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Updated: 29 weeks 3 hours ago

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 8:58am
horizon wrote:My guess is that we will not know - we will be back to conjecture.

Understood.

horizon wrote:My own view is that the crash was severe enough to make a helmet useless

Buh? *rubs eyes*

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 8:55am
climo wrote:I'm not trying to preach or even trying to restart that intractable debate.

Understood.

climo wrote:I had a horrendous head injury (not cycling) which would certainly have been mitigated or even eliminated had I been wearing a helmet. Having seen what happened to me (paralysed, 2.5 years in rehab, blah, blah) all my friends wear helmets. Your choice of course but…

Buh? *rubs eyes*

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 8:51am
climo wrote:Hate to ask this but was he wearing a helmet? If not and being a head injury would one have helped him?

I think it's a good question and ideally this thread should be moved to the Helmets section where it can be discussed fully.

It was certainly on my mind. Here we have a tragic accident but one that was witnessed, could be carefully calibrated and didn't involve a vehicle. Had this been an air or train crash it would be thoroughly investigated. If it won't be or cannot be then we are none the wiser.

My guess climo is that we will not know - we will be back to conjecture. It is a shame that all the tools of forensic science cannot get us any further forward. My own view is that the crash was severe enough to make a helmet useless but that is only opinion.

My biggest fear is that a coroner will suggest that had he been wearing a helmet he would have survived (based on nothing more than personal speculation).

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 8:42am
climo wrote:Hate to ask this but was he wearing a helmet? If not and being a head injury would one have helped him?

1. Reports are not definitive but at least one suggests not (references here).
2. Maybe, maybe not.

Can we start asking the same question of people who die of (or otherwise suffer) head injuries in cars and on foot, please?

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 8:08am
That's daft. I think it's a fair question and no doubt will occur to others. I'm not trying to preach or even trying to restart that intractable debate.

I had a horrendous head injury (not cycling) which would certainly have been mitigated or even eliminated had I been wearing a helmet. It has totally changed my life. Having seen what happened to me (paralysed, 2.5 years in rehab, blah, blah) all my friends wear helmets. Your choice of course but please don't try to belittle other peoples questions and viewpoints.

Re: Commute to train then walk other end:rucksack/panniers-

18 May 2016 - 7:53am
Ortleib do a rucksac convertor for their regular panniers. Rolls up when not in use.

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 7:51am
Would it have helped the woman who bruised her leg if she had been wearing motorcycling leathers? Would it have helped if they had all been on recumbents and falling off feet first? Would it have been better if they had all stayed at home?

There are many questions we could ask, and they all reveal a theory or two, and in some cases an axe to grind.

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

18 May 2016 - 7:39am
Hate to ask this but was he wearing a helmet? If not and being a head injury would one have helped him?

Re: Tram lines...

17 May 2016 - 9:40pm
irc wrote:What can trams do that buses can't do? The zero emissions (at point of use) plus is negated when they are sharing the streets with other traffic, especially buses. Otherwise buses built to offer the same seating space as trams would have the advantages of being able to operate both on exclusive routes where appropriate and shared streets where appropriate. They wouldn't have needed the 3/4 of a £ billion spent on the Edinburgh system much of which was for digging up ancient streets to move utilities - not needed for bus systems.

Any minimal speed advantages for trams are due to dedicated routes. You don't need a bus running on rails to have separate routes when appropriate. Another tram speed advantage is the limited stops. Conventional city buses make the mistake of having stops so close together the bus can be stopping every couple of hundred yards. That is easily changed.

And buses don't need tramlines to cause cyclist injuries and deaths.

http://www.croydonadvertiser.co.uk/Coro ... story.html

I would hazard a guess that a tram is much lower rolling resistance than a bus...

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

17 May 2016 - 9:01pm
Postboxer wrote:I'm talking about people stepping out so the driverless car does an emergency stop, the occupants might spill their cornflakes, or hot drinks,

Well I suppose it comes down to whether you consider spilt cornflakes to be more important than a childs life.

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

17 May 2016 - 3:50pm
iviehoff wrote:Curiously, on Friday someone said to me "how long until a cyclist on cyclist collison causes a death". He was thinking of the situation in London, with the rapid growth in cycling and increasingly dense corralling them into superhighways and other routes. Clearly this incident is a random incident that could have happened any time.

There were three fatal cyclist-on-cyclist collisions last year (although one was during a race). ISTR one of this year's earlier fatalities was also reported as being possibly due to contact between two riders.

Re: Cyclist killed in three-rider collision in Lancashire

17 May 2016 - 2:45pm
Curiously, on Friday someone said to me "how long until a cyclist on cyclist collison causes a death". He was thinking of the situation in London, with the rapid growth in cycling and increasingly dense corralling them into superhighways and other routes. Clearly this incident is a random incident that could have happened any time.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

17 May 2016 - 9:39am
Computer-driven cars will not (do not! cannot!) defy the laws of physics. They still need time to come to a stop. What they will usually be able to do is detect the presence and movement of people, animals and objects even when they are not visible (because they will use multiple senses -- not just vision) and predict and prepare for their actions. So playing chicken won't be such fun because actually the robocar will be altering its course and speed before you step out.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

17 May 2016 - 9:25am
Postboxer wrote:I'm talking about people stepping out so the driverless car does an emergency stop, the occupants might spill their cornflakes, or hot drinks, then be rear ended by the driver behind. Kids might play chicken more. A google car got confused by a cyclist doing a trackstand and wouldn't move.
Excellent: The google car did exactly what I do if a cyclist to does a trackstand in front of me: I have no idea if (s)he is going to fall over or accelerate in an unpredictable direction and will wait whilst (s)he sorts himself out. I have also been known to do an emergency stop when kids decided to jump out in front of me. So a google car does the same = good news, better than the 'cars rule the road' attitude of many human drivers.

Re: Downslink works: Bramber to Shoreham-by-Sea

17 May 2016 - 7:34am
squeaker wrote:Despite what it says on the engineering drawings, limestone 'dust' has been used as the top surface, so much like the recent Downslink alternative route under the A283 by the river. For drainage, the designer seems to be relying on camber plus permeability of the sub base. Having ridden it yesterday, my main concern is the edges in some parts, which are not to spec. and are going to crumble quickly, as well as presenting a bit of a hazard.
30cmEdgeDrop.jpg
Yes I see what you mean. I've ridden this route a few times since it reopened and hadn't noticed the raised edge.
It will be interesting to see ( or not ), if over time that edge starts to crumble away.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

17 May 2016 - 7:04am
I'm talking about people stepping out so the driverless car does an emergency stop, the occupants might spill their cornflakes, or hot drinks, then be rear ended by the driver behind. Kids might play chicken more. A google car got confused by a cyclist doing a trackstand and wouldn't move.

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

16 May 2016 - 11:40pm
Why on earth would you consider it to be a problem that pedestrians could cross the road without fearing being mown down?

Re: Tram lines...

16 May 2016 - 9:40pm
http://www.croydonadvertiser.co.uk/Coro ... story.html

What are the chances of Croydon Corporation following the coroners recommendation - one in how many thousand ?

Re: Tram lines...

16 May 2016 - 9:16pm
What can trams do that buses can't do? The zero emissions (at point of use) plus is negated when they are sharing the streets with other traffic, especially buses. Otherwise buses built to offer the same seating space as trams would have the advantages of being able to operate both on exclusive routes where appropriate and shared streets where appropriate. They wouldn't have needed the 3/4 of a £ billion spent on the Edinburgh system much of which was for digging up ancient streets to move utilities - not needed for bus systems.

Any minimal speed advantages for trams are due to dedicated routes. You don't need a bus running on rails to have separate routes when appropriate. Another tram speed advantage is the limited stops. Conventional city buses make the mistake of having stops so close together the bus can be stopping every couple of hundred yards. That is easily changed.

And buses don't need tramlines to cause cyclist injuries and deaths.

http://www.croydonadvertiser.co.uk/Coro ... story.html

Re: Driverless cars in UK this year

16 May 2016 - 9:07pm
It would be easy to bully driverless cars though, just step out in front of them to cross the road, safe in the knowledge that they'll stop for you. This may also cause problems when some cars have a computer in control, some have a human, some drivers may take advantage, assuming the driverless cars will be easily identifiable.
 
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