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Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 15 May 2016 - 6:57pm
I thought Chris Froome did it in 2013, there was debate as to whether the mechanic should have been allowed to give him a push start, as he had elected to swap bikes but had no mechanical problems. Here's an article-

http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/07/ ... ial_295701

I've often wondered whether any bottles and clothing handed to riders at the tops of climbs are really just weights, to give them an advantage descending.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

FarOeuf wrote:, if you want to ride faster they're more aerodynamic, etc, etc....


Now, there is a lot which I agree with in your post, particularly in regard to having a choice being a good thing, and it's just a case of going with whatever is your preference. But I have to object to unsubstantiated claims to scientific fact.

I take it that your are assuming that, because the frame bag presents a slightly narrower front profile (sans rider, at least), that means it is more aerodynamic, but aerodynamics is not that simple. I could equally argue that, since an equivalent volume of panniers would be mounted further back (and crucially, behind the rider) and lower to the ground, then panniers would be more aerodynamic - there is a reason that fighter jets and fast cars tend to be wedge shaped.

And I would equally be making an unsubstantiated claim based on opinion, not fact. At the end of the day, any differences are going to be trivial, and dependant on the exact setup - and even the materials used.

I am not trying to be argumentative, I just think that spurious claims of 'fact' on a matter that is almost entirely subjective, does nothing to help matters.

Re: Agressive close pass Bath area

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 5:07pm
As nice as the area of Bath and it's surrounds are, I've had more run ins with with anti-social idiots than much rougher parts of the country I've lived in. I'm sorry it happened to you and I hope it was just sunny, high jinx mischievousness rather than genuine maliciousness.

I'll swap a spin on your bent for being your security wingman [emoji6]

Agressive close pass Bath area

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 4:55pm
As there are one or two locals here I thought it meet to post this. Was travelling along Monkton Combe village high street in a westbound direction at about 5pm this afternoon (Sunday May 15). No other vehicles or cycles in sight. I became aware of engine noise to the rear, glanced in my mirror to see a dark blue saloon car approaching rapidly from behind. Before I could react, the vehicle passed at speed with the passenger's left arm fully extended out of the window, either to steal my admittedly very cool hat, or to make a crude gesture. As the street bends and obscured my line of sight, I did not have time to note make or registration other than that the final letters were WPU.

Not really what you'd expect in the urban badlands of Monkton Combe (Harry Potter would find it very nostalgic) but that's cars for you I suppose, they go places.

I hope this was just a one off, but in case it's a serial offender I am recording it here.

Re: Janet Street Porter

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 3:13pm
Bicycler wrote:Of course there are inconsiderate cyclists. Where did either of us imply otherwise? For that matter there are inconsiderate pedestrians. Inconsiderate cyclists and the infinitely greater danger of motor vehicles haven't yet made walking the streets anywhere near as unfeasible to the average person as cycling.

Covered in the Wiki article:

Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung considered indeed that "there must be some people who behave in the wrong way; they act as scapegoats and objects of interest for the normal ones

Re: Janet Street Porter

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 2:38pm
reohn2 wrote:Bicycler wrote:ANTONISH wrote:IMO pedestrians often get the worse of things- being herded to inconvenient crossings and always having to be aware that the pavement may not always be exclusively used by pedestrians.
Nah, I don't buy that. Pedestrians are also victims of the tyranny of the motocracy but cyclists have it worse...
Absolutely spot on!
And it's a disgrace that it continues as it does,with cycling organisations(no names mentioned)folding meekly to the motoring bullies.
ANTONISH wrote:And there are no cycling bullies riding through red lights on pedestrian crossings and riding too fast on shared use paths or cycling on dedicated pedestrian paths ?
Of course there are inconsiderate cyclists. Where did either of us imply otherwise? For that matter there are inconsiderate pedestrians. Inconsiderate cyclists and the infinitely greater danger of motor vehicles haven't yet made walking the streets anywhere near as unfeasible to the average person as cycling.

Re: Before Pulling In For Car - Indicate or Not ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 11:26am
Mainly I indicate before a left hand turn when being followed by a fellow cyclist. I will do the same with a car on a narrow road, mainly as a warning that I could be slowing. On single track roads, I will tend to pull in and stop without signalling to allow a following vehicle to pass. Sometimes I will wave a hesitant motorist to overtake when I can see the road ahead is clear, and I feel there is sufficient room for them to do so safely.

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 May 2016 - 11:15am
bohrsatom wrote: I cycled up a very short 14% hill just fine but honestly the kinds of hills which could cause your front wheel to come off the ground will be too steep to ride up anyway!
Try cycling around Devon/Somerset! I just managed the toll road up from Porlock; the hill from Lynmouth to Lynton defeated me due to front wheel lift. But I agree such hills (>20%) are not common, and can of course be walked.

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 May 2016 - 11:00am
We have a couple of kit threads in the 'too good to lose' section

This one is very detailed viewtopic.php?f=42&t=85590

This one is about minimising kit viewtopic.php?f=16&t=48438

Both threads have some disucssion and opinions about whether certain items are needed, benefits of some items, etc.

Of course, you also have bring stuff for the little one. My advice, for having done this with kids: bring something that will entertain the little one, despite extra weight. His favorite toys, an electronic gizmo (ipad?), whatever works best for him. Not too much; just a couple of things because sometimes, one parent needs to go use the loo, while the other one is cooking or setting up a tent or something.

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 May 2016 - 10:52am
With two of you, you can share the load of tents/sleeping equipment/cookware etc which makes getting everything into rear panniers more achievable. When I go touring with my GF I have a 20L Alpkit dry bag on my rack containing the camping equipment and she has the 13L version with stove, cookware, etc. We don't take front panniers because I have a carbon fork, so no lugs, but even if I did the extra weight of a rack + bags is at least 2kg and that's without putting anything in then.



We don't have kids so if you did go rear-pannier-only I'm not sure you could find space for their stuff too. It might be a struggle but you can always try it and see. A trailer may give you the extra space you need.

In terms of weight distribution issues you will be fine. We rode 4 months using the setup described above with no real problems. I cycled up a very short 14% hill just fine but honestly the kinds of hills which could cause your front wheel to come off the ground will be too steep to ride up anyway!

Re: Commute to train then walk other end:rucksack/panniers-

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 8:44am
Update is that I'm sticking with the Osprey Momentum 30. It's certainly big enough with some good organisation. It feels so much better than my old rucksack (not huge surprise). I'm using the laptop area to carry my work shirt and trousers, keeps them nice and flat. The other areas are big enough for lunch boxes, 2 phones, pens, wet wipes, work,ID, passes, half a dozen eggs ( I take them in for mates at work, from my hens), extra bike kit ( leggings, spare tubes,mini pump, tools etc) and the lid lock is good. I'm still getting used to the pockets, where's best to keep everything.

I used the rain cover last week, a mile into the ride it tipped down , shoes filled up, bag and contents stayed dry.

My only gripe would be that for a bag of this price and pedigree, Opsrey couldn't supply "keepers" to keep the straps tidy, unbelievable. So I resort to elastic bands to stop the flapping.

Nice bag for on and off the bike. The Deuter trans Alpin seems to be in a similar bracket and well reviewed.

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

andymiller wrote:Take what you'd take for backpacking. Simple as that. (OK add in an inner tube or two, bike pump and allen keys etc).

+1

You seem to have 2 potential baggage issues.
- Not enough capacity in luggage carriers - easy to check, just pack everything and see if it fits
- Balance on bikes caused by all weight at rear. As gloomyandy suggests, do a trial run. This does't need to involve an overnight camp, though that would be better; the main point is to load everything including child on the bikes and ride for a reasonable distance - approx. what you expect your daily mileage to be. Make sure you have a bail-out option in case you've misjudged.

The biggest problem I find with a lot of weight on the back is that the front wheel can tend to lift on really steep uphills. The solution for a first tour is simply avoid steep uphills.

I've never carried a child on a bike but the average toddler or older will probably weigh as much as a typical touring load. and will be sitting higher if in a child seat, thus increasing any balance/stability issues. I'd have thought the trailer would be the best option but others wil have more experience of this.

Re: Before Pulling In For Car - Indicate or Not ?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 7:54am
I'm with Vorpal regarding simply looking back. I find that cars are generally uncomfortable trying to overtake unless they know you've seen them. So I block the road and ignore them until getting to a passing place, then move to the side while glancing over my shoulder. Almost all drivers take this as an invitation to come past - many wave in thanks despite me not having explicitly invited the overtake. It also has the advantage (especially on step climbs) that you can keep both hands on the bars.

Sent from my XT1039 using Tapatalk

Re: Janet Street Porter

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 6:53am
Thanks for that! Read a lot of that Wiki link, now I'm really depressed, if half of it is true, we really have got no chance of changing attitudes!!

Re: or in the air - speed trap gets its man?

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 6:50am
There is an urban legend about a police speed trap unit that picked up something doing over 300mph - that was the reading on the display before the machine stopped working. A couple of seconds later a Tornado jet goes screaming overhead. The police complain to the RAF about their now defunct speed trap. The RAF apologised saying the plane in question had been flying a low level warfare exercise and had detected a 'ground based radar threat' which it neutralised with electronic counter measures. Had the plane been flying a 'weapons hot' exercise it would have dispatched a missile as well.

Re: First cycle tour - kit advice

Take what you'd take for backpacking. Simple as that. (OK add in an inner tube or two, bike pump and allen keys etc).

A pair of rear panniers come to about 42 litres - so a medium-sized backpack. If you need a bit more put a dry bag on the top ofbthe rack.

Most people you see out on the road don't use front panniers.

I'd suggest having a system where you put things back into the same pannier every time - otherwise you risk going mad playing 'which bag is it in?' when you need something.

I use a 50mm webbing strap to secure my panniers and provide some extra support. But so far as I can see I'm the only person in the entire world who does this.

Re: Janet Street Porter

Cycling UK Forum - On the road - 15 May 2016 - 1:45am
I was quite surprised to find this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scapegoating

AFAICS It covers all Street-Porter's criticisms and concerns and explains why she and others hold what are, after all, quite peculiar views. The negative attention currently given to cycling and the obsession about helmets is really rich ground for some psychological research but I think Wikipedia has got it broadly covered. I like the idea that drivers blame cyclists for the congestion caused by, well, drivers and that drivers feel that cyclists should wear helmets to protect them from the dangers created by, well, drivers. The chair of the discussion was clearly unable to see the irony of it all, if not the hilarity.

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 15 May 2016 - 12:37am
I'm pretty sure I saw Sir Brad 'swap' bike cause of a mechanical issue during a TdF mountain ITT but can't find anything on Youtube.

Re: One bike for climbing, one for descending?

Cycling UK Forum - Racing - 14 May 2016 - 11:03pm
My understanding is that the rules don't allow for a pre-prepared changeover - i.e. someone waiting at a pre-arranged spot with a bike - so the rider will have to signal to their team car, which on a mountain stage is a very variable thing time wise as team cars can get stuck some distance behind riders.

The bike change strategy has, however, been used a few times on mountain time trial stages that don't have a summit finish to switch from a climbing bike to a TT bike at the crest of the main/final climb - the rider still has to signal for service but they will have their own car following immediately behind & the changeover will have been pre-planned - to take advantage of the aero advantage of a TT bike on the fast finish.

Rick.
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