Feed aggregator

Re: First cycle tour

You could be right about the mileage since I'm only used to short commutes and I may try a loaded day ride beforehand.

However, I would rate my fitness as very good and I'm used to walking for 7+ hours carrying 15+kg on multiple days on e.g. coastal paths which can be rather undulating. So I'm sure I'm capable but that doesn't mean I won't find it unexpectedly challenging.

Re: First cycle tour

I don't know how long or fast your commute is, but I really wouldn't underestimate how tough and hilly Devon and South Somerset can be. Going over Exmoor was tougher than anything I've ridden in the Alps.

Unless you are regularly doing day rides of 60 to 70 miles I would cut your target mileage. Or do some day rides to test what you can feasibly manage. Also bear in mind that it's not so much what you can do on day one that counts, but whether you can get up and do it again on day two and day three. Planning your route so that you have some bail-out options would be a good idea.

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 May 2016 - 10:10pm
You are right on two counts, Natural Ankling; someone needs to lose weight (thanks for the reminder) and yes, on closer inspection, it is an optical illusion.

Re: South Downs Way on a touring bike ??

mercalia wrote:The Downs Link at that time was not very well surfaced, I hope it is better now?

Nope.


(OK, I know that the southern part is better now according to Squeaker. Everything else is still hit and miss.)

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 9:33pm
In Dublin at a set of lights one of my colleagues was waiting to cross when a car jumped a red light.

First reaction of the others around her was to hold hands out to stop people stepping off the kerb. Then the stepped forward as one and stopped the car (hands raised) and gave them a mouthful.
The driver then had to wait for everyone to cross before they could continue.

My South African colleague was astounded, particularly that they'd stopped the driver, but I pointed out that by stopping the driver they'd reduced the incentive for anyone else...

Not sure I could do that in the UK - though I do similar with side roads and other crossings.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 9:28pm
It seems Julie Rand on her LEJOG also had a close pass by a cyclist.Descending the road, however, 3 things happen simultaneously which show how quickly things can change from exhilaration to excruciating while you're cycling: first of all a Polish coach overtakes us at tad too close for comfort just before the road bottoms out. Then a roadie skims silently passed my right shoulder as I'm about to move out for the bend. Seconds later a large sheep to my left decides it's time to see if the grass really is greener on the other side of the road.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 9:16pm
Si wrote:Ah, but were the morris men wearing hiviz, and were they morrissing more than 2 abreast? And I'm not even going to ask if they were wearing morris helmets.Good one!

Re: Lyon to Ljubljana across the Alps: route advice

Wow, thanks everyone for a tonne of useful tips, I'll post my own impressions after the ride! Thanks loads!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 8:50pm
Si wrote:Ah, but were the morris men wearing hiviz, and were they morrissing more than 2 abreast? And I'm not even going to ask if they were wearing morris helmets.

I'm with you. I got 'morrised out' at a folk festival a few years back. I can't do the bells or stick clacking without going into a spasm now. THEN at a nearby wassailing I was invited to join a local group recently 'coz I looked like I could'! Whatever that meant.

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

Hmm.......I read it as two separate words, as in saddle is saggy and stem is twisted around. Brookes saddles tend to do that regardless of the riders weight and the bar is actually very curvy which if I hadn't read the story and saw the front facing photo I'd have thought the same.
Some febreeze would make it smell nice too

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

Vantage wrote:NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Some one needs to lose weight or limit the stunts.........................saddle stem / other is bent

The bar is just really curved. It's shown properly on the story page of her link.

I thought saddle stem was another word for seat post. Looking at both bikes right now and I see no bend. Maybe I need Mr Sheen, Vantage?

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Some one needs to lose weight or limit the stunts.........................saddle stem / other is bent

The bar is just really curved. It's shown properly on the story page of her link.

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Some one needs to lose weight or limit the stunts.........................saddle stem / other is bent

Really? Which bike?

Re: Janet Street Porter

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 8:25pm
Bicycler wrote:ANTONISH wrote:IMO pedestrians often get the worse of things- being herded to inconvenient crossings and always having to be aware that the pavement may not always be exclusively used by pedestrians.
Nah, I don't buy that. Pedestrians are also victims of the tyranny of the motocracy but cyclists have it worse. Pedestrians mostly have pavements to their own exclusive use. Cyclists virtually never have their own exclusive space. Cycle tracks have the same kind of rubbish crossings that pedestrians have. I am confident that I could walk any road in the country that I am legally permitted to if I so wished, yet there are a good number I could not cycle on because of the danger. We don't have adults who feel unable to walk across town because of the perceived danger of doing so, yet huge proportions of the population feel unable to make ever simple journeys by cycle because of fear of being injured or killed. Pedestrians may use all of the rights of way network, any newly constructed cycle paths and all public space. Cyclists may use only a small proportion of the rights of way network and shared use cycle facilities are often poorly suited to their needs.

Absolutely spot on!
And it's a disgrace that it continues as it does,with cycling organisations(no names mentioned)folding meekly to the motoring bullies.

Re: Lightweight touring - How much can you pack in the bags?

Hi,
Some one needs to lose weight or limit the stunts.........................saddle stem / other is bent

Re: Has anyone cycled the Camino?

I have been looking at the Camino for 2017. I think the best option for me could be the Portugese route. I think it could be done in a week. I would like to spend a few weeks on the Road, but kids, job etc won't allow it
I haven't done too much research, but it could be possible to get flights into Porto and back from Santiago
Planning for 2017 and we haven't been on our 2016 tour yet!

Re: Sally Shalloe

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 13 May 2016 - 7:34pm
Middleton Boulevard is on the signposted route from the Jubilee to the main campus of Nottingham University. According to the BBC, the judge described this as "an accident waiting to happen". Indeed anyone cycling or walking along this route must cross 11 lanes carrying heavy, fast-moving traffic, albeit assisted with the help of 4 separate pelican crossings. That is 11 lanes too many.

For many years, I have been arguing to Nottingham City Council and to the University of Nottingham that the ambition should be proposed to create a completely traffic-free route connecting the campuses. I have made it clear that I would not expect the ambition to be realised soon, but it should be put forward as part of the university/council masterplan - as an example of such an ambition, I gave the cycling bridge currently being built over the Amsterdam-Rijnkanaal at a cost of 24 million euros, which was first entered in the master-plan for Utrecht council in 1993.

I have in the past never argued for such a traffic-free route on safety grounds and I remain very hesitant about doing so even now. The primary function would be to enhance the pleasure and conviviality of daily travel between the campuses. Developments at the University of Nottingham make the argument for such a route much stronger than when I first put the proposal forward: the Jubilee Campus has now expanded considerably but, more importantly, new student residences on and close to Jubilee mean inter-campus travel now occurs on a massive scale.

As part of the University's expansion, new traffic lights have been installed at the end of Triumph Road to facilitate the movement of cars to and from the campus. I guess that the University will have had to make a financial contribution for this change to the public road system. But I know of no changes that have been made to facilitate the movements of pedestrians and cyclists: the University's answer is to bus students between campuses. (When I started the buses were single-decker; they are now double-decker.) The only response I have ever had to my proposal was from the Head Of Estates who dismissed it as "unrealistic".

I wonder whether I am the only one to thing that it is scandalous to bus students, most of whom are (currently at least) fit and healthy, when the distances are so short. I wonder also why nobody in a position of influence in a UK university is willing to lead the way in setting ambitions for their students' welfare.

Re: First cycle tour

That sort of distance I'd be looking to get the train down to Plymouth (mainline, no changes) then cycling up the Devon coast to coast route to Barnstaple, then following the West Country Way from Barnstaple to Bristol.
Syndicate content
 
  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: SC042541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.

Copyright © CTC 2016

Terms and Conditions