps are just not a problem. Really.

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 12:16am
Hope he doesn't drive like that, could do some damage.

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 12:07am
Dave855 wrote:
With regards to home made converters.....is it really worth it and are they as effective as those you can buy? Bikes4two, if I've understood correctly, your test results show that you need to be travelling about 13mph to gain the same power as a standard wall USB charger....that's a bit too fast a speed for me. The chargers mentioned above achieve this at about 9mph.

Hi Dave, well, I looked into the cost of the bits and pieces (I have nothing of that sort laying around in my hobby box) plus the element of trial and error in coming up with something robust and weather-proof, and opted for a purchased product.

In terms of 13MPH to get the same power transfer as the wall charger: the same power may have been obtainable at a lower speed, its just that the 2-speed electric drill I was using, an old drill with no continuously variable speed control, was either spinning the wheel at 5.5 MPH or 13.5 MPH with nothing in between.

My next step is to strap my multi-meter to the handlebars and make further observations.

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 12:00am
ConRAD wrote:... happily up to 224VAC at 28km/h (... with just a minor trick ), look HERE !!!

Ha Ha - I like it - a fellow fettler for sure.

I tried to follow the test leads coming up from the dynohub to see what you'd done, but without success. The Fluke is obviously auto-ranging - had you fiddle with the calibration/setting somehow?

Re: Smartphone as GPS-two major problems

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 February 2016 - 11:49pm
Thanks for all of your responses - some comments on them:
1. Several folks mentioned rain covers and the like - I bought the Doogee DG700 because it is IP67 rated (dust and waterproof to most things likely encountered on bike handlebars) so I'd not likely gain much from such things apart from maybe the screen not doing its own thing when wet?

2. I tried Al's clingfilm dodge (which was mainly to do with keeping the phone dry) - for my phone it didn't aleviate the problem, not even a little bit. Maybe this is down to individual screen sensitivity? Has anyone else found that clingfilm prevents screen madness in the rain? As the most critical time of use is when I'm touring and I tour with a bar bag, the option to tuck the phone inside the map case remains one alternative if all else fails.
P - hi Al - just seen your latest posting on your clingfilm experiment - obviously an issue for you too

3. I think that wet capacitive touch screens are going to be the downside of using smartphones as GPS. As someone pointed out, LocusMap does have a screen lock option, but after experimenting with this in the kitchen just now, the presence of water on the screen in the 'screen locked' mode does give some improvement but notifications in the notifications bar do seem to still be 'active' and thus subject to erroneous selection by water droplets (so I'll look to NOT have any notifications present, i.e. WiFi off and airplane mode).

4. Someone mentioned the fitting of a wrist strap - a good idea - I've got a spare one from my Garmin but at the moment there are no fixing/threading points on the phone so I'll be finding the best place to put some very smal holes in the DG700 casing!

And my thoughts on data loss - one or some of the following are options
> Everything of importance duplicated on a spare SD card (already mentioned above)
> Key files copied to 'the cloud' (e.g. Google Drive) for downloading when on WiFi
> And of course the GPS device is in this case a smartphone, but my 'everyday' smartphone is a separte item which will be tucked safely away in a bag, will have everything duplicated on it 'just in case'.
> And paper maps and other info too of course, albeit 'car atlas' pages.
> In terms of Locus Maps, it might be prudent to only 'load up' those tracks and maps being used at the time and keep the other tracks and maps in separate folders on the SD card. I say this as it seems that the 'phone crash' only corrupted those map/track items running in Locus Map at the time of impact (if I'm making myself clear - a bit like the file corruption that can happen if you pull out the USB pendrive on your PC whilst the files are being read)

Re: Get your bike back on the road advice...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 21 February 2016 - 11:36pm
Hi,
Clean the bike.........sometimes
Lube chain..............gear oil
Replace chain........from ex Halfords skip bike........one previous owner ............whirrrrrrr

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 February 2016 - 11:30pm
Thanks for your thoughts- I have trawled through all the old threads with similar content but I'm struggling to find a straight answer to this question....

Can the E Werk be utilised to harvest more power from a dynamo hub than other USB based chargers such as the Sinewave Revolution/Reactor, specifically when charging a cache battery? Put simply....if cycling say 50 miles at an average speed of 10mph, will the E Werk be able to put more charge into a cache battery than a Sinewave Revolution?

Appreciate the recommendation of the Portapow battery-it's top of the list so far.

With regards to home made converters.....is it really worth it and are they as effective as those you can buy? Bikes4two, if I've understood correctly, your test results show that you need to be travelling about 13mph to gain the same power as a standard wall USB charger....that's a bit too fast a speed for me. The chargers mentioned above achieve this at about 9mph.

Re: WESTERN ISLES

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 February 2016 - 11:20pm
I did it last may/june.....the coldest, grimmest, wettest, wind-permanently-in-your-facest, week of my life.....soaking bodies in sleeping bags and tent that never dried out all week....I wouldn't have missed it for the world. It really is cycling country

Re: Glasgow to Oban

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 February 2016 - 11:04pm
I did a similar route to Mick, but got the ferry from Wemyss Bay to Rothesay. Cycled up Bute then the short ferry crossing over to Colintraive on the mainland. After that, a lovely cycle to Portavadie and another ferry to Tarbert on Kintyre.....quality cycling!! We camped at lochgilphead,and pedalled to Kilmartin via the Crinan canal path which was very pleasant indeed.
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