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Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 6:46am
Flite wrote:I've seen a tool stand similar to the one in the photo above at YHA National Forest, so they could probably know the supplier

Here's the manufacturer's website:

http://www.bikefixtation.com/products/public-work-stand

These guys look like they might be the UK distributors:

http://www.cyclehoop.com/product/public ... air-stand/

Googling 'public workstand bike' produces quite a few links.

How much they cost, and really whether they are a priority - don't know, depends on the budget I guess. You could save on the cost of a lean-to or shed by attaching an umbrella to one of the cables.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 5:36am
jgurney wrote:alibh wrote: We'll try and get an alcohol licence (my husband likes this idea!).

Getting an alcohol license will be complicated and expensive. It may require alterations to the premises. It would mean a higher level of supervision of guests and potential problems, as once you had a licence it would be illegal to allow any drunken person to enter or remain there (even if they had done their drinking elsewhere). If a guest, having checked in, etc, goes out for a walk, calls at the local pub, and comes back somewhat merry or unsteady, the operator of a non-licensed B&B, hostel, etc, can let then back in at their discretion.The licensee of a licensed one must turn them out, or face prosecution for allowing an intoxicated person to enter licensed premises.

It would also mean that you would be required to prohibit guests from consuming any alcohol other than that bought from you while on the premises. This has proved a problem for the YHA, especially in areas with local specialty drinks which they don't stock (e.g. in some West Country hostels which offer bottles of Magners or Strongbow, some guests have not liked being told they must not drink the much superior cider they bought at the local farmhouse).This makes sense to me and there's another reason for staying away from an alcohol license: it will put you in competition with the local pubs who have enough on making ends meet. It's always good to stay well in with the locals who live there all year. You can get a really good symbiosis going with local pubs: you send them there for a pint and perhaps a meal and they send weary cyclists to you.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 9:42pm
greyingbeard wrote:None.
There are no dedicated cycle paths near where I live.
A few bits of road have bike sybols on the wide bits, which stop at the less-wide bits where they are needed, most of the "bike" bits or road are littered with parked cars. WELL DONE North Herts District Council.
+1.

Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 9:32pm
Not sure if this is the right section to put it in (?) but I like him and I like this little vid of him :

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/ ... are_btn_fb

Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 9:32pm
Not sure if this is the right section to put it in (?) but I like him and I like this little vid of him :

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/ ... are_btn_fb

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 8:30pm
I've seen a tool stand similar to the one in the photo above at YHA National Forest, so they could probably know the supplier

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 8:12pm
khain wrote:kylecycler wrote:Somewhere out in the ether there's a doggy forum where the dogs are complaining about the behaviour of bicycles and their owners on their dog path. :)

If they can show me the sign with a dog on it indicating the path is a dog path I'll happily grant them right of way.
I've never seen a sign including a baby buggy either so many they should be banned from such shared use paths ?

Ian

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:41pm
khain wrote:Dogs are not unpredictable - you might not be able to read their body language, but that's a different problem.
So cyclists are expected to be experts on dogs' body language?

I guess you're right in a way. Statistically at least one in every ten dogs can be predicted to run right across your path so they aren't completely unpredictable.


So motorists are supposed to be experts on cyclists behaviour?

It cuts both ways - if you can't predict it then behave sensibly, slow down so you can stop if needed.


ALL paths where pedestrians are allowed are doggy paths (there are a few specific exceptions somewhere I guess)

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:26pm
kylecycler wrote:Somewhere out in the ether there's a doggy forum where the dogs are complaining about the behaviour of bicycles and their owners on their dog path.

If they can show me the sign with a dog on it indicating the path is a dog path I'll happily grant them right of way.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:21pm
Si wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:khain wrote:I need to slow down or stop for every one.

Yep - that's the correct thing to do.
Just as we expect motorists to slow down for each and every cyclist on the road.

+1

Also, is it more likely that you will see a dog as they go somewhat slower than a cyclist (the dog being encumbered by their servant), thus on my local bit of cycle path it would take me a couple of mins to cross the park, yet a dog might take 15 mins.....so at any specific time the dog is much more likely to be in sight than the cyclist.
That's a very fair point.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:20pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:And I have now had confirmation from ICE - the bill is indeed paid in full.

Glad you got sorted and he paid up,stand up guy,good result

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:16pm
Dogs are not unpredictable - you might not be able to read their body language, but that's a different problem.
So cyclists are expected to be experts on dogs' body language?

I guess you're right in a way. Statistically at least one in every ten dogs can be predicted to run right across your path so they aren't completely unpredictable.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:12pm
climo wrote:puffin wrote:Dogs are an important part of our heritage and our national psyche, I am happy to share the roads with them safe in the knowledge of the joy they bring. If it means I have to slow up, that is a very small price to pay.
+1
My dogs are often walked on a shared use path. Many cyclists are a real problem there as they approach silently from behind at speed and passing the pedestrian (with or without dog) far too close for comfort. It seems to be some sort of sport. A reasonable call of 'Slow down' results in a bad tempered look or abuse from the cyclists. The police are aware but can't do anything.
Most dogs are off the lead but then why shouldn't they be? It is, after all, a well known dog walking area. Some dogs are on the retractable type of lead which are almost impossible for the oncoming cyclists to see and avoid. A collision is inevitable and some dogwalkers are now afraid to go there.
Given that cyclists comprise maybe 1% of the path users its incumbent of those cyclists (some who are 'real' cyclists) to respect the majority.

Many people here bang on about motorists driving dangerously and rightly so but can't we extend the same thinking to dogwalkers and pedestrians? If not then all we do is to irritate those people who when they drive may think they can do the same to cyclists. A bit of civility and consideration goes a long way to counter the widely held belief that cyclists are a selfish, arrogant bunch.

So next time you're held up by a dogwalker who may not have seen you approaching just extend them the same amount of curtesy that we want from motorists.
Part of the problem is that these paths are being promoted to cyclists as cycle paths, rather than shared use paths, so cyclists, not unreasonably, expect to cycle on them. Plus, where the paths are divided pedestrians and dog-walkers seldom respect the divisions.

The main problem is that the UK's cycling infrastructure is a joke. I doubt cyclists in most European countries would put up with cycle paths where pedestrians and dogs outnumber cyclists.

Please read the guidelines for using shared paths. The fact that many dog walkers use them does not mean they have more rights than cyclists or that it's ok for their dogs to be loose. It is a shared path not a dog-walking area. If a lead on a cycle path is invisible then dog owners should use leads that are visible.

http://www.sustrans.org.uk/change-your-travel/get-cycling/advice-using-shared-use-paths
If walking a dog, keep them under control which may require a short lead

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 7:09pm
khain wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:khain wrote:I need to slow down or stop for every one.

Yep - that's the correct thing to do.
Just as we expect motorists to slow down for each and every cyclist on the road.
I'm happy to know you equate cyclists with dogs.

Why would you expect all motorists to slow down or stop for every cyclist? If the road is clear I'm perfectly happy for a car to overtake without slowing down, so long as it gives me plenty of space.

The difference is that dogs are unpredictable and very often stray into your path without warning so you must slow down. Also, they have a tendency to chase bikes. I've been chased myself and have seen a few accidents caused by dogs chasing bikes on cycle paths.

Can you imagine the uproar if dogs were all over the roads? And yet cyclists are supposed to use roads rather than pavements.

Dogs are not unpredictable - you might not be able to read their body language, but that's a different problem.

If there is sufficient space then you can overtake a dog at some speed - also I've never had a dog *on a walk* chase me at all... No matter what form of transport I was using. I can't recall ever seeing a dog on a walk chase anyone either - I have seen plenty chase other dogs, or squirrels, or.... but never a person.

But basically yes - any time in a car and passing a cyclist I expect to slow down to do so. The exception is when I am on road with two lanes in each direction AND the speed limit is relatively low (30-50 depending on the width of the lanes).



Road users have a duty of care to all road users more vulnerable than themselves...

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 6:34pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:khain wrote:I need to slow down or stop for every one.

Yep - that's the correct thing to do.
Just as we expect motorists to slow down for each and every cyclist on the road.
I'm happy to know you equate cyclists with dogs.

Why would you expect all motorists to slow down or stop for every cyclist? If the road is clear I'm perfectly happy for a car to overtake without slowing down, so long as it gives me plenty of space.

The difference is that dogs are unpredictable and very often stray into your path without warning so you must slow down. Also, they have a tendency to chase bikes. I've been chased myself and have seen a few accidents caused by dogs chasing bikes on cycle paths.

Can you imagine the uproar if dogs were all over the roads? And yet cyclists are supposed to use roads rather than pavements.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 6:21pm
See this is how it's done, nobody injured, person pays for damage they caused with minimal fuss. Stuff happens and yes it could have been worse but wasn't.
I'm still waiting on police after women turned into cul de sac and hit my car. Wasn't a big smash, scrape on bumper, light cluster broken £80 parts and labour. Instead of fessing up she tries to drive off but neighbour saw her and I confronted her but she drives away refusing to vive details.
She now has THREE criminal offences hanging over her and all the crud that goes with it...for the sake oc £80!

Technical officer

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 4:52pm
I just noticed that the CTC (or whatever the organisation is called these days) is advertising various jobs it has on offer. Not one is for a technical officer. It's not hard to see that this organisation has done a full turnaround from which there is no recovery. Years of service to the cycle touring community have been discarded and replaced with a political organisation that wants to save the world from God knows what. What a waste. What a shame. What sacrilege.

Bob Zeller

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 3:45pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:And I have now had confirmation from ICE - the bill is indeed paid in full.


Excellent.
Good result.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 3:17pm
And I have now had confirmation from ICE - the bill is indeed paid in full.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 3:10pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:blackbike wrote:You have a duty to sting him for as much as you can so he is more careful in future.

Ring a claims lawyer. Don't forget all the mental stress you suffered.
I refuse to stoop to that level

Well said Bob.
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