Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 1 year 17 weeks ago

Re: Week-long tour in the W/N-W of Ireland. Top tips please!

29 January 2016 - 7:55pm
I cycled the northwest, (Donegal) and have maps you can download and loads of information about the route and what you might see or do and also places to stay if you're not camping.

I went in April and had good weather. The traffic was light as it was before the tourist season kicked in. Slieve League is worth the visit.By June, you'll have light till 10.30pm.

http://www.farawayvisions.com/bikepacking/bikepacking-ireland-wild-atlantic-way/

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 7:48pm
hamster wrote:It's an American tourer - suited to long dry summers. Most of their roads are graded: I never needed a gear ratio lower than 28/30 in 800 miles of camping touring there. For the UK's short, vicious climbs and wet roads it wouldn't be nearly so much fun.

More info on the style bike shown. Gearing is fine is you ride PBP in under 60 hours.

https://janheine.wordpress.com/2015/04/ ... road-bike/

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 7:42pm
kylecycler wrote:Bicycler wrote:Oh well, you've just confirmed what I've always known; there's something wrong with me!

Each to his own.
Yeah, well, it's a personal thing - I suppose it depends how you define 'right' and 'wrong'! Each to his own, right enough.

Yes, and coloured rimwalls are just so necessary on a touring bike.

Have you taken into account the fact that rimwall fashions may vary in the countries you are pedalling through? Or is this the next big thing - rims connected to the web and satellites and social media so that the tyres/rims/tyre walls can change colour as you progress?

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 7:37pm
Well this story we must be told breton, even if in another thread.

And long or short.

And gotta ask, were any other tastes/flavours involved other than olives and red wine

Please excuse possibly scurrilous post on the grounds that this post comes from a london pub under the influence of a fine wimbledon beer

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 7:26pm
Sweep wrote:bretonbikes wrote:I think it very much depends on personal taste of course, but taste is also something we develop (I didn't use to like olives or red wine;-).

At the risk of you tempting me into an off topic digression breton, i can understand the olive thing (now i love them) but the red wine! Were you some sort of freak/prisoner of french rather than italian wine culture

I was converted to both in one rather crazy evening in Paris, but that's a long story;-)

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 7:24pm
bretonbikes wrote:I think it very much depends on personal taste of course, but taste is also something we develop (I didn't use to like olives or red wine;-).

At the risk of you tempting me into an off topic digression breton, i can understand the olive thing (now i love them) but the red wine! Were you some sort of freak/prisoner of french rather than italian wine culture

Dutch tulip fields

29 January 2016 - 6:35pm
We are planning to visit Holland in April to ride through tulip fields. We prefer quiet areas, attractive towns and do not mind what type of accomodation, nothing too 'touristy'. I have heard for example the Keukenhof gardens are a bit of a Disneyworld for horticulturists and to be avoided.
Has anyone any ideas on a good base for leisurely day rides of 30 to 40 miles?
Many thanks
John Wren

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 6:06pm
It's an American tourer - suited to long dry summers. Most of their roads are graded: I never needed a gear ratio lower than 28/30 in 800 miles of camping touring there. For the UK's short, vicious climbs and wet roads it wouldn't be nearly so much fun.

Rotterdam to Constanța, Romania

29 January 2016 - 5:58pm
Hi I am just thinking of a ride to do this summer and have always fancied going to the Black Sea! I was thinking of approx Holland, Germany, Czech Republic bit of Austria, Hungary and finally Romania (via Transylvania) to Constana then flying home from Bucharest I'd imagine. (I am Chester based and I don't think the are any nearer airports serviced by the North West)

I've rode a far few miles in Germany and Holland but have no experience with Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania.

Has anyone got any advice or possible pointers to web sites to look at? I know the obvious thing is to get on the Danube but I think I'd rather be a bit further off the beaten track so to speak.

Ow also I would be doing it as an Audax rather than as a tourist so not too interested in diversions off route. That is for another time.

Thanking you in advance

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

29 January 2016 - 5:27pm
kylecycler wrote:I'll take back everything I meant about the aesthetics of 26-inch wheels - notwithstanding the practicalities, if someone doesn't like this, visually at least, there's something wrong with them, IMHO - I've never seen a bicycle that looks so 'right'...

ff-496-studio-1_24600611286_o (Large).jpg
http://theradavist.com/2016/01/firefly-for-jan-heine/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/fireflybi ... 3986789435

IMHO,from a practical POV,the rear caliper would be better in the rear triangle,though I suspect it's been fitted where it has due to the short c/stays,which rules out a rear rack,which limits it's carrying capacity,which rules it out as a serious load lugger.
The tyres(2.3inch) are huge and theoretically would cope with some seriously bad roads,but they're uber lightweights,so I ask myself,if I ride some seriously rough tracks on 700x40s(actual 37x37mm)tyres and consider them comfortable,and quick on tarmac.Would I need 2.3inch rubber? .
There is the possibility of fitting 2.1inch knobbles(?) which would handle anything.
The riding position looks a bit extreme to my eye but everyone is different.
That said,I think I'd refer a longer head tube for a more upright position with a longer steerer for some adjustment either way.
I don't like the idea of only having front panniers as it limits luggage capacity and of course offers no option of carrying luggage on the back where I prefer it for (lighter)touring.
As a tourer it's overgeared.
Where's the mudguards(fenders)?


From a purely aesthetic POV,though I like big rubber,there's a limit and I don't like amber/skinwalls,much prefer all black tyres,though don't mind reflective sidewall strips.
I like a more compact frame so would prefer a shorter seatube,steeper angled TT.
I don't like the black forks,or the gold headset,they're just plain wrong aesthetically to my eye.
The chainset hasn't got a lot going for it either.
With the rack off it looks more like a gravel race bike than a tourer and is geared as such too.

My personal 2d's worth YVMV.

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

29 January 2016 - 4:48pm
Sorry, didn't know they were much more expensive in the UK. You can buy them in mainland Europe for €599... which is £455. That is very similar in price or even cheaper than the Surly Disc Trucker.
Disc Trucker's RRP is £399
Currently £320 from Triton Cycles: http://www.tritoncycles.co.uk/frames-fo ... wgodVI8GTA

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

29 January 2016 - 4:06pm
irc wrote:JaccoW wrote:How about a Specialized Awol expert frame?

Have you priced them? £700!!! Getting into custom build territory.

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... t-ec128708

Another vote for the Disc Trucker here. Cheap for a frameset. And the Truckers are great do it all bikes.
Sorry, didn't know they were much more expensive in the UK. You can buy them in mainland Europe for €599... which is £455. That is very similar in price or even cheaper than the Surly Disc Trucker.
And you can put pretty much any gearing on it. Derailleur, Rohloff and even belt drive.

Re: Calais

29 January 2016 - 3:17pm
It sounds like Calais isn't too bad then. I guess there's a free campsite nearby

Re: America: the bizarre

29 January 2016 - 12:39pm
Vorpal wrote:This is a whole nother thread, but yes, sign posting in the UK is really poor. And it's not because they get nicked.
I think there are 2 separate issues. One is poor signposting and the other signs (whether poor or otherwise) that are no longer there. Off the top of my head I can think of half a dozen places within 2 or 3 miles of home at significant junctions where there are now empty poles where there used to be signs.

I don't know if they were stolen in this instance but I can't think of any other reason why they would simply be removed and not replaced. A search on the BBC news website for "stolen road signs" throws up a number of reported instances in different parts of the country over recent years, involving thousands of pounds worth of signs in each instance. Along with theft electricity, railway signalling & telecommunication cables it seems to be an ongoing problem, even if it has been reduced somewhat in the last year by more strict regulation of scrap metal dealers.

Rick.
 
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