Cycling UK Forum - Touring & Expedition

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Updated: 29 weeks 1 day ago

Re: Wheel recommendations for credit card touring

8 February 2016 - 8:48pm
The best book about bicycle wheels was written by Brandt, and first published in 1981, long before to-day's deep section rims.
Brandt calculated that a radial load of 50Kg at the axle of a 36 spoke wheel would produce a maximum radial deflection of the rim of 0.15mm......you won't detect that by riding a bicycle fitted with pneumatic tyres.
When you put a steel wire under tension the wire stretches. Unless the load on the wire is approaching a load which will cause the wire to break by plastic deformation, adding (say) 1Kg to the load on the wire will produce the same amount of stretch regardless of the starting tension. In other words the relationship between load and stretch (Young's modulus)is linear, and unless spokes are under no tension at all or are failing plastically, a "slack" wheel will respond in exactly the same way to a load as a similar "tight" wheel. Properly tensioned conventional wheels have an average spoke tension in the region of 100Kg per spoke. With a 32 spoke wheel, pedaling torque increases the tension on 16 spokes, you won't be able to feel the spokes stretch as a result of the torque you apply by pedaling. The additional pedaling load is small compared with the total static tension of approximately 1600Kg on 16 spokes.
Spokes fail at the elbow by fatigue caused by the cyclical un-loading of spokes at the bottom of the wheel. When one spoke fails in a wheel, other spokes are likely to be going the same way......how soon they fail is determined by their fatigue status, not by replacing a failed spoke, unless you also stress-relieve all the spokes when you replace a broken spoke, when you may extend the life of the other spokes.
If you speak to somebody who builds a reasonable range and number of wheels, they can tell you some things about wheels.
1) a dished rear wheel is much less stiff laterally in one direction than it is in the other direction, due to the bracing angle of the spokes.
2) a wheel with a big, stiff rim is much stiffer laterally than a similar wheel with a narrow, shallow rim
3) wheels with reduced spoke count work by having a big stiff rim (which is either heavy or thin walled) and high individual spoke tension
When you push the pedal down, you want to drive the bike forwards, but there is always a tendency for the bottom bracket to flex sideways, which is resisted by the lateral stiffness of the frame and wheel. A stiff bike accelerates immediately you push the pedal.

Re: Trains in Ireland

8 February 2016 - 8:38pm
Has anyone used the bus service? It looks good value. How are they with bikes?

Re: Touring in Rutland/Leicestershire

8 February 2016 - 7:57pm
Cyclists cafe Cafe Ventoux tucked away in Tugby in Leicestershire's alps is a delight and has a warm welcome any cyclists, not just the seriously hip
There's also some lovely gated roads not on Streetview, around Skeffington

Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 7:53pm
mnichols wrote:anyone found a way of keeping the pump protected on the bike? Cling Film maybe?

[emoji23] Or similarly shaped, stretchable, item? Can't think what [emoji535]

Re: Trains in Ireland

8 February 2016 - 7:52pm
Train not Upham!!!!

Re: Trains in Ireland

8 February 2016 - 7:52pm
Thanks. I think the Upham to Cork sounds like a good plan. We'll be travelling on Saturdays so should be none push hour also!

Re: Wheel recommendations for credit card touring

8 February 2016 - 7:27pm
mnichols wrote:http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/fiber-fix-em ... 9a49a10ebc

Has anyone used one on the road side? Do they work? would they work on all wheels? Ambrosia, Ultegra, Mavic?
They were reviewed in Cycle some time ago, by CJ I think, the conclusion was that you couldn't get enough tension to be worthwhile.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 7:24pm
anyone found a way of keeping the pump protected on the bike? Cling Film maybe?

Re: Wheel recommendations for credit card touring

8 February 2016 - 7:21pm
I've order the Ultegra 6800 wheels - managed to get them for under £200 with free delivery and free returns

and the Grand Prix 4 seasons at £27

ordered three spare spokes, although I'm intrigued by the emergency spoke replacement - seems like a good idea if a spoke goes on the rear cassette side and you haven' got the tools - also only need to carry one per group of people, not three spokes each, and I don't have to remember tp carry the right the spoke for the wheel

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/fiber-fix-em ... 9a49a10ebc

Has anyone used one on the road side? Do they work? would they work on all wheels? Ambrosia, Ultegra, Mavic?

Re: Aeropress Coffee Maker

8 February 2016 - 6:35pm
A friend of mine runs a rescue-home for unwanted Aero-presses, in Easton, Bristol. I'm sending it off to him for re-hab. I'm keeping my Bialetti...b

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 6:00pm
axel_knutt wrote:Pete Jack wrote:And it doesn't come with a bracket that fits under a bottle cage so you lose a cage
I've made a bracket to put the bottle and the pump on the same pair of braze-ons.It would be nice if they offered at least an optional bracket that fits under a cage, I found one in a used bike place.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 5:58pm
Pete Jack wrote:And it doesn't come with a bracket that fits under a bottle cage so you lose a cage
I've made a bracket to put the bottle and the pump on the same pair of braze-ons.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 5:56pm
Pete Jack wrote:Looks like the Lezyne wins. I've seen complaints that the Topeak foot bracket is flimsy, it's not actually but I have had the bolt that holds it on fall out and the bracket detach. I ended up putting Locktite Red on it and it hasn't come loose since. I've also had the Topeak quit pumping altogether; the piston ring came adrift - easy to fix but it shouldn't happen. And it doesn't come with a bracket that fits under a bottle cage so you lose a cage (I believe the Lezyne has that issue)

Fine in good weather, but keep your expensive kit in your panniers. The weather is a killer of seals etc. It's so small it goes in my tool bag. I'm not a fan of clutter. That's what my beard is for...b

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 5:54pm
Looks like the Lezyne wins. I've seen complaints that the Topeak foot bracket is flimsy, it's not actually but I have had the bolt that holds it on fall out and the bracket detach. I ended up putting Locktite Red on it and it hasn't come loose since. I've also had the Topeak quit pumping altogether; the piston ring came adrift - easy to fix but it shouldn't happen. And it doesn't come with a bracket that fits under a bottle cage so you lose a cage (I believe the Lezyne has that issue)

Re: Aeropress Coffee Maker

8 February 2016 - 5:09pm
Mine's genuine, years old and still works AFAIK, but the plastic has crazed. It's OK but I'm not sure it was worth the price. Anything's better than bad coffee, but I think the old filter cones are good enough for me!

Re: Trains in Ireland

8 February 2016 - 5:01pm
Information available here.

It seems that there are rush hour restrictions for services out of Dublin Heuston. Outside of these times there appears to be some typically Irish wiggle room:-

“These routes are restricted to two bicycles per service”

“Iarnród Éireann Irish Rail reserve the right to refuse to carry more than two bicycles if there are only two bike spaces available on a service “

It might be worth a phone call or two before booking but you definitely need to book in advance and on line.

An alternative would be to look at buses. Most will carry bicycles in the luggage compartment subject to space being available and at the discretion of the driver. Boarding the bus at the terminus and travelling at off peak times is the best strategy.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 4:36pm
+1 for being in the Lezyne club. My gauge malfunctioned and I was sent a no quibble replacement. No probs since...b

Re: Trains in Ireland

8 February 2016 - 4:34pm
I think each train actually can take three bikes and you can book on the irish rail website. Make sure to book your train in advance as it is much cheaper.

You would be getting the train to Killarney. From there it's a lovely cycle to kenmare, with a decent climb up molls gap.

Most of the trains going to kilarney change in mallow or cork and the Dublin -Cork train has a mail carriage that can take lots of bikes.

My advice would be to book on as many bikes as you can, travel off peak and you will find a way to get the extra bikes on. They are usually not strict.

Enjoy, it's great cycling down there.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 3:46pm
Lezyne for me as well, much better than the Topeak one. Get can really good pressures.

Re: Pump Recommendations

8 February 2016 - 3:41pm
I have the Lezyne one too, the HP version. It does an excellent job. Easy peasy to get to 100 psi on my 28c tyres. My main grumps with it are that its a tad too long to fit easily into my Carradice Racktop bag, and the hose can easily unscrew removable valves if you haven't ensured that the valve is tightened up first.
 
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