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Updated: 28 weeks 5 days ago

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

6 April 2016 - 7:45am
[XAP]Bob wrote:Then there are people who react aggressively to those who *have* bells.
Frankly I already have an audible warning system - it's called my voice.

Indeed. I'd say that of dog walkers on shared paths, about 20% glare at you like you've sworn at them if you ring a bell, about 50% do apparently respond but only once you're so close that you've virtually had to stop anyway, and 30% are apparently completely mutton.

Hence I consider them useless, which is why I don't have one.

I think the glarers consider a bell to be the equivalent of a horn, and since they (like many motorists) use theirs to say "get out of the way!" or "you [rude word removed]!" when they are driving, they don't like being on the receiving end of one.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

6 April 2016 - 6:00am
I've never met a bell that can compete with my voice - the air sound does, but that's not something I'd use when pedestrians were around (well, not often)

Pan Eurpoean Tour

6 April 2016 - 2:36am
A new friend of mine has given me a challenge - to cycle tour from Paris to Milan through the Alps this late Summer - a distance of only 528.5 miles!

I used to cycle tour in my teens but as someone in his early 50's I regard myself pretty much as a fresher to it, so have joined a gym and will take up the offer of being provided with a work-out plan as I certainly need to get in shape for such a fantastic journey.

An ex-army friend who is really into bikes advises me that to save money buy a bike that has a good frame and wheels, then I can change the breaks for better ones. I am reasonably adept at cycle maintained after doing my own on various bikes as a teenager plus am good at figuring out how things work to be able to fix them.

He also said get out into North Wales and The Pennines to practise hill cycling.

Although I have not committed to, my friend to do the tour, to be honest I am going to do it regardless as I am really excited about the amazing breath taking scenery and views that there will be.

This seems like a once in a life time opportunity to see some great countries in Europe at our pace in a relatively inexpensive way, while cycling and being in the great outdoors.

I seriously, can't wait!!

If you have any advice, suggestions, ideas or comments they would be greatly appreciated as Cycle Touring, like the route of the planned Pan European Tour, is unexplored territory!

Re: Noob in need of advice (Terribly unfit)

5 April 2016 - 7:05pm
Glad you had such a good start!

I also agree that comfy shorts are #1 on any list.............

If you are thinking of canal routes in general, they can be a bit rough up here in Staffs if you ever come up here. I've nearly ended up in the drink once when the muddy grass towpath began to get narrower and narrower because the edge was breaking away into the water...also one towpath was so rough my rackpack was bounced off (luckily not into the water). I find it's worth checking out towpaths first by asking local riders.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 7:01pm
Why is it ridiculous to expect people to share NCR 25 and not hog it all?


You win in the obtuse stakes....Who said they hog it ? If they did they might not it if people invested in that little ringy thing that goes on the handlebars which was my original point. Most of these shared facilities were footpaths before they ever had a few NCN stickers plastered all over them.

Why do you expect people to part like the Red sea when a cyclist hurtles down a path without the decency to warn people they are coming..its a two way thing.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 6:05pm
mjr wrote:
Why is it ridiculous to expect people to share NCR 25 and not hog it all?

Just like a cyclist riding in primary position???
The problem is sharing means different things to different users.

Yes, British cyclists are just too dashed polite and it's a very rare one who will even shout at a track-hogging walker, let alone hit them. While walking in Italy a couple of years ago, I noticed cyclists crash into people and things left in their way much more often.

It seems some car drivers also like to do that.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 5:55pm
661-Pete wrote:Has anyone actually had any experience of the Dog Dazer? I've read some reports that say they're ineffectual and a waste of money, but others may take a different view.Yes. We were issued with them at work. They emit a sound at about 22KHz which most humans can't hear. However when I was changing the battery one day one of our daughters who was sitting in the chair reading suddenly said "Ooh. What are you doing?" so she could clearly hear it. They are intended to be used against aggressive dogs, and fortunately I never had to use it in this situation, but a colleague of mine did, and said it kept the dog a short distance away, but still close for comfort. I don't know what the reports found, but almost all dogs encountered on a bike are not aggressive towards the cyclist/bike.

I've never used it whilst riding a bike, as I've never had any major problem with coping with dogs whilst cycling on shared paths; it would be very difficult to use anyway.
I think the problem is attitude of cyclists. Shared paths are not exclusive cycle paths.

Re: Glazebrook Trail

5 April 2016 - 5:52pm
Yep. It's a footpath. Doh! Just printed a sheet full of OS marking so I don't mess up again.
Thanks John, I'll be trying that route soon

Re: Cycling in groups

5 April 2016 - 5:38pm
arnsider wrote:It strikes me that unless the group is well matched in terms of fitness, trying to stay in a group will be impossible.
CTC and other groups on the road are regulars in group discipline.
I doubt if that is your case.
People unused to long distances and sustained effort will split up and the stragglers will loose heart.
Try holding back the fitter ones and it will lead to impatience and frustration.
Best of luck with that!

Agree with that. Even when average speeds and group etiquette are set out in advance; trying to keep the group ethos alive and well on some rides is akin to herding cats through Battersea dogs home!

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 5:17pm
ossie wrote:mjr wrote:ossie wrote:Im afraid we (well some) are still our own worst enemy. I live on NCN25 which (much to the consternation of some cyclists) is actually a shared facility in many places. That means people can walk dogs and kids.
The A30 is also shared, yet people don't let dogs and kids run amok on it as much.

You have a sense of the ridiculous

Why is it ridiculous to expect people to share NCR 25 and not hog it all?

Good point and Its probably why it works..pedestrians are far more aware, I guess they have to be as getting run down by a peloton of electric bikes on a sunday morning would ruin the day.
Yes, British cyclists are just too dashed polite and it's a very rare one who will even shout at a track-hogging walker, let alone hit them. While walking in Italy a couple of years ago, I noticed cyclists crash into people and things left in their way much more often.

Re: and you thought you had a heavy load?

5 April 2016 - 4:47pm
I saw an interesting programme on TV and it said that owning a bike in parts of the third world can be enough to lift people out of poverty. As it gives them freedom to travel, trade goods etc.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 4:37pm
mjr wrote:ossie wrote:Im afraid we (well some) are still our own worst enemy. I live on NCN25 which (much to the consternation of some cyclists) is actually a shared facility in many places. That means people can walk dogs and kids.
The A30 is also shared, yet people don't let dogs and kids run amok on it as much.

You have a sense of the ridiculous

Even a dog on a lead is unpredictable (as is a young child) so why is it vast numbers of cyclists refuse to have a bell on their bike and insist on approaching pedestrians and dog walkers (who arent blessed with eyes in the back of their head) at speed without warning.
I can't explain the reluctance to have bells. I have one and use it.

Many dont - hence my point

This often leads to confrontation -As a dog walker a friendly ' its worth fitting a bell' usually results in complete silence or an aggressive response.
Well, "it's worth fitting a bell" sounds like sarcasm to me and would get an odd response. I prefer to shout a more straightforward "use your bell!" at offenders.

Anything with drop bars wont have a bell - its not in "the rules"

That aside its far worse in France and Germany where many cyclists on these shared facilities will often barge their way through without slowing,warning and without thanking anyone- they think they own these paths ...
No, it's far better in Germany, where pedestrians are expected to share and not act as if they're taking part in some new lunatic walking supremacist movement! And I write that as someone who was harshly-but-correctly shouted at for failing to share while walking on a German cycle track well before I cycled there

Good point and Its probably why it works..pedestrians are far more aware, I guess they have to be as getting run down by a peloton of electric bikes on a sunday morning would ruin the day.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 4:36pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:Then there are people who react aggressively to those who *have* bells.
Frankly I already have an audible warning system - it's called my voice.
My voice doesn't work well and definitely can't be heard over motorists roaring along a nearby A road, so I use my bells. Most have a musical quality and I get thanked far more than I get aggressive reactions. The aggressive reactions have dwindled to almost nothing over the last few years.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 4:34pm
Then there are people who react aggressively to those who *have* bells.
Frankly I already have an audible warning system - it's called my voice.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 4:15pm
ossie wrote:Im afraid we (well some) are still our own worst enemy. I live on NCN25 which (much to the consternation of some cyclists) is actually a shared facility in many places. That means people can walk dogs and kids.
The A30 is also shared, yet people don't let dogs and kids run amok on it as much.

Even a dog on a lead is unpredictable (as is a young child) so why is it vast numbers of cyclists refuse to have a bell on their bike and insist on approaching pedestrians and dog walkers (who arent blessed with eyes in the back of their head) at speed without warning.
I can't explain the reluctance to have bells. I have one and use it.

This often leads to confrontation -As a dog walker a friendly ' its worth fitting a bell' usually results in complete silence or an aggressive response.
Well, "it's worth fitting a bell" sounds like sarcasm to me and would get an odd response. I prefer to shout a more straightforward "use your bell!" at offenders.

That aside its far worse in France and Germany where many cyclists on these shared facilities will often barge their way through without slowing,warning and without thanking anyone- they think they own these paths ...
No, it's far better in Germany, where pedestrians are expected to share and not act as if they're taking part in some new lunatic walking supremacist movement! And I write that as someone who was harshly-but-correctly shouted at for failing to share while walking on a German cycle track well before I cycled there

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 3:53pm
Has anyone actually had any experience of the Dog Dazer? I've read some reports that say they're ineffectual and a waste of money, but others may take a different view.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 3:32pm
The vast majority of our road network is shared but that doesn't translate to people and dogs meandering around without regard to vehicular traffic. A driver might expect to have to slow to pass pedestrians only on very minor routes and pedestrianised areas. Elsewhere routes are generally adequately wide and there is an expectation that people will be aware of their surroundings. Driving to work or the supermarket on a main road we wouldn't generally expect to be delayed whilst we alert others to our presence or whilst dogs are called to heel.

An extreme comparison perhaps, but if our main cycle routes are to play a role in making cycling as a convenient everyday form of transport then they need to be convenient and quick, like the car trip. I fully agree with those who call for us to take care when near those more vulnerable than ourselves - that is our duty - but I think a promoted cycle route should be designed to cater to the needs of cyclists, their speed and convenience. Just like the narrow country lane or bumpy access track for drivers, narrow shared use should only be considered adequate where used by low volumes of cyclists or pedestrians for leisure, not the main (cycle) route into town.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 3:23pm
Bells? Bloody useless. I've yet to meet the dog walker who is apparently able to hear one.

Re: Dogs on cycle paths - how many where you live?

5 April 2016 - 3:09pm
Heltor Chasca wrote:Go into Bristol and all the peds are walking in the cycle lanes rather than on the pavement. AND tutting at the cyclists weaving around them.

Definitely - especially that new one on Baldwin Street. You know, the one separated from the road by a kerb. The one with cycle logos and a centre line. The one with a completely different surface to the footpath and which separated from the footpath by a line of kerbstones too. And yet pedestrians apparently can't tell the difference: it's not got motor vehicles on it, so it must be a footpath.

Re: My best route so far

5 April 2016 - 3:01pm
Have you checked out Stevenage and North Herts CTC rides?

Some of the best riding around that part of the world is between Baldock and Buntingford via villages like Ugley and Nasty (I kid you not!)
 
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