Cycling UK Forum - On the road

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Updated: 14 weeks 4 days ago

Re: or in the air - speed trap gets its man?

14 May 2016 - 1:11pm
Not me.
Our parrot was in her cage.Parrot.jpgButter wouldn't melt.
Looks cuddly eh?
You try putting your hand in there!

She likes me though.

or in the air - speed trap gets its man?

14 May 2016 - 12:17pm
Police snap parrot going at 1.5 times speed limit

http://www.thelocal.de/20160513/police-snap-parrot-going-at-15-times-speed-limit


but who is going to pay the speeding fine?

Re: Before Pulling In For Car - Indicate or Not ?

14 May 2016 - 12:11pm
I pull in / over and give the thumbs up with an outstretched right arm when Im happy for them to pass..(ie safe for both us ). It seems to work, plenty of drivers acknowledge it with a thanks of sorts - happy days

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 10:33pm
In Dublin at a set of lights one of my colleagues was waiting to cross when a car jumped a red light.

First reaction of the others around her was to hold hands out to stop people stepping off the kerb. Then the stepped forward as one and stopped the car (hands raised) and gave them a mouthful.
The driver then had to wait for everyone to cross before they could continue.

My South African colleague was astounded, particularly that they'd stopped the driver, but I pointed out that by stopping the driver they'd reduced the incentive for anyone else...

Not sure I could do that in the UK - though I do similar with side roads and other crossings.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 10:28pm
It seems Julie Rand on her LEJOG also had a close pass by a cyclist.Descending the road, however, 3 things happen simultaneously which show how quickly things can change from exhilaration to excruciating while you're cycling: first of all a Polish coach overtakes us at tad too close for comfort just before the road bottoms out. Then a roadie skims silently passed my right shoulder as I'm about to move out for the bend. Seconds later a large sheep to my left decides it's time to see if the grass really is greener on the other side of the road.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 10:16pm
Si wrote:Ah, but were the morris men wearing hiviz, and were they morrissing more than 2 abreast? And I'm not even going to ask if they were wearing morris helmets.Good one!

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 9:50pm
Si wrote:Ah, but were the morris men wearing hiviz, and were they morrissing more than 2 abreast? And I'm not even going to ask if they were wearing morris helmets.

I'm with you. I got 'morrised out' at a folk festival a few years back. I can't do the bells or stick clacking without going into a spasm now. THEN at a nearby wassailing I was invited to join a local group recently 'coz I looked like I could'! Whatever that meant.

Re: Janet Street Porter

13 May 2016 - 9:25pm
Bicycler wrote:ANTONISH wrote:IMO pedestrians often get the worse of things- being herded to inconvenient crossings and always having to be aware that the pavement may not always be exclusively used by pedestrians.
Nah, I don't buy that. Pedestrians are also victims of the tyranny of the motocracy but cyclists have it worse. Pedestrians mostly have pavements to their own exclusive use. Cyclists virtually never have their own exclusive space. Cycle tracks have the same kind of rubbish crossings that pedestrians have. I am confident that I could walk any road in the country that I am legally permitted to if I so wished, yet there are a good number I could not cycle on because of the danger. We don't have adults who feel unable to walk across town because of the perceived danger of doing so, yet huge proportions of the population feel unable to make ever simple journeys by cycle because of fear of being injured or killed. Pedestrians may use all of the rights of way network, any newly constructed cycle paths and all public space. Cyclists may use only a small proportion of the rights of way network and shared use cycle facilities are often poorly suited to their needs.

Absolutely spot on!
And it's a disgrace that it continues as it does,with cycling organisations(no names mentioned)folding meekly to the motoring bullies.

Re: Sally Shalloe

13 May 2016 - 8:34pm
Middleton Boulevard is on the signposted route from the Jubilee to the main campus of Nottingham University. According to the BBC, the judge described this as "an accident waiting to happen". Indeed anyone cycling or walking along this route must cross 11 lanes carrying heavy, fast-moving traffic, albeit assisted with the help of 4 separate pelican crossings. That is 11 lanes too many.

For many years, I have been arguing to Nottingham City Council and to the University of Nottingham that the ambition should be proposed to create a completely traffic-free route connecting the campuses. I have made it clear that I would not expect the ambition to be realised soon, but it should be put forward as part of the university/council masterplan - as an example of such an ambition, I gave the cycling bridge currently being built over the Amsterdam-Rijnkanaal at a cost of 24 million euros, which was first entered in the master-plan for Utrecht council in 1993.

I have in the past never argued for such a traffic-free route on safety grounds and I remain very hesitant about doing so even now. The primary function would be to enhance the pleasure and conviviality of daily travel between the campuses. Developments at the University of Nottingham make the argument for such a route much stronger than when I first put the proposal forward: the Jubilee Campus has now expanded considerably but, more importantly, new student residences on and close to Jubilee mean inter-campus travel now occurs on a massive scale.

As part of the University's expansion, new traffic lights have been installed at the end of Triumph Road to facilitate the movement of cars to and from the campus. I guess that the University will have had to make a financial contribution for this change to the public road system. But I know of no changes that have been made to facilitate the movements of pedestrians and cyclists: the University's answer is to bus students between campuses. (When I started the buses were single-decker; they are now double-decker.) The only response I have ever had to my proposal was from the Head Of Estates who dismissed it as "unrealistic".

I wonder whether I am the only one to thing that it is scandalous to bus students, most of whom are (currently at least) fit and healthy, when the distances are so short. I wonder also why nobody in a position of influence in a UK university is willing to lead the way in setting ambitions for their students' welfare.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 8:32pm
It seems all the idiots are out lately.
I was overtaken by a cyclist today. Coming up to some lights in Horwich, he decided to mount the footpath and cut back in when they turned green. A further set of 'roadworks lights' in Adlington he decided to go through the fenced pedestrian route to get through.
The following cyclist who overtook me then proceeded to overtake MrIDontNeedToStopAtLights and did so without any kind of shoulder check. Luckily the driver of the car coming up to pass him moved way out into the opposite lane to avoid hitting him.
Flippin summer bunnies bringing their crap habits out from hibernation.
I'm actually looking forward to winter again when they all park their bikes till it's warm again.

Re: Janet Street Porter

13 May 2016 - 8:21pm
Bicycler wrote:ANTONISH wrote:IMO pedestrians often get the worse of things- being herded to inconvenient crossings and always having to be aware that the pavement may not always be exclusively used by pedestrians.
Nah, I don't buy that. Pedestrians are also victims of the tyranny of the motocracy but cyclists have it worse. Pedestrians mostly have pavements to their own exclusive use. Cyclists virtually never have their own exclusive space. Cycle tracks have the same kind of rubbish crossings that pedestrians have. I am confident that I could walk any road in the country that I am legally permitted to if I so wished, yet there are a good number I could not cycle on because of the danger. We don't have adults who feel unable to walk across town because of the perceived danger of doing so, yet huge proportions of the population feel unable to make ever simple journeys by cycle because of fear of being injured or killed. Pedestrians may use all of the rights of way network, any newly constructed cycle paths and all public space. Cyclists may use only a small proportion of the rights of way network and shared use cycle facilities are often poorly suited to their needs.

Quite.
Any 'cycle paths' on the pavement here you have to give way to cars crossing them and pedestrians on them, whether they are down as shared or not, as pedestrians walk across the whole pavement regardless. On the off-road cycle tracks you still for all practical purposes have to give way to some extent to pedestrians and dogs. On the roads, the cars see to it that on the whole they are the boss, they park across cycle lanes and cut into them when it suits them.

There is not one single place I can think of here where a cyclist has either exclusive use or a right of way over everyone else. Not one.

Re: Sally Shalloe

13 May 2016 - 7:31pm
Unless and until start adding a "0" to such sentences road "manners" will never improve.

Re: Sally Shalloe

13 May 2016 - 6:40pm
The motorcyclist has now been sentenced to 2 years in jail and a 5 year driving ban which will start when he is released from jail. He was doing 90mph in a 40 zone and was unable to stop in time before hitting the cyclist, who was crossing at a toucan crossing on the Nottingham Ring Road.

In a double irony, Sally was a keen motorcyclist herself and was also an expert on road safety.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 5:35pm
Ah, but were the morris men wearing hiviz, and were they morrissing more than 2 abreast? And I'm not even going to ask if they were wearing morris helmets.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 5:30pm
MikeF wrote:Last night I was outside a rural pub on a minor unlit road except for pub lights. It was half light with morris dancers in the road. A cyclist pedalled by on a road bike at a speed of 20mph (my estimate}, passing very close and startling many people. He didn't give any warning or reduce speed, didn't appear to have any front light, but could have had an ineffectual blinky and had a red blinking rear light.

The effect of his actions generated cries of "knock him off", "throw a stick at him", "put a stick through his spokes", "bloody cyclists", "next time ……." etc.

I'm sure it left many feeling they needed "to get their own back" by giving cyclists a close pass, just as he had given them a close pass. At the moment there are campaigns etc to request a minimum legal passing distance of cyclists, but actions like this stir up an enormous amount of hatred/prejudice against cyclists by the much larger non cycling community. If we want consideration from others we need to give consideration as well!

Sounds like just another stupid twunt! I've got every sympathy, and would probably have shouted at him as well. BUT, what is this we? Did you know him? Do I know him? What on earth had he got to do with anyone? As has been said many times, an [rude word removed] is an [rude word removed] in a van, car, lorry and on a bike. So is the logic that, if I show 'consideration' in Somerset, a driver in Cornwall will be more considerate? Wouldn't that be just lovely

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 5:01pm
People are born *****. They don't suddenly become one when they buy a bike/car/private jet etc.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 4:21pm
whoof wrote:MikeF wrote: I'm sure it left many feeling they needed "to get their own back" by giving cyclists a close pass, just as he had given them a close pass. At the moment there are campaigns etc to request a minimum legal passing distance of cyclists, but actions like this stir up an enormous amount of hatred/prejudice against cyclists by the much larger non cycling community. If we want consideration from others we need to give consideration as well!

The person riding the bike sounds like a right idiot. Of course we should all ride as courteously as we can and were appropriate challenge other people's bad behaviour.

But anyone considering any of the action above would be a far greater idiot.

On the road outside my house drivers exceed the speed limit and regularly drive whilst using mobile phones. In the last couple of years three people have driven (at speed) into parked cars outside my house, one with enough force to write-off my neighbours car. They have demolished the wall of the church and driven through a shop window. If I were to "get my own back" by saying lobbing bricks at passing cars I would quite rightly be dealt with by the police.

People seem to have the mental capacity to be able to disassociate a 'bad' driver from all drivers but for some reason cannot do the same when someone is riding a bike. Cyclists should give consideration to others and the general public need to consider their prejudices.

I can give you the "some reason". Cyclists are an outgroup, to which the hard of thinking individuals we're talking about do not belong. They do belong to the group "motorists", so will not ascribe to all motorists the actions of a minority. They do not belong to the group "cyclists", and so can do so without condemning themselves.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 1:17pm
MikeF wrote: I'm sure it left many feeling they needed "to get their own back" by giving cyclists a close pass, just as he had given them a close pass. At the moment there are campaigns etc to request a minimum legal passing distance of cyclists, but actions like this stir up an enormous amount of hatred/prejudice against cyclists by the much larger non cycling community. If we want consideration from others we need to give consideration as well!

The person riding the bike sounds like a right idiot. Of course we should all ride as courteously as we can and were appropriate challenge other people's bad behaviour.

But anyone considering any of the action above would be a far greater idiot.

On the road outside my house drivers exceed the speed limit and regularly drive whilst using mobile phones. In the last couple of years three people have driven (at speed) into parked cars outside my house, one with enough force to write-off my neighbours car. They have demolished the wall of the church and driven through a shop window. If I were to "get my own back" by saying lobbing bricks at passing cars I would quite rightly be dealt with by the police.

People seem to have the mental capacity to be able to disassociate a 'bad' driver from all drivers but for some reason cannot do the same when someone is riding a bike. Cyclists should give consideration to others and the general public need to consider their prejudices.

Re: What a palaver taking a bike by train

13 May 2016 - 1:15pm
Samuel D wrote:That is a good price! Can you even move around London for that price these days? When I lived there a decade ago, ticket prices already felt slightly insane.

They must have spent about 12 quid on paper and ink for you!

well in fact I could get from Liverpool st London all the way up to north coast Norfolk, Sheringham & return for that price . I do have a senior rail card but still a good price. I will be using advanced tickets more and more.

Re: Close passes BY cyclists

13 May 2016 - 12:24pm
I was actually thinking about posting something along these exact lines.

I've been walking to work recently - living about ten minutes walk door to door from the office at the moment - and four times in the past three days I have been nearly hit by someone on a bike. Twice was the same person and they have received a gobful from me. This all happened on the same stretch of footpath which has been narrowed considerably because of building works. The problem is though that each of these persons would likely not be in the same camp as those likely to be on here. They are almost exclusively riding cheap mountain bikes, but the non-cycling community would put them in the same camp.

This mornings's idiot looked right at me as he rode past me (which is when he got a mouthful) but totally ignored me otherwise - he was shortly followed by a unicyclist!! Who was on the road but then jumped on the path to avoid the traffic lights!!
 
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