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Re: 6 months in Western Europe - complete beginner

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 7:40pm
Thank you everyone for your latest replys.

I got another question, it probably will sound silly to all of you but....

I got most of stuff, I've used bike for last 5 days everyday. Today i was riding and Gps took me on some trial, muddy and basically not quite cycable path. Then it startet raining so i had great opportunity to see what else i need to be ready. Anyways..

question is, once i am on my trip, how do i maintain bike everyday? I came back and bike is muddy, chain etc. Someone said to me that all i need to do is to make sure bike is:

- not soaking wet while raining and not riding
- i shoud have a brush to be able remove dirt, sand and mud if necessary
- apart from that bike no need any other maintanence apart from obvious things like adjustments and replacements and repairs

I bought Cinelli Hobo bootleg if it make any difference...

Thank you everyone in advance... Youre my only source of knowlege at the moment :D

Thanks

Re: Does this annoy anyone or just me?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 7:38pm
Well today I saw yet another example of declining standards. On the loop I did I was travelling along a narrow backroad. The road drops down a short but steep incline into a 90 degree left hand bend. This is totally blind due to the natural environment, tree's and hedges. I was doing around 20mph but braking as I approached the bend, it's blind and the road is disintegrating. I could hear a large car behind me and thought they'll wait it's too dangerous to overtake into a single track blind corner with no visibility. Errr no they went for it....... a police BMW X3 . I despair!

Then on return leg I was passed by a Volvo estate whilst crossing a medium sized roundabout. The car had effectively used the right hand turn lane to do the overtake on me and cut ahead. The back window was down with a 3 or 4yr old child hanging out shouting "get on the cycle path" . Start them young so they can carry on the shout as adult car drivers. So I did go off and use it........ to bypass the queue of cars( including said child ) at the temporary traffic lights. Normally I avoid it as it's a shared walkers, runners, dog owner path and I prefer being on roads for most of my time, it's more efficient in general and we're all going in the same direction.

Re: Critiques of routes for touring

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 7:31pm
Commenting only on the bit I know, from Stratford to Gloucester:

From Wellesbourne south as far as Honeybourne it looks pretty good to me, but from there I would probably not go through Evesham unless you have a particular reason to. Nothing particularly wrong with the route, I just wasn't greatly impressed by the town when I've been there! Instead I'd head further south through Wickhamford and Childswickham before cutting west through Hinton on the Green. However, going via Evesham is probably going to be a bit flatter.

From Tewkesbury to Gloucester your route is ok as far as the airport. From there into Gloucester is a bit urban-ish but still ok. However, I'd take a route on the other side of the Severn, crossing on the A438 then heading south through Forthampton, Chaceley, Ashleworth (the tythe barn and quay, with pub, are worth taking a look at), and Maisemore. From the end of Maisemore pick up the the cycle path on the other side of the road immediately after the bridge and follow it via Alney Island (Britain's largest intra-riverine island, it's claimed) into the city. This is hilly at its southern end but the lanes are quite, in good condition and the views in all directions are just beautiful. You can see the Malverns, the Black Mountains and across the Severn plain to the Cotswolds. The view from the hill between Hartpury and Maisemore, on a good day, is one of my favourite things in all the world. And when you're in Gloucester, why not visit Peppers Cafe on Bull Lane, just off Westgate, near the cathedral? Not only is the food good and not too pricey, but it's run by a cyclist; a former RAAM entrant, no less!

Re: Critiques of routes for touring

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 7:13pm
I did the Oxford --> Leicester ride today. Unfortunately, I went off-course several times. Ending up in Bletchingdon (! - way off course, meaning I must have been on the whole wrong canal) at one point. That wasn't so bad, as helpful people even drew me a very good map which helped a lot. Other errors were more serious. E.g. ending up riding several miles on the A5 when I should have just done a short dogleg on that road. No harm done, but I wasn't happy about that. Other errors were comical. Google maps: A raised bit of earth in a farmer's field is not a road!

I spent longer on the Rivers and Canals north of Oxford (and in Oxford) than I planned. This meant that I got a very slow start. The towpaths typically weren't paved, or the paving was old and in poor shape. I often felt that I really needed something with knobbly tyres for those bits.

NB: I realise that this isn't really 'Touring and Expedition' as it's a single day trip. However, I'm building up. And maybe sometime in the future I can fit in an overnight trip out -> sleep -> back again.

I think I want to completely change the way I plan trips, and do the whole trips going from village to village, wherever possible on roads that mostly go straight from one village to another. Rather than complicated routes on roads that are often not even labelled. I suppose I could rely on electronic navigation more. It's really helpful when you're going from Xby to Yby, when you are in Xby and find "Yby road", then half way along it changes to "Xby road" to tell you you're getting close, then you arrive in Yby. I really like it when that happens.

The trips take me a long time. Rough ground (e.g. farmer's field, unpaved or poorly maintained towpaths) slow me down. Having to worry about navigation, stop and check maps, ask people (note: I'm very thankful for the help, of which I received loads.) I can't do anything like the average speed I could if I rode over nicely paved roads that I know like the back of my hand.

On the way back I was supposed to go through Ashby Magna, Willoughby, and then to Countesthorpe. However, when I saw a sign saying "Countesthorpe 4miles" when I was still 2 miles away from Ashby Magna was too tempting to resist. That's the advantage of a more or less straight route though. Cheating doesn't make a huge difference overall.

I'm going to see if I can replan what I plan to be my next trip, Gloucester --> Leicester, to make it more 'village hopping'.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 5:42pm
I agree. I really like Chris. He's so level headed and good for cycling. Great that he's the policy advisor for British cycling.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 5:42pm
I agree. I really like Chris. He's so level headed and good for cycling. Great that he's the policy advisor for British cycling.

Re: getting to France/Holland

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 5:04pm
I used Megabus to get to Toulouse and then back from Barcelona. Bought an extra ticket for the bike, which meant I got a double seat on the bus. Tickets are around £25-£30 each from London Victoria. I'd definitely use them again.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 4:03pm
If there's no paint damage at the joint or arms then the alignment should be ok.
The other place I'd check is under the seat that the main tube didn't get slightly bent from the forces. That's where I bent the frame when I hit a wall.

hercule wrote:Another good reason to have a Streamer fairing - it wouldn't add any structural strength but it does help make the trike seem BIG!

That's the main reason I still use a Streamer Fairing after having got one.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 3:47pm
Planet-X Jobsworth toolkits seem to cover most of the bases (I haven't compared it with Yorpal's tool list) and a pretty reasonable price.

This one looks like it might be just the ticket:

http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJW30PCTK ... c-tool-kit.



Although one thing it doesn't have is a set of Allen keys (it has a multi-tool instead).

The toolbox with a place for everything should mean you can check at a glance whether everything is present and correct, just in case anyone absentmindedly forgets to return a tool to the box.

And when it comes to what to put in the vending machine you could include disposable latex gloves, wet wipes, and puncture repair patches.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 3:29pm
I'm curious, where were your feet when this happened? On my trike the only way my feet wouldn't be in the way would be if my cranks were at 12 o'clock / 6 o'clock. I'm surprised that the light seems unscathed. Another good reason to have a Streamer fairing - it wouldn't add any structural strength but it does help make the trike seem BIG!

The boom on my Trice seems a pretty tough bit of aluminium. You might want to check the alignment of the cruciform, I've heard of frames failing at that joint and that sort of force would likely be a test for the best brazing.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 3:27pm
Vorpal wrote:TBH, I think the fixed tool stand thing is probably an unnecessary expense. Lots of cyclists, even people who work on their own bikes don't bother with a proper tool stand. And if the OP wants to provide some tools and a place for cyclists to repair bikes, there are plenty of less expnsive options. Public toolstands have to be built to resist weather, tampering, and theft. The extent to which things provided by a rural bunkhouse have to do that, is entirely up to the owners, but a suggested tool / spare parts list might be of more value than information about public tool stands.
You could well be right Vorpal However that bike stand does do a couple of things:

a) it tries to keep the bike repair in one place hopefully away from the clean stuff. IME A favourite grouse of motel owners is tourists who work on their bikes in their rooms. I'd also suggest a notice "If you need to oil your chain please do it at the bike stand". The nicest people can be staggeringly inconsiderate with this kind of thing. I've even had a motel manager ask "Please don't use the towels to clean your bike". Yes, she confirmed, people do that.

b) the ugly tool-on-cables arrangement means that no one forgets to return anything and encourages (a)

c) a stand is really nice. I did without one for decades. When I finally got one it was like scales were cast from my eyes. The OP is trying to attract people remember.

Re: Would you rather..

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 3:03pm
mattsccm wrote:Rain. It can be miserable and changes the day.
Wind doesn't do anything until it actually blows you off. It just tilts the road somewhat.Wind is a hill that never seems to end. Even crosswinds are a pain; there's a sailor's saying "the apparent wind is always ahead of the beam" i.e. if the wind is as fast as you are you are always riding into it unless it's actually behind you (roughly speaking). I know whereof I speak, riding W across Kansas into the prevailing SW wind is uphill all the way even though the elevation gain in only 5000 ft in 800 miles.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 12:10pm
I'm just grateful I hadn't put the Schlumpf drive on the trike...

That would have been more expensive than most people realise.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 11:40am
Tom Richardson wrote:Tonyf33 wrote:minimal fuss.


They haven't been bombarded with 'regarding your recent accident - claim £3000' text messages yet.
And won't be if the insurers/third parties aren't involved.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 9:52am
Thanks for the link. Yes a good little vid'.
When I was a lad the only name I knew in cycling was Reg Harris and I think Chris Boardman comes in this category as being known by the general public. Of course we now have the likes of Wiggins and Hoy who would possibly top that list.

Re: Chris Boardman vid

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 2 April 2016 - 9:52am
Thanks for the link. Yes a good little vid'.
When I was a lad the only name I knew in cycling was Reg Harris and I think Chris Boardman comes in this category as being known by the general public. Of course we now have the likes of Wiggins and Hoy who would possibly top that list.

Re: Would you rather..

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 9:34am
Rain. It can be miserable and changes the day.
Wind doesn't do anything until it actually blows you off. It just tilts the road somewhat.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 9:00am
sjs wrote:greyingbeard wrote:None.
There are no dedicated cycle paths near where I live.
A few bits of road have bike sybols on the wide bits, which stop at the less-wide bits where they are needed, most of the "bike" bits or road are littered with parked cars. WELL DONE North Herts District Council.
+1.I don't live in the area, but shouldn't that be Hertfordshire County Council? County Councils are normally responsible for Highways not District Councils.

Re: This morning...

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 2 April 2016 - 8:43am
Tonyf33 wrote:minimal fuss.


They haven't been bombarded with 'regarding your recent accident - claim £3000' text messages yet.

Re: What should we have in our bunkhouse

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2016 - 8:10am
TBH, I think the fixed toolstand thing is probably an unnessary expense. Lots of cyclists, even people who work on their own bikes don't bother with a proper tool stand. And if the OP wants to provide some tools and a place for cyclists to repair bikes, there are plenty of less expnsive options. Public toolstands have to be built to resist weather, tampering, and theft. The extent to which things provided by a rural bunkhouse have to do that, is entirely up to the owners, but a suggested tool / spare parts list might be of more value than information about public tool stands.

So, here's my attempt:
Tools
*Hex keys: 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8mm
*T25 torx
*Philips screwdrivers
*Flat screwdriver
*Box wrench 8, 9 and 10mm
*Spoke wrench 3.2, 3.3 and 3.5
*these items can potentially be included in a multitool
Tire levers (have some separate ones to hand, even if they are part of a multitool)
chain tool
chain grip
patch kit
pump(s) for presta and schrader valves
Spares
inner tubes in a few different sizes
screws and nuts
cable ties
tyre boot material
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