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Updated: 14 weeks 2 days ago

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 5:23pm
psmiffy wrote:I always smile when I see a thread of this nature – and then move on to the next thread – pretty much the same old epitaphs – “I only use two panniers” – it is like people have had their manhood/womenhood questioned followed by a slap across the face with a wet fish.

Anyway I digress - The OP has recognized that he is doomed to use two panniers but is still hankering after a bit of extra space to carry some stuff and is asking whether one of these new? fangled frame bags would do the trick – having resisted the temptation to move on I can say I really have no idea – but having clicked the odd thread on here when they have been mooted for off road touring I would suggest that they they offer no more literage than a smallish dry bag (at a far greater £/l) bungeed onto the rear rack alongside the tent – added in the inconvenience of having to mess with a loada Velcro straps when putting on/taking off I cannot see that they offer any great advantage to the common or garden road touring cyclist – in support of this anecdotally (cannot find a reference or learned paper to support my position) I have never seen a road touring cyclist sporting such an abomination.

Got to agree with you smiffy. Fashion i reckon. They will be going cheap on ebay/in classifieds here in a few years. Must get round to posting on the madness I saw in Pearsons the other day.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 2:48pm
Of course, every time we see one of these old chestnuts we could ignore it or just tell the poster to do a search.

Nonetheless, I agree about those framebags. A recent article on what is now called bikepacking showed a bewildering arrangement of very small bags strapped to every spare bit of tubing. Total baggage amount equalled about one easy to carry (rear) pannier. I fail to see the advantage of carrying all your stuff in lots of small bags instead of one or two larger ones.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 2:14pm
I always smile when I see a thread of this nature – and then move on to the next thread – pretty much the same old epitaphs – “I only use two panniers” – it is like people have had their manhood/womenhood questioned followed by a slap across the face with a wet fish.

Anyway I digress - The OP has recognized that he is doomed to use two panniers but is still hankering after a bit of extra space to carry some stuff and is asking whether one of these new? fangled frame bags would do the trick – having resisted the temptation to move on I can say I really have no idea – but having clicked the odd thread on here when they have been mooted for off road touring I would suggest that they they offer no more literage than a smallish dry bag (at a far greater £/l) bungeed onto the rear rack alongside the tent – added in the inconvenience of having to mess with a loada Velcro straps when putting on/taking off I cannot see that they offer any great advantage to the common or garden road touring cyclist – in support of this anecdotally (cannot find a reference or learned paper to support my position) I have never seen a road touring cyclist sporting such an abomination.

Folding bike tips

9 May 2016 - 1:55pm
Hi, love this forum, I'm new here and looking for opinion and tips on buying my first folding bike, purpose of buying is as second bike, casual ride, any knowledge sharing are much appreciate.

Sent from my X9006 using Tapatalk

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 1:24pm
If you find that you aren't happy with rear panniers only, maybe you can find another solution?

Tubus do a clamp-on thing for the front. Also, there are some front racks (maybe Old Man Mountain?) that are axle mounted.

If it's because the forks don't have mounting, they can potentially be replaced with touring forks.

Re: Northern England Road Cycling Tour - any help appreciate

9 May 2016 - 1:11pm
Good suggestion above. Also look at Lancashire cycle route http://www.visitlancashire.com/dbimgs/L ... 20Loop.pdf

Loads of choice on the sustrans site map perhaps based from Penrith if you want the north Pennines? http://www.sustrans.org.uk/ncn/map

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 1:03pm
I'm sure you will get lots of different answers. Lot's of folks seem to be saying you will be fine, so here is a case for the opposing point of view...

I started off just using rear panniers and bags (plus a bar bag which I still use). But these days when camping I wouldn't want to be without my four pannier setup. I don't carry a "top pack" only things on the top of the rack are the tent poles. My bags are not packed full to bursting point so I can get to things easily. I have room for adding food and water (often needed as I tend to wild camp). My bike feels much better balanced (only have sleeping stuff and clothes in the font bags), I can happily climb out of the saddle if I need to. Going downhill my bike feels rock solid, before with all the weight on the rear I had a couple of very scary moments when I had some pretty big front wheel shimmies going down steep hills, wouldn't want to have that again. Having my gear organized into the four bags makes it easy to setup camp and pack things away. I can easily stop during the day and use my cooking stuff. Things like the wet tent and wet weather gear are all together and no worries about other stuff getting wet from them. I usually tour alone in NW Scotland in the Spring and Autumn, as a result perhaps I tend to carry more clothing than some would for a summer tour (I've had snow one day and blazing sun the next). There are also not so many pubs and places to eat so I tend to cook a fair bit. Your and other folks requirements may be different to mine.

Yes I'm sure I could go back to just rear panniers plus other bags, but I wouldn't want to. Only you can decide if you are happy without the front bags. Perhaps you could try going without them on whatever bike you currently have? As others have said if you can it might be an idea to try the new bike with a load similar to what you are likely to carry. After all if you are going to spend a lot on a bike it would be good to get one that works well for you.

Re: Northern England Road Cycling Tour - any help appreciate

9 May 2016 - 12:36pm
You might want to take a look at the Yorkshire Dales Cyleway:
http://www.cyclethedales.org.uk/cycle-t ... s-cycleway
perhaps not as far each day as you had in mind. But not an easy route by any means and lots of places to stop off at along the way. Not that hard to extend it either if you want longer days.

Northern England Road Cycling Tour - any help appreciated!

9 May 2016 - 10:52am
Hi there,

My first post…. I am looking for some advice on a 4 day tour I have planned in July. A friend and I are looking for a road tour around the Lake District or Pennines (anywhere picturesque and fun to cycle basically). Rather than building the route for ourselves we were wondering if there are websites or anything which have established circular routes which are already set out and all you have to is print and book the accommodation (I know we are lazy..)

We are looking at doing about 75 miles a day and ending up back where we started after the four days. Any advice from you wonderful people is most appreciated! Ive tried googling but couldn’t find much.

Thanks very much for any help

Re: Ridgeway - Avebury to Uffington

9 May 2016 - 10:48am
simonhill wrote:Most was OK, but there were a few short stretches with deep muddy/slime pools. These were usually in places eg small gullies, that you couldn't get round. Some were almost axle deep. Of course just one of these mean you get dirty. I think these were mainly on the first day from the Avebury end.
The Avebury end is mostly pretty good these days. 4x4 access is seasonal, apart from farmers, and it had been restored to almost a reasonable cycle track the last time I used it (from Uffcott/Barbury Castle southwards).

Re: Ridgeway - Avebury to Uffington

9 May 2016 - 10:37am
foxyrider wrote:So Mercalia, small wheels would be better than big? I'm pretty sure big wheels are better on rough surfaces - that's my experience at least.
It's fatter tyres that make rough surfaces easier, mostly. I suspect mercalia is equating 700c with 23 or 25 mm tyres.
Big wheels are better, but small would only start to be difficult when you get down to 20" or so.

Re: Ridgeway - Avebury to Uffington

9 May 2016 - 10:33am
I rode it 25 years ago and I'm sure much has changed, but not the geology or geography. It was June and I don't remember it being a particularly wet year. I expected dry tracks as it was chalk.

Most was OK, but there were a few short stretches with deep muddy/slime pools. These were usually in places eg small gullies, that you couldn't get round. Some were almost axle deep. Of course just one of these mean you get dirty. I think these were mainly on the first day from the Avebury end.

I remember seeing some banker tearing around in an old Land Rover, splashing through these puddles and obviously making them worse. I assumed he was a green off roader, but as I got closer I realised he was a farmer. So much for guardians of the land.

Overall a good multi day ride, I particularly liked Waylan Smithy very spooky.

Re: Ridgeway - Avebury to Uffington

9 May 2016 - 10:28am
I've ridden Wantage to Avebury on a Thorn Audax (28 mm Gatorskins) with no real problems, in dry conditions.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 10:22am
I've never used front panniers or bar bag. Two rear and a very small saddlebag have been enough.

I camped for 2 months in NZ, although there was 2 of us so some gear shared. I've also ridden plenty of short tours in UK and Europe solo with just 2.

If you've only got 2 you trim your stuff accordingly. I rarely camp nowadays, but still fill 2. The law that states gear expands to fill the available space also works in reverse.

Free yourself from the tyranny of 'the front'.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 9:42am
wearwell wrote:Better off without front panniers, if you can get all your kit in. If there's any weight in there you can get a pendulum effect making hill climbing much harder work on the arms.

Yes I've found that particularly on a steep/long climb.
Nonetheless I was quite keen on front panniers for weight distribution -then ( to cut a long story short) I had an off when a front pannier snagged on concrete flower planter.
That turned my wheel and brought me down. Inattentiveness on my part but a rear pannier wouldn't have had the same effect.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 8:04am
I've never used front panniers.

Two rear panniers and a bar bag or other front luggage, have generally been enough. When I was a teenager, I used to strap my tent to my handlebars.

These days, I go with kids, and my trailer isn't big enough

Re: Ridgeway - Avebury to Uffington

9 May 2016 - 8:04am
So Mercalia, small wheels would be better than big? I'm pretty sure big wheels are better on rough surfaces - that's my experience at least.

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 7:54am
I've always just used rear panniers and tent strapped on the top of the rack for the month long summer tour type journey. Wear one and wash one for cycle clothes plus one off bike lightweight outfit and a thin and a thick fleece and cycle longs.

I think you need to work through your kit list and do a test pack before you buy the bike.

Are you intending to take less stuff or just to redistribute it? I find that most of us are fairly fixed in what we like to take and the volume of gear that is acceptable so I'm guessing you may not want to cut down?

Re: Long touring without front panniers

9 May 2016 - 6:47am
Ridgie wrote:I'm currently in a position to buy a fairly light touring bike, (titanium) that will not accommodate front panniers.
Got to ask (or you never learn) - why won't it accommodate front panniers?

Re: Hub Dynamo

9 May 2016 - 12:22am
Sweep wrote:AaronR wrote:- bikes primary use is commuting, but long range touring is on the cards (in about 17.5 years when I retire, by which time bike will be like Trigger's broom)

g
Will watch this thread with interest. And I do like to see someone planning ahead No disrespect - my current favourite bike is a trigger's broom and just a shade over 17.5 years old. Happy hols to you to.


well I bought my Dawes 1-Down new for a bargain price in 1999 ( 25% off) and didnt use it until 2 or so years ago, why I must have the newest looking copy that is still ridden
 
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