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Re: route ideas - spain to czech republic

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 4:06pm
aThousandTurns wrote:(Do you still hang out at Thorn Tree, Iviehoff? Or is that finished.)
I do, for my sins. But it has never got many people back to replace the majority who left during The Troubles.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 4:02pm
Hi,
[XAP]Bob, your too honest.
Do what I do,
Get a quote from shop.
Show him and then adjust the price to do work yourself, perfectly legal.
If he quibbles, get the shop to do the work and ask for the old parts back.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 3:33pm
The "stoop" comment was regarding 'Don't forget all the mental stress you suffered'.

As yet I don't need a lawyer... I would be happy to pay the fair share of usage on the existing chain/sprockets - they are consumables after all, it just changes the timing of the replacement.

Just had a call to say that he has paid ICE for the parts and shipping (in full, despite me suggesting a compromise as above), but that he had missed the cutoff time for today's post.
Yet to have confirmation from ICE, but that sounds like a good result to me...


You're entitled to claim for loss, damage and expense. It isn't stooping to claim, it's the way the system works.
Loss: 5 minutes of time, I call that natural variance on a journey.
Damage: He's paid in full for all parts required - despite some being worn, and 'indicated' parts, rather than obvious damage.
Expense: It's cost me 3 emails and one SMS.

I suppose I will take some time to fit the shiny parts, but I'm not paying him for that benefit

Re: Tacks on the cycle path in Swansea

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 2:55pm
hamish wrote:Watch out for tacks/drawing pins on the cycle path in Swansea around Blackpill on Route 4

Two of us punctured this morning and other people I know had problems yesterday.

Nobody knows who is doing it and why but it is irritating.

Were you one of the tandemists repairing between Blackpill and the university?

They are at it again. I was nailed (well... pinned) near West Cross yesterday. http://www.southwales-eveningpost.co.uk/Swansea-cycle-path-drawing-pin-menace-widened-net/story-29032901-detail/story.html

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 1:09pm
When I joined the South Lancashire Road Club in the late 1970s, the club time-keeper was reputed to have braized a 13 sprocket to his chain-set to get a lower gear.

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 1:06pm
Sweep wrote:NATURAL ANKLING wrote:But who would really need more than 42 x 11 on a 700 x 35, you wont keep it up long even with no load so the top gears over 100 " are a bit academic, 53 x 11 is for he-men

I have 11-34 and 22-32-42 on a very very well used 8-speed bike - used for load lugging/day rides/around town.

Touring will often be on 37/38 tyres, zapping around town 28mm.

Have you never felt the need for a 44T big ring?

I have been considering it.

This is a handy web-site you can put in your chain-ring and cassette ratios and tyre size and it will tell you the speed for a range of cadences or cadence at speed and other stuff such as gear inches, ratios and development.

http://www.bikecalc.com/speed_at_cadence

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 12:55pm
My setup is on my recumbent trike is ...........
Double-Double in the front:- Twin chainrings 53/38 in a Schlumpf High Speed Drive, 132.5/95 in overdrive.
Rohloff in the rear built into a 20" wheel with a 21 tooth sprocket.
That gives me 24 unique gears with around 14% step-up between each gear, 9.5"-172".
Low normal range is 1.5 mph up to around 14 mph.
High normal spins out at just over 20 mph.
Low overdrive spins out at around 35 mph.
High overdrive has not been spun out yet as I've only got up to 45 mph downhill on this trike so far ........

The reason for the double-double is lifts the speed I hit the overdrive range, when I hit maximum drag with the HSD, without loosing the silly low first gear.
Plus going into overdrive is only a 4 shift down on the Rohloff, not a 7 shift down.

Graeme Obree on Radio 2 at 1pm

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 12:08pm
Graeme Obree is on the Jeremy Vine show at 1pm to talk about his Battle Mountain film -

http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/videos/w ... iler-video

Graeme Obree on Radio 2 at 1pm

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 12:08pm
Graeme Obree is on the Jeremy Vine show at 1pm to talk about his Battle Mountain film -

http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/videos/w ... iler-video

Re: Punctured!

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 11:43am
A bottle of wine fits very nicely into a bottle cage. A toe-strap around the neck of the bottle prevents any disasters when going over speed bumps.
Perhaps you could consider changing your tipple.

On the whole personally I would usually go for tea.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 11:17am
[XAP]Bob wrote:blackbike wrote:You have a duty to sting him for as much as you can so he is more careful in future.

Ring a claims lawyer. Don't forget all the mental stress you suffered.
I refuse to stoop to that level

You're entitled to claim for loss, damage and expense. It isn't stooping to claim, it's the way the system works. In an ideal world the law would give cyclists better protection but right now it's how it is - careless motoring is accepted and compensated for with cash.

A note of caution - you were moving from a minor road into a major road, which could be used by the motorist to put the blame on to you. Its quite common for a motorist to claim for whiplash injuries as well as loss and expense in those circumstances, which can include loss of earnings while their car is being repaired. I wouldn't dare settle it personally with the current motor claims culture.

Re: 2016 ride plans

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 10:28am
Starting in May I am doing Spain/France/Andorra for a month. Then if the weather isn't too bad I'm going to cycle and camp up the west coast of Scotland - Mull, then Barra/Uists/Skye/Ardnamurchan. Then September I am going to do a French end to end starting in Hendaye - Calais and then cycling home. Oh and if I get time, I might try and fit a 10 day LEJOG in there somewhere!

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 10:28am
puffin wrote:Dogs are an important part of our heritage and our national psyche, I am happy to share the roads with them safe in the knowledge of the joy they bring. If it means I have to slow up, that is a very small price to pay.
+1
My dogs are often walked on a shared use path. Many cyclists are a real problem there as they approach silently from behind at speed and passing the pedestrian (with or without dog) far too close for comfort. It seems to be some sort of sport. A reasonable call of 'Slow down' results in a bad tempered look or abuse from the cyclists. The police are aware but can't do anything.
Most dogs are off the lead but then why shouldn't they be? It is, after all, a well known dog walking area. Some dogs are on the retractable type of lead which are almost impossible for the oncoming cyclists to see and avoid. A collision is inevitable and some dogwalkers are now afraid to go there.
Given that cyclists comprise maybe 1% of the path users its incumbent of those cyclists (some who are 'real' cyclists) to respect the majority.

Many people here bang on about motorists driving dangerously and rightly so but can't we extend the same thinking to dogwalkers and pedestrians? If not then all we do is to irritate those people who when they drive may think they can do the same to cyclists. A bit of civility and consideration goes a long way to counter the widely held belief that cyclists are a selfish, arrogant bunch.

So next time you're held up by a dogwalker who may not have seen you approaching just extend them the same amount of curtesy that we want from motorists.

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 10:11am
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:But who would really need more than 42 x 11 on a 700 x 35, you wont keep it up long even with no load so the top gears over 100 " are a bit academic, 53 x 11 is for he-men

I have 11-34 and 22-32-42 on a very very well used 8-speed bike - used for load lugging/day rides/around town.

Touring will often be on 37/38 tyres, zapping around town 28mm.

Have you never felt the need for a 44T big ring?

I have been considering it.

Re: Increasing restrictions on conveying cycles on trains

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 9:43am
andymiller wrote: This one? (I'm assuming).

That's the one. Well placed on the back-lane route from Castle Cary that comes out at the foot of Glastonbury Tor.

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 9:37am
Annoying Twit wrote:Can I ask what gear ratios people are using for their lowest gear for touring, potentially including load pulling such as a single or two wheel trailer?

This webpage recommends a lowest gear of about 20 gear inches, which seems very, very, low from my point of view. https://www.cyclescheme.co.uk/community ... e-up-hills But, then I haven't experience (yet) of extended tours nor load pulling of any sort.

I'd like to hear what people are running, and the opinions of experienced tourers and load-pullers.
16 something gear inches on our Rohloff bikes. This works for us on cycle tours here in Norway towing about 30-35kg of kiddie trailer and 20kg of luggage on the bike. I can manage longer 15% (?) inclines with this setup if on tarmac. The problem is that you eventually hit traction problems especially when trying to start on loose surfaces with a trailer. Chunky tyres help a bit. If I have the trailer behind me then Mrs Syklist will get off her bike and walk behind me pushing the trailer as I make the first down stroke.

18.5 gear inches on our Bromptons (and Dahons when I have built the new wheels). We tend to take less luggage when touring on folders and the bikes themselves are lighter. Although we have not done any touring with folders and the trailer as yet.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 8:43am
Equally don't leave yourself out of pocket.

If a new chain and cassette are required as a consequence of the the accident then an insurance company would have paid without quibble .

Glad you are ok.

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 6:23am
al_yrpal wrote:22t chainwheel, 32t sprocket gives about 18" gear. You can go up anything.

Al
22 front, but 34 back which sheldon's calculator tells me is

17.7 on a 700 x 38 tyre.

Don't think i'll be needing any more or a 36 on the back.

My biggest ring is 42 and i can spin out fairly easily but my rear mech has at least another 2 teeth in it I think so may I may put a 44 big ring on and then for sure I think all will be Hunky Dory.

This is for my 8 speed bike but the 9 speed tourer is effectively the same.

Which confirms to me that tourers have no need at all for more than 9 cogs, whatever the "industry" may try to tell us.

Only fairly recently got my head around the figures - thanks to sheldon for his old school web calculator which offers lots of different outputs:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 12:09am
blackbike wrote:You have a duty to sting him for as much as you can so he is more careful in future.

Ring a claims lawyer. Don't forget all the mental stress you suffered.
I refuse to stoop to that level

Re: Punctured!

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 31 March 2016 - 11:22pm
Better off without it.

Beer and cycling?

Take those electrolyte/caffeine tablet drinks with you just in case you get too dehydrated!
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