Feed aggregator

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 4:53pm
Has anyone actually had any experience of the Dog Dazer? I've read some reports that say they're ineffectual and a waste of money, but others may take a different view.

Re: Where to tour in France?

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 4:51pm
I found this helpful https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o= ... 13285&v=4f Cut and paste link in Google cheers

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 4:32pm
The vast majority of our road network is shared but that doesn't translate to people and dogs meandering around without regard to vehicular traffic. A driver might expect to have to slow to pass pedestrians only on very minor routes and pedestrianised areas. Elsewhere routes are generally adequately wide and there is an expectation that people will be aware of their surroundings. Driving to work or the supermarket on a main road we wouldn't generally expect to be delayed whilst we alert others to our presence or whilst dogs are called to heel.

An extreme comparison perhaps, but if our main cycle routes are to play a role in making cycling as a convenient everyday form of transport then they need to be convenient and quick, like the car trip. I fully agree with those who call for us to take care when near those more vulnerable than ourselves - that is our duty - but I think a promoted cycle route should be designed to cater to the needs of cyclists, their speed and convenience. Just like the narrow country lane or bumpy access track for drivers, narrow shared use should only be considered adequate where used by low volumes of cyclists or pedestrians for leisure, not the main (cycle) route into town.

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 4:30pm
'spin out' is a fairly subjective term. If I'm in a spin class and the instructor wants us to do more than say 120 rpm then I am tempted to start protesting as my legs aren't up to it.

A quick look at one of the gear-speed calculators suggests that if you're in the top gear of 46x11, with 700c wheels, then you'll be hitting 28mph at a little over 80 rpm. It may not be a cadence that many people would want to maintain for a long period but I'm not sure it's really 'spinning-out' (whatever that means anyway).

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 4:23pm
Bells? Bloody useless. I've yet to meet the dog walker who is apparently able to hear one.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 4:09pm
Heltor Chasca wrote:Go into Bristol and all the peds are walking in the cycle lanes rather than on the pavement. AND tutting at the cyclists weaving around them.

Definitely - especially that new one on Baldwin Street. You know, the one separated from the road by a kerb. The one with cycle logos and a centre line. The one with a completely different surface to the footpath and which separated from the footpath by a line of kerbstones too. And yet pedestrians apparently can't tell the difference: it's not got motor vehicles on it, so it must be a footpath.

Re: My best route so far

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 4:01pm
Have you checked out Stevenage and North Herts CTC rides?

Some of the best riding around that part of the world is between Baldock and Buntingford via villages like Ugley and Nasty (I kid you not!)

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 3:40pm
Im afraid we (well some) are still our own worst enemy. I live on NCN25 which (much to the consternation of some cyclists) is actually a shared facility in many places. That means people can walk dogs and kids. Even a dog on a lead is unpredictable (as is a young child) so why is it vast numbers of cyclists refuse to have a bell on their bike and insist on approaching pedestrians and dog walkers (who arent blessed with eyes in the back of their head) at speed without warning.

This often leads to confrontation -As a dog walker a friendly ' its worth fitting a bell' usually results in complete silence or an aggressive response.

That aside its far worse in France and Germany where many cyclists on these shared facilities will often barge their way through without slowing,warning and without thanking anyone- they think they own these paths and pedestrians and dog walkers are treated as a nuisance by a sizeable majority. The looks of disbelief I got from ringing my bell and thanking people over 1500 miles of mainly off road / shared facility riding had to be seen to be believed...most people were shocked (and thankful) that I'd gone to the trouble .NL was different, the population were more cycle aware and the dedicated cycle paths were just that in many cases but not all. I still saw a fair bit of inconsiderate cycling on top of many of the shared paths that run along the river defences.

Re: Glazebrook Trail

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 3:28pm
I've looked at it on the map but never ridden it(it's a footpath).
However if you wish to miss out Warrington Rd Glazebury and Holcroft Lane(and I don't blame you)there's a nice route from the East Lancs Rd,follow Higher Green Rd past the old Astley Green Pit,over the canal,follow the tarmac road to the level crossing,it then becomes the very ridable Astley Road which is most dirt/gravel that spits you out in the middle of Irlam.

Re: A positive thread

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 3:21pm
Today we did a promotion for a new women's cycling scheme in a deprived inner city area that was predominantly made up of ethnic minorities. We had quite an amazing response - I can't remember doing a promo when people were so keen to get involved!

One woman made the point that despite there being as many women as men in the area there was virtually nothing for them to do (apart from house work and looking after kids), and that many of them had dreamed about the freedom and enjoyment that cycling might bring but had no idea how to get into it and no access to bikes.

It reminded me a little of this country in the latter half of the 19th century where cycling did it's own little bit to help emancipate women.

-

Yesterday, in another part of the city, we did a Ditch the Stabilisers session (well, three actually) and had lots of very happy children and parents at the end. A number of parents admitted that they'd been trying to get them to ride for ages with little success and then, after a short while with us (ably assisted by the wonderful Rachel from Sustrans) they were off and riding. It rained on them, it hailed on them....they didn't care they were just having so much fun!

Re: Lowest gear for touring including load-pulling

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 3:03pm
Sweep wrote:NATURAL ANKLING wrote:But who would really need more than 42 x 11 on a 700 x 35, you wont keep it up long even with no load so the top gears over 100 " are a bit academic, 53 x 11 is for he-men

I have 11-34 and 22-32-42 on a very very well used 8-speed bike - used for load lugging/day rides/around town.

Touring will often be on 37/38 tyres, zapping around town 28mm.

Have you never felt the need for a 44T big ring?

I have been considering it.

I changed from a Deore 22/34/44 to a Spa cycles 24/36/46 last year and have done Dunkirk to Perpignan and a tour of South Island since. I'm on 700 rims with 35mm tyres and 11-34 cassette and I use both extremes on a daily basis. The 22 or 24 I find essential on long, steep climbs and would struggle with anything higher (I struggle anyhow!) and use the highest gears when I pick up a tail wind or on descents. I find it spins out at about 28mph and there were a couple of times on both tours where I swallowed up miles at that sort of speed due to tail winds. Felt so sorry for the poor people coming the other way....

Glazebrook Trail

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 11:36am
Does anyone (reohn2 perhaps???) know if this is entirely cyclable? Bikehike's os map shows the rights of way to be no issue, just wondering at the state of the surface really.
I'm thinking Dunham Grove across the East Lancs and onto Holcroft Lane via Little Woolden Hall Farm nr the M62.
I'm really sick of main roads now and after as much a non road route to Warbuton Bridge as I can find.

Re: cyclingabout

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 9:37am
I was not aware of this website, so thanks. US based so slanted towards their views by the looks of it, but all good. Will keep an eye on it.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 9:06am
In Saturday's "Times" there was a heart warming story in the Doggy Births and Deaths section about a pooch that had suffered severe internal injuries due to a collision with a cyclist.
The dog was restored to health (hurrah) by extensive veterinary surgery .
The article didn't mention how the cyclist came out of the incident.

cyclingabout

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 8:23am
andymiller wrote:Tell us a bit about it?

A sentence or two, or some copied and pasted text might motivate more people to click the link.

Andy just click on it. Not that tricky is it? I subscribed to cycling about's YouTube channel a few months back. It's a bit cheesy, but there are some good tips and ideas. You never know you may enjoy it [emoji6]

EDIT: Thank you PB. A refreshing thread. [emoji106]

Re: Cycling in groups

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 8:06am
Depends on the size and purpose of the group - taking 14 sets of tyre levers isn't necessary on a group expedition...

Re: Cycling in groups

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 5 April 2016 - 7:58am
Grandad wrote:As far as possible we are trying to insist people have spare innertubes and a serviceable repair kit.

My inclination would be to say that anyone not taking this basic precaution should be abandoned if they get a puncture

It is one thing to insist people have the correct kit. We found it is quite another for them to be able to successfully use it when they are cold, wet and tired, in the rain, with an audience that wants to get moving, repeatedly....

Re: cyclingabout

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 5 April 2016 - 7:24am
Tell us a bit about it?

A sentence or two, or some copied and pasted text might motivate more people to click the link.
Syndicate content
 
  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cycling UK is a trading name of Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) a company limited by guarantee, registered in England no: 25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales charity no: 1147607 and in Scotland charity no: sco42541. Registered office: Parklands, Railton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 9JX.

Copyright © CTC 2016

Terms and Conditions