Feed aggregator

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 4:27pm
Vorpal wrote:TBH, I think the fixed tool stand thing is probably an unnecessary expense. Lots of cyclists, even people who work on their own bikes don't bother with a proper tool stand. And if the OP wants to provide some tools and a place for cyclists to repair bikes, there are plenty of less expnsive options. Public toolstands have to be built to resist weather, tampering, and theft. The extent to which things provided by a rural bunkhouse have to do that, is entirely up to the owners, but a suggested tool / spare parts list might be of more value than information about public tool stands.
You could well be right Vorpal However that bike stand does do a couple of things:

a) it tries to keep the bike repair in one place hopefully away from the clean stuff. IME A favourite grouse of motel owners is tourists who work on their bikes in their rooms. I'd also suggest a notice "If you need to oil your chain please do it at the bike stand". The nicest people can be staggeringly inconsiderate with this kind of thing. I've even had a motel manager ask "Please don't use the towels to clean your bike". Yes, she confirmed, people do that.

b) the ugly tool-on-cables arrangement means that no one forgets to return anything and encourages (a)

c) a stand is really nice. I did without one for decades. When I finally got one it was like scales were cast from my eyes. The OP is trying to attract people remember.

Re: Would you rather..

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 4:03pm
mattsccm wrote:Rain. It can be miserable and changes the day.
Wind doesn't do anything until it actually blows you off. It just tilts the road somewhat.Wind is a hill that never seems to end. Even crosswinds are a pain; there's a sailor's saying "the apparent wind is always ahead of the beam" i.e. if the wind is as fast as you are you are always riding into it unless it's actually behind you (roughly speaking). I know whereof I speak, riding W across Kansas into the prevailing SW wind is uphill all the way even though the elevation gain in only 5000 ft in 800 miles.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 1:10pm
I'm just grateful I hadn't put the Schlumpf drive on the trike...

That would have been more expensive than most people realise.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 12:40pm
Tom Richardson wrote:Tonyf33 wrote:minimal fuss.


They haven't been bombarded with 'regarding your recent accident - claim £3000' text messages yet.
And won't be if the insurers/third parties aren't involved.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 10:52am
Thanks for the link. Yes a good little vid'.
When I was a lad the only name I knew in cycling was Reg Harris and I think Chris Boardman comes in this category as being known by the general public. Of course we now have the likes of Wiggins and Hoy who would possibly top that list.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 10:52am
Thanks for the link. Yes a good little vid'.
When I was a lad the only name I knew in cycling was Reg Harris and I think Chris Boardman comes in this category as being known by the general public. Of course we now have the likes of Wiggins and Hoy who would possibly top that list.

Re: Would you rather..

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 10:34am
Rain. It can be miserable and changes the day.
Wind doesn't do anything until it actually blows you off. It just tilts the road somewhat.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 10:00am
sjs wrote:greyingbeard wrote:None.
There are no dedicated cycle paths near where I live.
A few bits of road have bike sybols on the wide bits, which stop at the less-wide bits where they are needed, most of the "bike" bits or road are littered with parked cars. WELL DONE North Herts District Council.
+1.I don't live in the area, but shouldn't that be Hertfordshire County Council? County Councils are normally responsible for Highways not District Councils.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 9:43am
Tonyf33 wrote:minimal fuss.


They haven't been bombarded with 'regarding your recent accident - claim £3000' text messages yet.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 9:10am
TBH, I think the fixed toolstand thing is probably an unnessary expense. Lots of cyclists, even people who work on their own bikes don't bother with a proper tool stand. And if the OP wants to provide some tools and a place for cyclists to repair bikes, there are plenty of less expnsive options. Public toolstands have to be built to resist weather, tampering, and theft. The extent to which things provided by a rural bunkhouse have to do that, is entirely up to the owners, but a suggested tool / spare parts list might be of more value than information about public tool stands.

So, here's my attempt:
Tools
*Hex keys: 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8mm
*T25 torx
*Philips screwdrivers
*Flat screwdriver
*Box wrench 8, 9 and 10mm
*Spoke wrench 3.2, 3.3 and 3.5
*these items can potentially be included in a multitool
Tire levers (have some separate ones to hand, even if they are part of a multitool)
chain tool
chain grip
patch kit
pump(s) for presta and schrader valves
Spares
inner tubes in a few different sizes
screws and nuts
cable ties
tyre boot material

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 7:46am
Flite wrote:I've seen a tool stand similar to the one in the photo above at YHA National Forest, so they could probably know the supplier

Here's the manufacturer's website:

http://www.bikefixtation.com/products/public-work-stand

These guys look like they might be the UK distributors:

http://www.cyclehoop.com/product/public ... air-stand/

Googling 'public workstand bike' produces quite a few links.

How much they cost, and really whether they are a priority - don't know, depends on the budget I guess. You could save on the cost of a lean-to or shed by attaching an umbrella to one of the cables.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 6:36am
jgurney wrote:alibh wrote: We'll try and get an alcohol licence (my husband likes this idea!).

Getting an alcohol license will be complicated and expensive. It may require alterations to the premises. It would mean a higher level of supervision of guests and potential problems, as once you had a licence it would be illegal to allow any drunken person to enter or remain there (even if they had done their drinking elsewhere). If a guest, having checked in, etc, goes out for a walk, calls at the local pub, and comes back somewhat merry or unsteady, the operator of a non-licensed B&B, hostel, etc, can let then back in at their discretion.The licensee of a licensed one must turn them out, or face prosecution for allowing an intoxicated person to enter licensed premises.

It would also mean that you would be required to prohibit guests from consuming any alcohol other than that bought from you while on the premises. This has proved a problem for the YHA, especially in areas with local specialty drinks which they don't stock (e.g. in some West Country hostels which offer bottles of Magners or Strongbow, some guests have not liked being told they must not drink the much superior cider they bought at the local farmhouse).This makes sense to me and there's another reason for staying away from an alcohol license: it will put you in competition with the local pubs who have enough on making ends meet. It's always good to stay well in with the locals who live there all year. You can get a really good symbiosis going with local pubs: you send them there for a pint and perhaps a meal and they send weary cyclists to you.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 10:42pm
greyingbeard wrote:None.
There are no dedicated cycle paths near where I live.
A few bits of road have bike sybols on the wide bits, which stop at the less-wide bits where they are needed, most of the "bike" bits or road are littered with parked cars. WELL DONE North Herts District Council.
+1.

Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 10:32pm
Not sure if this is the right section to put it in (?) but I like him and I like this little vid of him :

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/ ... are_btn_fb

Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 1 April 2016 - 10:32pm
Not sure if this is the right section to put it in (?) but I like him and I like this little vid of him :

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/video/ ... are_btn_fb

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2016 - 9:30pm
I've seen a tool stand similar to the one in the photo above at YHA National Forest, so they could probably know the supplier

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 9:12pm
khain wrote:kylecycler wrote:Somewhere out in the ether there's a doggy forum where the dogs are complaining about the behaviour of bicycles and their owners on their dog path. :)

If they can show me the sign with a dog on it indicating the path is a dog path I'll happily grant them right of way.
I've never seen a sign including a baby buggy either so many they should be banned from such shared use paths ?

Ian

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 8:41pm
khain wrote:Dogs are not unpredictable - you might not be able to read their body language, but that's a different problem.
So cyclists are expected to be experts on dogs' body language?

I guess you're right in a way. Statistically at least one in every ten dogs can be predicted to run right across your path so they aren't completely unpredictable.


So motorists are supposed to be experts on cyclists behaviour?

It cuts both ways - if you can't predict it then behave sensibly, slow down so you can stop if needed.


ALL paths where pedestrians are allowed are doggy paths (there are a few specific exceptions somewhere I guess)

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 8:26pm
kylecycler wrote:Somewhere out in the ether there's a doggy forum where the dogs are complaining about the behaviour of bicycles and their owners on their dog path.

If they can show me the sign with a dog on it indicating the path is a dog path I'll happily grant them right of way.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 1 April 2016 - 8:21pm
Si wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:khain wrote:I need to slow down or stop for every one.

Yep - that's the correct thing to do.
Just as we expect motorists to slow down for each and every cyclist on the road.

+1

Also, is it more likely that you will see a dog as they go somewhat slower than a cyclist (the dog being encumbered by their servant), thus on my local bit of cycle path it would take me a couple of mins to cross the park, yet a dog might take 15 mins.....so at any specific time the dog is much more likely to be in sight than the cyclist.
That's a very fair point.
Syndicate content
 
  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: sco42541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.

Copyright © CTC 2016

Terms and Conditions