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Re: Chain replacement before a trip?

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 11:53am
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
viewtopic.php?f=16&t=103770

Very useful thread about parts to take - I would err towards taking the minimum spares, but because of this I am looking towards more prevention than cure!

From Pogies to woolly knickers, tips for staying snug when c

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 11:45am
A few years ago, when I took up cycling, I braved the winter weather a couple of times and got so cold, my snot froze. But as time went on, I learnt how to dress for the conditions and found that my weakest spots were my hands and feet.

http://www.farawayvisions.com/how-to-stay-warm-when-cycling/

Re: Chain replacement before a trip?

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 11:42am
If in doubt I would change it, and try it out to make sure it works with your part worn cassette / chain rings. Pack a rivet extractor and spare joining links and you should be fine.

Re: Chain replacement before a trip?

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 11:34am
Hi,
You will almost certainly pick up a spare chain on route in Europe.
I would take a spare chain and a cheap chain gauge just to compare as you go, then swap chain when you get above 1 %.
A chain will go further but at the expense of cassette and crank chain wheels.
If at 1% stretch if the drive is still quite and are not suffering chain suck (difficult to change gear) you can put the old chain back on after the second (new spare) goes west, then you will have an idea how long they last.
Some here will say you can survive that mileage on one chain but bad weather lack of lube and grit can destroy a cheap chain in a few hundred miles.

Get some one to check your whole drive train before you go.
And practice fitting a chain before you set off.
Prudent for at least one spare chain between you, I would do at the least, don't forget some lube and some gloves, a bit of rag will help, also quick links, and a reliable chain splitter!

Good luck

Re: Anyone know what this Italian sign means

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 10:27am
DaveP wrote:I seem to be having a stupid morning - I see a tunnel entrance, but no sign... ?
+1 thought it was just me

Cycling out of Hook of Holland ferry terminal

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 10:25am
Can anyone tell me how easy or difficult it is to get away from the port and on to the LF1?

I am thinking of cycling across to Nijmegen and then over the border to friends in Heinsberg in Germany. From the maps it looks easier to go North on the LF1 and then pick up the LF4 and go eastwards but stand corrected if there is an easier or more direct route.

Re: Anyone know what this Italian sign means

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:37am
My twopennyworth:

- the Col de l'Échelle to Bardonecchia looks like a very good bet. You could go over the Col de Montgenèvre to Cesana Torinese but I don't know that there's any advantage to that;

- you could take the road that goes via Sestrière and Fenestrelle to Pinerolo. This takes you south of Torino but there's a climb to Sestrière. I don't think this option offers any particular advantages;

- from Susa (more or less) you can follow the Ciclostrada della Val di Susa to Rivoli. I've described the route here;

- I really liked Torino and it's actually quite bike-friendly. But the best route is probably to turn south at either Avigliana or Rivoli (Rivoli would be my choice) and then pick up the cycleway south from Airone and then go cross country from Saluzzo;

- my suggestion for crossing the Apennines would be to pick up the Moncenisio variant of the Ciclovia Francigena (that page is in Italian but there's a map and a gpx download — and you can use Google Translate). I've ridden it from Gavi via Voltaggio and then on down towards the Liguria coast. In theory you can pick it up in Torino on the banks of the Po, however my impression is that this bit was more sketchy than the sections further south;

- you can follow the coast south to Ostiglia on the outskirts of Rome. Personally I would go inland through Toscana and Lazio but that option is definitely more challenging.

Oh and getting back to the original subject, you may well see signs that refer to 'velocipedi' (eg a no entry sign with the words 'eccetto velocipedi') this is this is the term used for cyclists in documents like the Italian equivalent of the Highway Code.

Re: Anyone know what this Italian sign means

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 9:12am
I seem to be having a stupid morning - I see a tunnel entrance, but no sign... ?

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 9:01am
I ran into the back of parked car on my moped. I was 17 and posing outside the local girls school, far too busy studying the attractions as they left to notice.
Rode it back home too - although the front wheel was nearly touching the engine and the handling was not the best...

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 8:48am
bikes4two wrote:... my next step is to strap my multi-meter to the handlebars and make further observations.
Why don't you do something like that !!, from 0 to 100 km/h in a while !!!

Re: Backup drivetrain bits

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 8:41am
Des49 wrote:You touch on a good point here, it's not the parts but often the tools that take up the weight and space. How many people tour with a chain whip, cassette lock ring tool and large spanner on fit on that tool? Or that bottom bracket fixed cup removal tool? I guess not many.

For cassette removal these is a wee gadget called a Hypercracker or NBT2 which Spa cycles stock. It locks into the frame and does the job of a chain whip and removal tool. It fits into a matchbox.
http://www.ctc.org.uk/cycle/hypercrackers

Re: Battery recommendations (dynamo charging)

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 8:38am
bikes4two wrote:... had you fiddle with the calibration/setting somehow?
... fiddling with the calibration/setting??? ...absolutely NO !!! I just connected the dynamo to a small recycled transformer connected the opposite way (i.e. as step-up), all that in the attempt to prepare a sort of "high voltage-keep clear-ready to use" stick to be used, just in case, against bothering individuals such as stray dogs or potential robbers !!! It seems to work !!!



Re: Belguim WW1 and further

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 8:29am
I've toured a few of the WW1 areas, very moving. Ypres, Somme, Verdun, etc.

What I would recommend is that you read up on the area you are going to. Try to get some decent books from the library. You will read of intense battles that lasted weeks or longer over say a wood, or hill. When you get there you find the wood is no bigger than a football pitch and the high ground barely discernible as a rise.

Don't miss the last post at Ypres.

Enjoy.

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 8:11am
661-Pete wrote:May I take this opportunity to confess that I have run into the back of a parked car.

I think it was when I was in my teens. I wasn't looking where I was going.

In nearly 60 years of cycling, that's not too bad a record!
I think that I have confessed similar before on this forum. I'm not sure how old I was. Maybe 11? I was big enough to be on my first 10 speed with drop handlebars. I was riding along and chatting with a friend, and my only warning was a sort of squeak my friend made just before the moment of impact.

Re: Belguim WW1 and further

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 February 2016 - 8:09am
It's a great trip - we rode Calais - Ypres - Calais in 2012 taking in the Peace Route cycle path around Ypres, 6 nights. So good that we're doing it again this summer ... Calais - Roubaix - Ypres - Ghent - Bruges - Dunkirk - Calais 10 nights.

If you want to PM with an email addy I can send you the story of our 2012 ride and list of various resources.

Re: Video - Yet another cyclist a victim

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 7:38am
There was a famous, but possibly-apocryphal, story of a rider on one of the old courses on the A1. He arrived late, parked in the slip road nipped round the corner to the start further down the side road, raced away from the time-keeper, took the corner head down and went straight up the back of his own bumper

So many things wrong with that.

Re: Get your bike back on the road advice...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 7:07am
Pump up tyres with Halfords branded air?

Re: Get your bike back on the road advice...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 22 February 2016 - 5:53am
Ensure brakes work
Ensure gears work....
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