Cycling UK Forum - On the road

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Updated: 28 weeks 1 day ago

Re: Recommend me a new road bike tyre

11 May 2016 - 2:59pm
it will be an interesting experiment to see if what you eventually settle on is better than the Rubino Pros and worth the extra money.

Rubino Pro would have been my recommendation with an eye to wallet as well as performance.

Recommend me a new road bike tyre

11 May 2016 - 2:46pm
Looking for a recommendation for some new road bike tyres.

My Vittoria Rubino pro's have bit the dust.

I'm after something that's fast and with some decent grip in the wet. Was thinking continental Grand Prix 4000's


Thanks in advance

Re: Janet Street Porter

11 May 2016 - 2:27pm
Anyone remember the old Spitting Image puppet of JSP? I think it was called Janet Street Germ.

Driverless cars in UK this year

11 May 2016 - 12:53pm
According to NS: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23030732-600-london-to-see-fleet-of-driverless-cars-on-public-roads-this-year/.
Anyone in the area planning to test the cycle-friendly nature of these pods?

Re: Janet Street Porter

11 May 2016 - 9:35am
Si wrote:I liked the piece.

As related elsewhere it shows a subtle change in attitude. We no longer have the loonie leftie cyclist howling against the common sense of the normalised behaviour of the masses and establishment; rather the loonie is quite clearly the any-cyclist ranting away at an ever higher pitch, going further into the twilight zone, while the calm, sensible establishment view is the pro-cycling one. And then Rees-Mogg puts the cherry on the top by giving the pompous, upper-class-tory-boy view.....I was just surprised that he didn't demand dedicated fox hunting lanes be built through London.

Good point!

Puts the SPD is on the other foot

Re: Tram lines...

11 May 2016 - 8:22am
Wow - no mention of clothing at all.

Slightly concerned that "being aware of what's around you" involved stopping and only then looking around. I'd recommend looking around continuously...

Is it only me that thinks that the "cross rails at 90" needs an explanation? I mean it's sufficiently subtle that the lady involved in the OP didn't understand what had happened.
I find I can avoid dangers much more easily if I know *why* they happen.

Re: Falling Off

11 May 2016 - 8:17am
And the worst is when you think it's a bit icy, so you pull up, pop a foot down, and that foot promptly slides out from under you...

Re: Falling Off

11 May 2016 - 8:15am
Up until last November I was happy to say I had not fallen off in thirty years.

Apart from childhood prangs the only offs I had previously were (1) Around 15 years old, racing to school, downhill left turn in the rain: both wheels slid from under me. As motor-racing commentators say: it was ambition over adhesive. (2) Late teens, art college, riding with an A2 portfolio under my left arm, which I did regularly, reached down to the down tube for the gears (that's how long ago it was) and I don't know what happened but the next moment I was in a tangle on the ground. (3) Early '80s commuting home in the rain, mis-judges a pavement dip which had a bigger lip than I expected due to it being concealed in a puddle, hit it at an oblique angle and went down.

After that thirty years of crash free riding. Until November when I was taking my 7yo daughter on her BoBike seat along the canal tow path. There are three very steep bridges near Kensal Rise. Three in a row and spaced out, so awkward for both of us to get off the bike and walk. Over time we experimented with various approaches: speed up first, or go steady and gear-down. On this occasion I tried it slowly in a very low gear and near the top, with my daughter's weight behind me, the front wheel just lost lateral adhesion on one of the pedal strokes and flicked sideways without warning. We both shouldered the ground laughing.

Re: Janet Street Porter

11 May 2016 - 8:08am
I liked the piece.

As related elsewhere it shows a subtle change in attitude. We no longer have the loonie leftie cyclist howling against the common sense of the normalised behaviour of the masses and establishment; rather the loonie is quite clearly the any-cyclist ranting away at an ever higher pitch, going further into the twilight zone, while the calm, sensible establishment view is the pro-cycling one. And then Rees-Mogg puts the cherry on the top by giving the pompous, upper-class-tory-boy view.....I was just surprised that he didn't demand dedicated fox hunting lanes be built through London.

Re: Baggy shorts for commuting and leisure riding

11 May 2016 - 8:03am
I've had humvees for years. very good. but the newest pair I have - the lower pocket design has changed a bit and it's harder to get a modern phone in. Plus the inner shorts appear tighter.

Re: Janet Street Porter

11 May 2016 - 8:00am
Andrew Gillingham deserves a sainthood for his patience in the face of that storm of rubbish.

I fear I might have resorted to violence in the same situation.

Re: Tram lines...

11 May 2016 - 7:57am
https://youtu.be/GCLgstX0jHk

that's that sorted then

Re: Janet Street Porter

10 May 2016 - 11:16pm
Cycling in London seems to have very few rules and regulations...... JS-P unlike anywhere else, of course.
She owns a bike, likes cycling and is pro cycling. Where - on roads? She lived 10years in Clerkenwell. Did she cycle? If not why not?

Re: Falling Off

10 May 2016 - 9:56pm
I don't think the Countess admitted to being a 'cyclist', she did say she had done some riding with the children when they were younger, so she is probably relatively new to this style of riding. She did admit to having had 3 'off's' while 'training' for the charity ride she is about to embark on..... however we did not learn of the reasons, may have been when she first got on the bike and unused to it, due to fact she is trying to get used to cleats (as previously referred to) or just a misjudgement while riding with others.

I have a few offs not attributable to other road users; gravel on a bend on a descent, wet greasy road on a bend on a descent (twice), unclipping issues in the early days of using clipless cleats and something jamming in mudguard (it was dark so did not see what object was). Others were stupid things like putting my foot down when stopping and missing my balance (twice while pregnant so presumably due to pregnancy clumsiness or similar).

Re: Tram lines...

10 May 2016 - 8:38pm
Really approved of the tram system in Bordeaux when we visited last October. Cheap, stress free, run late into the evening, so you can go out and get home and you can push your bike on outside rush hours
Keep meaning to try a ride on the Wolves - Brum tram service. There's one obvious difference though. Bordeaux seems to have wider streets.
The section of the tram line that I drive along most often has a line of yellow dots painted on the road so that you can see where the tram need to be - and where not to park your car. Some stretches look as if close passes might be the norm

Mind you, at least a tram isn't going to suddenly cut in on you!

Re: Baggy shorts for commuting and leisure riding

10 May 2016 - 8:31pm
I have some of these http://www.mountainwarehouse.com/runnin ... x?cl=Black Excellent for the money

Re: Janet Street Porter

10 May 2016 - 8:16pm
al_yrpal wrote: This article is interesting. Can the 'internet of moving things' end traffic jams? - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36215293 But as we all know things will still get gridlocked if there is just too much traffic and it will come..

Al

Large parts of London are already running at effectively 100% capacity with traffic held back by the UTC system in some places to prevent others gridlocking entirely.

Much of that link seems to focus more on other things such as optimising deliveries or taxi income.

There's only really two potential gains to be had for vehicular traffic. The first is system optimised routing but that would require almost everyone to follow given routes and to be fair is a fairly minor gain. The second is reduced headways as a result of automated vehicles but that's a couple of decades yet.

Re: Before Pulling In For Car - Indicate or Not ?

10 May 2016 - 6:50pm
For a following car, which is the situation the OP was asking about, I will only very rarely if ever indicate left or give a slowing down signal but I will give a "you can pass me now" wave. I do this at most two seconds before slowing and pulling in to a suitable place. Do it too early, they might try to overtake where it's too narrow. Do it too late, they won't have time to complete the overtake before I reach the end of the lay-by or passing place; I will slow down to let them pass but I don't want to have to stop. Obviously the longer the space which I've pulled over into, the less time I can leave between signal wave and pulling in.

An oncoming car is a very different situation. For one thing, it's possible to pass in face to face, so to speak, in a narrower gap than one which allows overtaking -- as long as both of you take care. Often the first thing I'll do with an oncoming vehicle is to move slightly further out in order to "claim" some space, get them to move over a bit more and slow down. The vast majority do. I might then move back in so that we can squeeze past each other. A driver who slows down and/or stops and/or moves over significantly gets a wave of thanks. There's no need for signals in this situation unless I'm indicating that I'll pull into a gap, especially if it's on "their" side of the road.

Re: Fed up!

10 May 2016 - 5:45pm
rmurphy195 wrote:I'm coming to the conclusion that a certain class of people take great pleasure in just shoving everyone else out of the way. ...
Perhaps.
rmurphy195 wrote:... Maybe I should start shoving back ?
I'm sure it wouldn't give you any pleasure so probably not something to start.

Re: Janet Street Porter

10 May 2016 - 5:34pm
What a sad argument from someone who was President of the Ramblers Association, how come she didn't acknowledge that more bikes = cleaner air, more bikes = less noise, more bikes = less congestion. I thought Andrew Gilligan did very well, attempting to answer hysterical arguments in a reasoned manner. I am sure there are plenty of examples of poor cycling, much the same as there are plenty of examples of poor driving and from what I've seen on the few occasions I've been in London, plenty of examples of poor behaviour by pedestrians. As for the "must wear a helmet" rant...
 
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